Browsing by Subject "J44"

Sort by: Order: Results:

Now showing items 1-4 of 4
  • Pekkala Kerr, Sari; Kerr, William; Özden, Çağlar; Parsons, Christopher (2017)
    Bank of Finland Research Discussion Papers 2/2017
    Forthcoming in Journal of Economic Perspectives
    The global distribution of talent is highly skewed and the resources available to countries to develop and utilize their best and brightest vary substantially. The migration of skilled workers across countries tilts the deck even further. Using newly available data, we first review the landscape of global talent mobility, which is both asymmetric and rising in importance. We next consider the determinants of global talent flows at the individual and firm levels and sketch some important implications. Third, we review the national gatekeepers for skilled migration and broad differences in approaches used to select migrants for admission. Looking forward, the capacity of people, firms, and countries to successfully navigate this tangled web of global talent will be critical to their success.
  • Pekkala Kerr, Sari; Kerr, William; Özden, Çağlar; Parsons, Christopher (2017)
    Bank of Finland Research Discussion Papers 7/2017
    This paper reviews recent research regarding high-skilled migration. We adopt a data-driven perspective, bringing together and describing several ongoing research streams that range from the construction of global migration databases, to the legal codification of national policies regarding high-skilled migration, to the analysis of patent data regarding cross-border inventor movements. A common theme throughout this research is the importance of agglomeration economies for explaining high-skilled migration. We highlight some key recent findings and outline major gaps that we hope will be tackled in the near future.
  • Pekkala Kerr, Sari; Kerr, William R. (2016)
    Bank of Finland Research Discussion Papers 33/2016
    We examine immigrant entrepreneurship and the survival and growth of immigrant-founded businesses over time relative to native-founded companies. Our work quantities immigrant contributions to new firm creation in a wide variety of fields and using multiple definitions. While significant research effort has gone into understanding the economic impact of immigration into the United States, comprehensive data for quantifying immigrant entrepreneurship are difficult to assemble. We combine several restricted-access U.S. Census Bureau data sets to create a unique longitudinal data platform that covers 1992-2008 and many states. We describe differences in the types of businesses initially formed by immigrants and their medium-term growth patterns. We also consider the relationship of these outcomes to the immigrants’ age at arrival to the United States.
  • Pekkala Kerr, Sari; Kerr, William (2020)
    Research Policy 3 ; April
    We study immigrant entrepreneurship in 2007 and 2012 using the Survey of Business Owners. First-generation immigrants create about 25% of new firms in America, but this share exceeds 40% in some states. Conditional on basic regression controls, immigrant-owned firms tend to create fewer jobs than native-owned firms, have comparable pay levels, offer fewer benefits, and engage more in international activities. Prominent tech clusters display quite pronounced shares of immigrant entrepreneurs. Our results suggest that most of the impact of immigrant high-tech entrepreneurship for tech centers happens through the quantity dimension: Silicon Valley and similar tech hubs attract many immigrant founders.