Browsing by Subject "DEM"

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  • He, Xinhua; Qin, Duo; Liu, Yimeng (2011)
    BOFIT Discussion Papers 22/2011
    Published in Journal of Chinese Economic and Business Studies, Volume 10, Issue 3, August 2012, Pages 247-266
    The familiar claim of Chinese currency manipulation is generally asserted without reference to empirical evidence. To investigate the legitimacy of the claim, we ask if the undervalued misalignment found in the real effective exchange rate (REER) of the Chinese renminbi (RMB) over the past decade has any recent historical precedents. Four cases are examined: the Japanese yen, the Deutsche mark, the Singapore dollar and the Taiwan dollar. Panel-based misalignment estimates of the REER of the four currencies are obtained using quarterly data from the late 1970s to the early 2000s. Our estimates suggest that there are precedents to the recent misalignment of the RMB in terms of magnitude, duration or breadth of currency coverage, and that a net build-up in foreign asset does not necessarily result in currency misalignment. In addition to finding little empirical justification for the claim of Chinese currency manipulation, we note that REER misalignment runs a risk of propagating inflation in the home economy.
  • Kuo, Biing-Shen; Mikkola, Anne (2000)
    Bank of Finland. Discussion papers 13/2000
    The out-of-sample forecasting performances of two univariate time series presentations for the USD/DEM real exchange rate are compared using quarterly data for the period 1957Q1-1998Q4.The linear AR process is frequently fitted to real exchange rate series because it is sufficient for capturing the reported slow mean reversion in real exchange rates and it has some predictive ability for the long run.A simple nonlinear alternative, the threshold autoregressive (TAR) model, allows for the possibility that there is a band of slow or no convergence around the purchasing power parity level in the real exchange rate, due to transportation costs or other market frictions that create barriers to arbitrage.The TAR model is theoretically and empirically appealing, and it has been fitted to real exchange rates in many recent papers.However, the ultimate test of its usefulness is its out-of-sample forecasting accuracy.We compare the TAR model to its simple linear AR alternative in terms of out-of-sample forecast accuracy. Preliminary results using the RMSE criterion indicate that TAR forecasts are more sensitive to the estimation period and that they involve considerably more uncertainty at long horizons, as compared with the simple AR model.
  • Lanne, Markku; Vesala, Timo (2006)
    Bank of Finland Research Discussion Papers 11/2006
    Ilmestynyt myös European University Institute ; Department of Economics ; EUI working paper ; 2005/19.
    We argue that a transaction tax is likely to amplify, not dampen, volatility in the foreign exchange markets.Our argument stems from the decentralised trading practice and the presumable discrepancy between informed and uninformed traders valuations.Since informed traders valuations are likely to be less dispersed, a transaction tax penalises informed trades disproportionately, leading to increased volatility.Empirical support for this prediction is found by investigating the effect of transaction costs on the volatility of DEM/USD and JPY/USD returns. High-frequency data are used and an increase in transaction costs is found to have a significant positive effect on volatility. Key words: transaction tax, exchange rates, volatility JEL classification numbers: F31, F42, G15, G28