Browsing by Subject "L25"

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  • Westman, Hanna (2014)
    Bank of Finland Research Discussion Papers 28/2014
    Failure in bank corporate governance has been seen as a contributing factor to excessive risk-taking pre-crisis with devastating implications as risks realised during the financial crisis. Unfortunately, the empirical evidence on the impact of managerial incentives on bank crisis performance is scarce. Moreover, bank strategy has not previously been accounted for. Hence, this paper presents novel findings on drivers for risk-taking and crisis performance. Specifically, I find a positive impact of management ownership in small diversified banks and non-traditional banks, the monitoring of which is challenging due to their opacity. The impact is negative in traditional banks and large diversified banks, indicating that shareholders induce managers to take risk where the safety net creates incentives for risk-shifting to debt holders and taxpayers. These findings have implications for both academic research as well as policy making particularly in the domain of corporate governance. Keywords: banks crisis performance, management ownership, traditional vs. nontraditional banking, diversification, safety net, bank opacity and complexity
  • Ghani, Ejaz; Goswami, Arti Grover; Kerr, William (2017)
    World Bank Economic Review Supplement 1, March
    We investigate the impact of the Golden Quadrilateral (GQ) highway project on the spatial organization and efficiency of manufacturing activity. The GQ project upgraded the quality and width of 3,633 miles of roads in India. We use a difference-in-difference estimation strategy to compare non-nodal districts based upon their distance from the highway system. For the organized portion of the manufacturing sector, we find that GQ led to improvements in both urban and rural areas of nonnodal districts located 0–10 km from GQ. These higher entry rates and increases in plant productivity are not present in districts 10–50 km away. The entry effects are stronger in rural areas of districts, but the differences between urban and rural areas are modest relative to the overall effect. For the unorganized sector, we do not find material effects from the GQ upgrades in either setting. These findings suggest that in the time frames that we can consider—the first five to seven years during and after upgrades—the economic effects of major highway projects contribute modestly to the migration of the organized sector out of Indian cities but are unrelated to the increased urbanization of the unorganized sector.
  • Kauko, Karlo (2007)
    Bank of Finland Research Discussion Papers 11/2007
    Published in Journal of Banking & Finance, Volume 33, Issue 3, March 2009, Pages 546-556
    This paper presents evidence on the impact of managers on cost efficiency in banking. Stochastic frontier analysis is applied to a unique Finnish data set. The paper finds that manager age and education have strong yet complicated effects. University education enhances efficiency if the manager is running a large bank. Managing director changes are systematically followed by efficiency changes. Manager retirement typically causes an efficiency improvement, whereas other manager changes can either improve or weaken efficiency. Keywords: efficiency, banking, managers JEL classification numbers: G21, L25, M19
  • Nurmi, Satu; Vanhala, Juuso; Virén, Matti (2020)
    Bank of Finland Research Discussion Papers 8/2020
    We analyze the demographics of zombie firms and durations of zombie spells as well as their determinants, including an application on public subsidies using firm level population panel data from Finland. Firm-level analysis of firm demographics reveals that zombie-firms, as commonly defined in the literature, are often not truly distressed firms but rather companies with temporarily low revenues relative to interest payments. More importantly, we find that roughly a third of these firms are in fact growing companies and two thirds recover from the zombie status to become healthy firms. We also show that the increase of zombie firms over the past 15 years has mainly been driven by cyclical factors, as opposed to a secular trend. In our policy application on government subsidies to firms, estimation results strongly suggest that subsidy-receiving firms are less likely to die, regardless of the type of subsidy. However, with regard to recovery there is heterogeneity in the effects depending on the type of firm and the type of subsidy received. Thus, we do not find a robust positive association of subsidies with zombie recovery.