Browsing by Subject "H11"

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  • Kudrin, Alexey; Gurvich, Evsey (2015)
    BOFIT Policy Brief 1/2015
    This article first appeared in Russian in the journal Voprosy Ekonomiki No. 12, 2014.
    ​The slowdown of the Russian economy is due to chronic factors and cannot be cured by simple fixes such as relaxing monetary or fiscal policy. The biggest impediment to growth in Russia’s case is the weak market environment, evidenced foremost by the dominance of state-owned enterprises and quasi-government companies. Strong incentives for business and public administration to enhance efficiency are required. The key policy objectives necessary to move Russia away from its current model based on imported growth to a new growth model are laid out in this analysis.
  • Goel, Rajeev K.; Korhonen, Iikka (2009)
    BOFIT Discussion Papers 5/2009
    Published in Economic Systems 35 (2011) 109-124 as "Exports and Cross-National Corruption: A Disaggregated Examination"
    This research examines the connection between a country's export structure and corruption, incorporating disaggregated data on exports for a recent time period over a large set of nations. We ask whether various types of exports (e.g. agricultural, mineral, manufacturing and fuel) exert similar influences on corruption across nations. Our results suggest that corruption decreases as nations attain prosperity, as economic and political freedoms increase, and with a larger government size. Ceteris paribus, transition countries are also found to be more corrupt. Ethnic and linguistic fractionalizations exert opposite influences on corruption, while religious fractionalization does not seem to matter. Although the effects of ore and manufacturing exports are statistically insignificant, agricultural and fuel exports affect corruption significantly. Our findings for fuel exports support previous research, as well as uniquely demonstrate that the impact of fuel exports is sensitive to the prevailing corruption level. We conclude with a discussion of policy implications. Keywords: corruption, exports, resource curse, government JEL codes: H11, K42, O13
  • Staehr, Karsten (2003)
    BOFIT Discussion Papers 1/2003
    Published in The European Journal of Comparative Economics, Vol. 2, n. 2 (2005), pp. 177-202
    Growth regressions have provided important insights into the impact of economic reforms on growth in transition economies.Using principal components to decompose reform variables and construct reform clusters, we address unsettled issues such as the importance of sequencing and reform speed.The results indicate a broad-based reform policy is good for growth, but so is a policy of liberalisation and small-scale privatisation without structural reforms.Conversely, large-scale privatisation without adjoining reforms, market opening without supporting reforms and bank liberalisation without enterprise restructuring affect growth negatively.Swift reform policies allow transition countries to benefit from higher growth for a longer period of time.The speed of reforms otherwise appears to have only limited effects on short-term and medium-term growth. Keywords: Economic reforms, growth, principal components, gradualism versus big-bang JEL classification: P21, P30, C33, H11
  • Fungáčová, Zuzana; Määttä, Ilari; Weill, Laurent (2016)
    BOFIT Discussion Papers 18/2016
    Published online in Comparative Economic Studies as "Corruption in China: What Shapes Social Attitudes Toward It?"
    ​This research investigates the determinants of corruption in China using micro-level data. We use survey data on 6,000 households from 28 provinces to estimate logit models that show how corruption perceptions and attitudes to corruption are shaped by individual and provincial determinants. Respondents who see themselves as lower class, as well as members of the Communist Party of China, are more likely to perceive and reject corruption than other respondents. People in rural areas perceive less corruption, but do not differ in their attitudes toward corruption.