Browsing by Subject "L14"

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  • Gu, Xian; Hasan, Iftekhar; Lu, Haitian (2019)
    Comparative Economic Studies 3 ; September
    Using a comprehensive dataset of corporate lawsuits in China, we investigate the implications of corporate misconduct on the cost of private debt. Evidence reveals that firms involved in litigations obtain subsequent loans with stricter pricing terms, 15.1 percent higher loan spreads, than non-litigated borrowers. Strong political connection and repeated relationship help to flatten the sensitivity of loan pricing to litigation. Nonbank financial institutions react in stronger manner to corporate misconduct than traditional banks in pricing loans. Overall, we show that private debt holders care about borrowers’ wrongdoing in the past.
  • Fang, Yiwei; Francis, Bill; Hasan, Iftekhar (2018)
    Journal of Corporate Finance February ; 2018
    Prior research has demonstrated that CEOs learn privileged information from their social connections. Going beyond the importance of the number of social ties in a CEO's social network, this paper studies the value generated from a diverse social environment. We construct an index of social-network heterogeneity (SNH) that captures the extent to which CEOs are connected to people of different demographic attributes and skill sets. We find that higher CEO SNH leads to greater firm value through the channels of better corporate innovation and diversified M&As. Overall, the evidence suggests that CEOs' exposure to human diversity enhances social learning and creates greater growth opportunities for firms.
  • Itkonen, Juha (2017)
    Bank of Finland Research Discussion Papers 20/2017
    We model a network of linked permit markets to examine efficiency and dependencies between the markets in a competitive equilibrium. Links enable the participants of one emissions trading system to use the permits of another system. To improve the cost-efficiency of the international policy architecture, the Paris climate agreement set out a framework for linking local policies. International trade in permits reduces costs by merging markets, but in a large network it is generally not obvious which markets end up linked in the equilibrium. Also, indirect links might allow foreign regulators to undermine domestic policy outcomes. We apply graph theory to study dependencies between markets and to determine how the network is partitioned into separate market areas. Our main theorem characterizes the dependency structure of the equilibrium in an exogenous trading network. We show that markets merge when they are connected by a particular pattern of links. The results help to identify potential sources of both cost reductions and foreign interference, and to secure the efficiency of climate change policies.
  • Chahine, Salim; Fang, Yiwei; Hasan, Iftekhar; Mazboudi, Mohamad (2019)
    International Review of Financial Analysis November ; 2019
    This paper investigates whether CEOs with high network centrality entrench themselves when taking CSR decisions and how that affects firm value. Evidence portrays that CSR in firms with more central CEOs is negatively associated with firm-value, and this association is mitigated by better corporate governance mechanisms and by geographic areas of higher social capital. This negative association is lower during disasters which reflect periods of positive exogenous shocks to the societal demand for CSR. Furthermore, CSR by more central CEOs is positively associated with future increases in CEO compensation and future improvement in a CEO's network position. The findings reveal that, in general, central CEOs use CSR to entrench themselves and gain private benefits rather than increase shareholder value.
  • Pekkala Kerr, Sari; Kerr, William; Özden, Çağlar; Parsons, Christopher (2017)
    Bank of Finland Research Discussion Papers 2/2017
    Forthcoming in Journal of Economic Perspectives
    The global distribution of talent is highly skewed and the resources available to countries to develop and utilize their best and brightest vary substantially. The migration of skilled workers across countries tilts the deck even further. Using newly available data, we first review the landscape of global talent mobility, which is both asymmetric and rising in importance. We next consider the determinants of global talent flows at the individual and firm levels and sketch some important implications. Third, we review the national gatekeepers for skilled migration and broad differences in approaches used to select migrants for admission. Looking forward, the capacity of people, firms, and countries to successfully navigate this tangled web of global talent will be critical to their success.
  • Pekkala Kerr, Sari; Kerr, William; Özden, Çağlar; Parsons, Christopher (2017)
    Bank of Finland Research Discussion Papers 7/2017
    This paper reviews recent research regarding high-skilled migration. We adopt a data-driven perspective, bringing together and describing several ongoing research streams that range from the construction of global migration databases, to the legal codification of national policies regarding high-skilled migration, to the analysis of patent data regarding cross-border inventor movements. A common theme throughout this research is the importance of agglomeration economies for explaining high-skilled migration. We highlight some key recent findings and outline major gaps that we hope will be tackled in the near future.
  • Milne, Alistair (2005)
    Bank of Finland Research Discussion Papers 16/2005
    The developed world exhibits substantial but poorly understood differences in the efficiency and quality of low-value payment services.This paper compares payments arrangements in the UK, Norway, Sweden, and Finland, and discusses the impact of network effects on incentives to adopt new payments technology.A model is presented, in which private benefits for investment in shared inter-bank payments infrastructure are weak.In contrast, due to 'account externalities', there are strong incentives for investment in intra-bank payment systems.These two features, distinguishing bank payments from other network industries, can help explain some of the observed cross country differences in payments arrangements. Key words: network effects, incentives, payment technology, externalities JEL classification numbers: G21, L14