Browsing by Subject "F10"

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  • Chowdhury, Abdur R. (2003)
    BOFIT Discussion Papers 3/2003
    Published in Comparative Economic Studies vol. 46 no. 4 (2004), pp. 487-514 as "Private Savings in Transition Economies: Are there Terms of Trade Shocks"
    This paper examines whether terms of trade shocks have an asymmetric effect on private savings in transition economies.A simple three-period framework is developed to show that, in the presence of binding credit constraints in bad states of nature, savings rates can be sensitive to favorable movements in the permanent component of the terms of trade.This result contrasts with the prediction of the conventional consumption-smoothing model.Empirical analysis with a dynamic panel model further confirms that while favorable movements in the permanent component of the terms of trade have an asymmetric effect on private savings, the magnitude of the effect is relatively small.The results are robust for alternative estimators, determinants, and country groupings.JEL classification: F10, E21, P33 Key words: transition, private savings, terms of trade
  • Bussiére, Matthieu; Peltonen, Tuomas (2008)
    BOFIT Discussion Papers 25/2008
    Published with third author Delle Chiaie, S. in IMF Economic Review, Volume 62, Issue 1, April 2014, Pages 146-178
    This paper estimates export and import price equations for 41 countries -including 28 emerging market economies. Further, it relates the estimated elasticities to structural fac-tors and tests for statistical breaks in the relation between trade prices and exchange rates. Results indicate that (i) the elasticity of trade prices in emerging markets is sizeable, but not significantly higher than in advanced economies; (ii) such elasticity is primarily influ-enced by macroeconomic factors such as the exchange rate regime and the inflationary en-vironment, although microeconomic factors such as product differentiation also play a role; (iii) export and import price elasticities tend to be strongly correlated across countries; (iv) pass-through to import prices has declined in some advanced economies, noticeably the United States; this is consistent with a rise in pricing-to-market in several EMEs and espe-cially with a change in the geographical composition of U.S. imports. Keywords: emerging market economies, exchange rate pass-through, pricing-to-market, local and producer currency pricing, exchange rate regime. JEL classification: F10, F30, F41.
  • Dean, Judith; Fung, K.C.; Wang, Zhi (2008)
    BOFIT Discussion Papers 31/2008
    Book Chapter published in: Vertical Specialization and Value-Added Trade, Nova Science Publishers, Inc. 2011, Pages 21-38
    Two recent phenomena have transformed the nature of world trade: the explosive growth of Chinese trade, and the growth of vertically specialized trade due to international production fragmentation. While vertical specialization may explain much of the growth and unique features of Chinese trade, few papers have quantitatively assessed these two phenomena together. In part, this is because it is difficult to measure just how vertically specialized Chinese trade is. The unique features of China's extensive processing trade cause both the identification of imported intermediate goods, and their allocation across sectors, to depend upon the Chinese trade regime. In this paper, we estimate the vertical specialization of Chinese exports, addressing these two challenges. Using two Chinese benchmark input-output tables, and a detailed Chinese trade dataset which distinguishes processing trade from other forms of trade, we develop a new method of identifying intermediate goods imported into China. Vertical specialization is then estimated using two methods. The first method uses the Hummels, Ishii and Yi (2001) measure, the official benchmark IO tables, and incorporates our identification correction. The second method follows the first, but also incorporates the Koopman, Wang and Wei (2008) method of splitting the benchmark IO tables into separate tables for processing and normal exports, in order to address the allocation problem. Results show strong evidence of an Asian network of intermediate suppliers to China, and the two methods provide a range of estimates for the foreign content of Chinese exports. In 2002 aggregate exports ranges between 25% and 46%, with some individual sectors are as high as 52! %-95%. Across destinations, under both methods, the vertical specialization of Chinese exports declines with the level of development of the trading partner. JEL Codes: F10, F14 Keywords: China, fragmentation, vertical specialization, trade growth
  • Simola, Heli (2021)
    BOFIT Discussion Papers 12/2021
    We examine the role of demand composition in explaining the trade collapse and recovery during the ongoing covid-19 crisis. We apply an import-intensity-adjusted measure of demand to examineimport trends in 40 advanced and emerging economies over the period 1Q95 to 4Q20. We focus on the crisis periods related to covid-19 and the global financial crisis in 2008–2009. As during the global financial crisis, we find that import-intensity-adjusted demand is a key factor contributing to trade developments during the covid-19 crisis. The analysis also reveals substantial differences between the current crisis and the global financial crisis. Trade decline during the global financial crisis was heavily investment-led. In the current crisis, consumption and import demand from the service sector have had much larger roles. The recovery of trade has been notably faster during the covid-19 crisis and led by exports as opposed to the much more important role played by domestic demand during the global financial crisis.