Browsing by Subject "O17"

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  • Libman, Alexander; Vollan, Björn (2015)
    BOFIT Discussion Papers 14/2015
    Anti-Western conspiracies are frequently used by Governments to strengthen their power. We investigate the impact of conspiracy thinking on expectations of collusion among individuals in Russia and China. For this purpose, we conduct a novel laboratory experiment to measure expectations of collusion and several survey items related to conspiracy thinking. Our survey results indicate that anti-Western conspiracy thinking is widespread in both countries and correlates with distrust. We find a significant effect of anti-Western conspiracy thinking in China: Anti-Western conspiracy thinking correlates with lower expectations of collusion. We explain this result by stronger ingroup feeling emanating from the anti-Western sentiment. Our paper provides a first step in analyzing the economic implications of conspiracy thinking for society.
  • Pääkkönen, Jenni (2009)
    BOFIT Discussion Papers 15/2009
    Published in Journal of Chinese Economic and Business Studies, Volume 10, Issue 1, February 2012, Pages 1-13
    This paper discusses growth differentials of Chinese provinces geared to agricultural activities and those focusing on industrial production over three decades of economic reform. Following trade theory and endogenous growth theory, we suggest that the fundamental differences between regions arise from their resource allocations at the start of reforms. Thus, capital-abundant regions have tended to specialize in industrial production, while the labor-abundant regions have concentrated on labor-intensive pro- duction (agriculture). Many of China.s agricultural provinces suffer from oversupplies of labor, which has led large numbers of people to migrate within the country to work in non-farming sectors of economy. We show that provinces with high shares of industrial production (the industrial club) have converged, and that agricultural provinces shifting to industrial production have been catching up to initially industrialized provinces. Provinces that have stayed with an agricultural strategy (the agricultural club) show no evidence of convergence and appear to have been left behind in terms of economic development. JEL Classi.cation: O17, O40, O57. Keywords: Growth, Agriculture, Convergence.
  • Pääkkönen, Jenni (2009)
    BOFIT Discussion Papers 1/2009
    Published in Economic Systems, Volume 34, Issue 4, December 2010: 469–479
    This paper reviews the political economy view of economic growth in post-communist economies making the transition to free markets, focusing on the role of economic policy and institutions. We test the hypothesis that better institutions, measured in terms of economic freedom, contribute to growth. The empirical results from the cross-section of transition economies confirm this hypothesis. The paper concludes that non-linearities are present in the growth model and that differences arise depending on how economic well-being is defined. JEL Classification: O17, O40, O57. Key Words: growth, institutions, human capital
  • Voskoboynikov, Ilya B. (2017)
    BOFIT Discussion Papers 18/2017
    Published online in Review of Income and Wealth
    Intensive growth, structural change and expanding informality has characterized many developing and emerging economies in recent decades. Yet most empirical investigations into the relationship between structural change and productivity growth overlook informality. This paper includes the informal sector in an analysis of the effects of structural changes in the Russian economy on aggre-gate labour productivity growth. Using a newly developed dataset for 34 industries covering the period 1995–2012 and applying three alternative approaches, aggregate labour productivity growth is decomposed into intra-industry and inter-industry contributions. All three approaches show that the overall contribution of structural change is growth-enhancing, significant and attenuating over time. Labour reallocation from the formal sector to the informal sector tends to reduce growth through the extension of informal activities with low productivity levels. Sectoral labour reallocation effects are found to be highly sensitive to the methods applied.