Browsing by Subject "E43"

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  • Korhonen, Iikka; Nuutilainen, Riikka (2016)
    BOFIT Discussion Papers 2/2016
    We estimate several monetary policy rules for Russia for the period 2003–2015. We find that the traditional Taylor rule describes the conduct of monetary policy in Russia reasonably well, whether coefficients are restricted to being the same or allowed to change over the sample period. We find that the Bank of Russia often overshot its inflation target and that extensive overshooting is associated with large depreciations of the ruble, testifying to the importance of the exchange rate in the conduct of monetary policy in Russia.
  • Kortela, Tomi (2016)
    Bank of Finland Research Discussion Papers 19/2016
    Typically a constant – or zero – lower bound for interest rates is applied in shadow rate term structure models. However, euro area yield curve data suggest that a time-varying lower bound might be appropriate for the euro area. I show that this indeed is the case, i.e. a shadow rate model with time-varying lower bound outperforms the constant lower bound model in euro area data. I argue that the time-variation in the lower bound is related to the deposit facility rate and, thus, to monetary policy. This time-variation in the lower bound gives a new channel via which monetary policy may affect the yield curve in a shadow rate model. I show that the intensity of this channel depends on how tightly the lower bound restricts the yield curve, and I argue that this channel has recently become important for the euro area.
  • Crespo Cuaresma, Jesús; Slacik, Tomás (2007)
    BOFIT Discussion Papers 4/2007
    Published in Economics of Transition, Volume 18, Issue 1, January 2010, Pages 123-141
    We propose exploiting the term structure of relative interest rates to obtain estimates of changes in the timing of a currency crisis as perceived by market participants.Our indicator can be used to evaluate the relative probability of a crisis occurring in one week as compared to a crisis happening after one week but in less than a month.We give empirical evidence that the indicator performs well for two important currency crises in Eastern Europe: the crisis in the Czech Republic in 1997 and the Russian crisis in 1998. Keywords: Currency crisis, term structure of interest rates, transition economies. JEL classi.cation: F31, F34, E43.
  • Niu, Linlin; Xu, Xiu; Chen, Ying (2015)
    BOFIT Discussion Papers 12/2015
    We propose the use of a local autoregressive (LAR) model for adaptive estimation and forecasting of three of China’s key macroeconomic variables: GDP growth, inflation and the 7-day interbank lending rate. The approach takes into account possible structural changes in the data-generating process to select a local homogeneous interval for model estimation, and is particularly well-suited to a transition economy experiencing ongoing shifts in policy and structural adjustment. Our results indicate that the proposed method outperforms alternative models and forecast methods, especially for forecast horizons of 3 to 12 months. Our 1-quarter ahead adaptive forecasts even match the performance of the well-known CMRC Langrun survey forecast. The selected homogeneous intervals indicate gradual changes in growth of industrial production driven by constant evolution of the real economy in China, as well as abrupt changes in interestrate and inflation dynamics that capture monetary policy shifts.
  • Kauko, Karlo (2005)
    Bank of Finland Research Discussion Papers 9/2005
    This paper presents econometric analyses on the determination of bank deposit and lending rates using longitudinal Finnish data. Interest rate pass-through is very strong, possibly complete, in the case of lending rates; in the case of deposit rates the pass-through is far from complete, even in the long term.The monetary union has benefited customers by decreasing the average rate on new loans.Credit and interest rate risk premiums are clearly observable in banks' lending rates.The impact of money market rates on loan stock rates seems to have been non-linear; no obvious explanation for this phenomenon has been found. Key words: banking, interest rates JEL classification numbers: G21, E43, E44
  • Granziera, Eleonora; Sihvonen, Markus (2020)
    Bank of Finland Research Discussion Papers 7/2020
    We propose a model in which sticky expectations concerning short-term interest rates generate joint predictability patterns in bond and currency markets. Using our calibrated model, we quantify the effect of this channel and find that it largely explains why short rates and yield spreads predict bond and currency returns. The model also creates the downward sloping term structure of carry trade returns documented by Lustig et al. (2019), difficult to replicate in a rational expectations framework. Consistent with the model, we find that variables that predict bond and currency returns also predict survey-based expectational errors concerning interest and FX rates. The model explains why monetary policy induces drift patterns in bond and currency markets and predicts that long-term rates are a better gauge of market’s short rate expectations than previously thought.
  • Nuutilainen, Riikka; Korhonen, Iikka (2017)
    Russian Journal of Economics 4
    BOFIT Policy Brief 9/2017
    This study estimates whether the monetary policy rules of Bank of Russia have changed recently. Russia has moved towards inflation targeting over the past years, which is reflected in our empirical estimations. We start by estimating various monetary policy rules for Russia, concluding that a variant of the Taylor rule depicts Bank of Russia's monetary policy over the past decade well. Moreover, there have been two clear breaks in the coefficients of the estimated monetary policy rule, possibly signifying a shift towards traditional inflation targeting and also the current recent economic turbulence.
  • Ollikka, Kimmo; Tukiainen, Janne (2013)
    Bank of Finland Research Discussion Papers 21/2013
    We study whether the mechanism design in the central bank liquidity auctions matters for the interbank money market interest rate levels and volatility. Furthermore, we compare different mechanisms to sell liquidity in terms of revenue, efficiency and auction stage interest rate levels and volatility. Most importantly, we ask which mechanism is the best at implementing the target policy interest rates to the interbank market and what are the trade-offs involved. We construct a relatively general model of strategic bidding with interdependent valuations, and combine it with a stylized model of the interbank market. The novel feature of the model is that the expectations of the interbank market outcomes determine the valuations in the liquidity auctions. The model captures the relevant features of how the European Central Bank sells liquidity. We use simulations to compare discriminatory price, uniform price and Vickrey auctions to a posted price mechanism with full allotment. In order to analyze interactions between the primary and the secondary market under four different mechanisms, we need to make a lot of assumptions and simplifications. Given this caveat, we find that posted prices with full allotment is clearly the superior alternative in terms of implementing the policy interest rate to the interbank markets. This comes at the cost of less revenue compared to the revenue maximizing discriminatory price auction, but surprisingly, will not result in efficiency losses compared even to the Vickrey auction. Keywords: ECB liquidity auctions, Interbank markets, Mechanism design, Multi-unit auctions, Monetary policy, Posted-Prices. JEL: C63, C72, D02, D44, D47, D53, E43, E44, E52, E58, G21.
  • Égert, Balázs; Leonard, Carol S. (2007)
    BOFIT Discussion Papers 9/2007
    Published in Open Economies Review, Volume 19, Issue 2, April 2008, Pages 147-165
    In this paper we explore the evidence that would establish that Dutch disease is at work in, or poses a threat to, the Kazakh economy.Assessing the mechanism by which fluctuations in the price of oil can damage non-oil manufacturing-and thus long-term growth prospects in an economy that relies heavily on oil production-we find that non-oil manufacturing has so far been spared the perverse effects of oil price increases from 1996 to 2005.The real exchange rate in the open sector has appreciated over the last couple of years, largely due to the appreciation of the nominal exchange rate.We analyze to what extent this appreciation is linked to movements in oil prices and oil revenues.Econometric evidence from the monetary model of the exchange rate and a variety of real exchange rate models show that the rise in the price of oil and in oil revenues might be linked to an appreciation of the U.S. dollar exchange rate of the oil and non-oil sectors.But appreciation is mainly limited to the real effective exchange rate for oil sector and is statistically insignificant for non-oil manufacturing.Key words: price level, inflation, Balassa-Samuelson, tradables, house prices, regulated prices, Europe, transition JEL codes: E43, E50, E52, C22, G21, O52
  • Evans, George W.; Honkapohja, Seppo; Mitra, Kaushik (2016)
    Bank of Finland Research Discussion Papers 25/2016
    Stagnation as the new norm and fiscal policy are examined in a New Keynesian model with adaptive learning determining expectations. We impose inflation and consumption lower bounds, which can be relevant when agents are pessimistic. The inflation target is locally stable under learning. Pessimistic initial expectations may sink the economy into steady-state stagnation with deflation. The deflation rate can be near zero for discount factors near one or if credit frictions are present. Following a severe pessimistic expectations shock a large temporary fiscal stimulus is needed to avoid or emerge from stagnation. A modest stimulus is sufficient if implemented early.
  • Mitra, Kaushik; Evans, George W.; Honkapohja, Seppo (2012)
    Bank of Finland Research Discussion Papers 5/2012
    Published as Fiscal Policy Multipliers in an RBC Model with Learning, Macroeconomic Dynamics, 2019 ; 23 ; 1.
    Using the standard real business cycle model with lump-sum taxes, we analyze the impact of fiscal policy when agents form expectations using adaptive learning rather than rational expectations (RE). The output multipliers for government purchases are significantly higher under learning, and fall within empirical bounds reported in the literature (in sharp contrast to the implausibly low values under RE). Effectiveness of fiscal policy is demonstrated during times of economic stress like the recent Great Recession. Finally it is shown how learning can lead to dynamics empirically documented during episodes of "fiscal consolidations." JEL classification: E62, D84, E21, E43 Key words: Government Purchases, Expectations, Output Multiplier, Fiscal Consolidation, Taxation
  • Schaling, Eric; Eijffinger, Sylvester; Tesfaselassie, Mewael (2004)
    Suomen Pankin keskustelualoitteita 23/2004
    In this paper we incorporate the term structure of interest rates into a standard inflation forecast targeting framework.Learning about the transmission process of monetary policy is introduced by having heterogeneous agents - ie central bank and private agents - who have different information sets about the future sequence of short-term interest rates.We analyse inflation forecast targeting in two environments.One in which the central bank has perfect knowledge, in the sense that it understands and observes the process by which private sector interest rate expectations are generated, and one in which the central bank has imperfect knowledge.In the case of imperfect knowledge, the central bank has to learn about private sector interest rate expectations, as the latter affect the impact of monetary policy through the expectations theory of the term structure of interest rates.Here, following Evans and Honkapohja (2001), the learning scheme we investigate is that of least-squares learning (recursive OLS) using the Kalman filter.We find that optimal monetary policy under learning is a policy that separates estimation and control.Therefore, this model suggests that the practical relevance of the breakdown of the separation principle and the need for experimentation in policy may be limited. Key words: learning, rational expectations, separation principle, Kalman filter, term structure of interest rates JEL classification numbers: C53, E43, E52, F33
  • Bjørnland, Hilde C.; Leitemo, Kai (2005)
    Bank of Finland Research Discussion Papers 17/2005
    Published in Journal of Monetary Economics, Volume 56, Issue 2, March 2009, Pages 275-282
    We estimate the interdependence between US monetary policy and the S&P 500 using structural VAR methodology.A solution is proposed to the simultaneity problem of identifying monetary and stock price shocks by using a combination of short-run and long-run restrictions that maintains the qualitative properties of a monetary policy shock found in the established literature (CEE 1999).We find great interdependence between interest rate setting and stock prices.Stock prices immediately fall by 1.5 per cent due to a monetary policy shock that raises the federal funds rate by ten basis points.A stock price shock increasing stock prices by one per cent leads to an increase in the interest rate of five basis points.Stock price shocks are orthogonal to the information set in the VAR model and can be interpreted as non-fundamental shocks.We attribute a major part of the surge in stock prices at the end of the 1990s to these non-fundamental shocks. Key words: VAR, monetary policy, asset prices, identification JEL classification numbers: E61, E52, E43
  • Mehrotra, Aaron; Moessner, Richhild; Shu, Chang (2019)
    BOFIT Discussion Papers 20/2019
    We analyse how movements in the components of sovereign bond yields in the United States affect long-term rates in 10 advanced and 21 emerging economies. The paper documents significant global spillovers from both the expectations and term premia components of long-term rates in the United States. We find that spillovers to domestic long-term rates in emerging economies from the US expectations components tend to be more sizeable than those from the US term premia. Finally, spillovers from US term premia are larger when an emerging economy displays greater macro-financial vulnerabilities.
  • Schaling, Eric (2003)
    Suomen Pankin keskustelualoitteita; Bank of Finland. Discussion papers 20/2003
    In this paper we analyse disinflation policy in two environments. In the first, the central bank has perfect knowledge, in the sense that it understands and observes the process by which private sector inflation expectations are generated; in the second, the central bank has to learn the private sector inflation forecasting rule.With imperfect knowledge, results depend on the learning scheme that is employed.Here, the learning scheme we investigate is that of least-squares learning (recursive OLS) using the Kalman filter.A novel feature of a learning-based policy as against the central bank's disinflation policy under perfect knowledge is that the degree of monetary accommodation (the extent to which the central bank accommodates private sector inflation expectations) is no longer constant across the disinflation, but becomes state-dependent.This means that the central bank's behaviour changes during the disinflation as it collects more information. Key words: learning, rational expectations, separation principle, Kalman filter, time-varying parameters, optimal control JEL classification numbers: C53, E43, E52, F33
  • Anttila, Juho (2018)
    Bank of Finland Research Discussion Papers 12/2018
    I estimate the effects of conventional and unconventional monetary policy in the euro area by using a factor-augmented vector autoregression.I complement the standard monetary policy analysis using the short rate with models where the shadow rates by Kortela (2016) and Wu and Xia (2017) are used as proxies for unconventional monetary policy. I quantify the effects of unanticipated monetary policy shocks using impulse response functions, forecast-error variance decompositions, and counterfactual simulations. The results indicate that unconventional monetary policy shocks have similar, expansionary effects on the economy as conventional monetary policy shocks.
  • Rautureau, Nicolas (2004)
    Suomen Pankin keskustelualoitteita 12/2004
    This paper has two objectives.The first is to identify the long-term public perception of monetary policy.The second is to identify the relationship between this perception and long-term bond rates.For German data, the use of a two-factor model of the term structure results in the best forecast of long-term interest rates for the period between January 1975 and January 2003.It also allows us to introduce as the second factor the long-term perception of inflation as a characteristic of the behaviour of monetary authorities.Key words: expectations hypothesis, monetary policy, changepoints JEL classification numbers: E43
  • Ravenna, Federico; Seppälä, Juha (2006)
    Bank of Finland Research Discussion Papers 25/2006
    We study the rejection of the expectations hypothesis within a New Keynesian business cycle model.Earlier research has shown that the Lucas general equilibrium asset pricing model can account for neither sign nor magnitude of average risk premia in forward prices, and is unable to explain rejection of the expectations hypothesis.We show that a New Keynesian model with habitformation preferences and a monetary policy feedback rule produces an upwardsloping average term structure of interest rates, procyclical interest rates, and countercyclical term spreads.In the model, as in U.S. data, inverted term structure predicts recessions.Most importantly, a New Keynesian model is able to account for rejections of the expectations hypothesis.Contrary to earlier work, we identify systematic monetary policy as a key factor behind this result.Rejection of the expectation hypothesis can be entirely explained by the volatility of just two real shocks which affect technology and preferences. Keywords: term structure of interest rates, monetary policy, sticky prices, habit formation, expectations hypothesis JEL classification numbers: E43, E44, E5, G12
  • Funke, Michael; Li, Xiang; Tsang, Andrew (2019)
    BOFIT Discussion Papers 23/2019
    This paper studies monetary policy transmission in China’s peer-to-peer lending market. Using spectral measures of causality, we explore the impacts of Chinese monetary policy shocks on China’s P2P market interest rates and lending amounts. The estimation results indicate significant spectral Granger causality from monetary policy surprises to P2P lending rates for borrowers, but not the reverse. Unlike the lending channel for traditional banks, monetary policy shocks do not Granger-cause the credit amount in the P2P lending market.
  • Ravenna, Federico; Seppälä, Juha (2007)
    Bank of Finland Research Discussion Papers 18/2007
    Within a New Keynesian business cycle model, we study variables that are normally unobservable but are very important for the conduct of monetary policy, namely expected inflation and inflation risk premia. We solve the model using a third-order approximation that allows us to study time-varying risk premia. Our model is consistent with rejection of the expectations hypothesis and the business-cycle behaviour of nominal interest rates in US data. We find that inflation risk premia are very small and display little volatility. Hence, monetary policy authorities can use the difference between nominal and real interest rates from index-linked bonds as a proxy for inflation expectations. Moreover, for short maturities current inflation is a good predictor of inflation risk premia. We also find that short-term real interest rates and expected inflation are significantly negatively correlated and that short-term real interest rates display greater volatility than expected inflation. These results are consistent with empirical studies that use survey data and index-linked bonds to obtain measures of expected inflation and real interest rates. Finally, we show that our economy is consistent with the Mundell-Tobin effect: increases in inflation are associated with higher nominal interest rates, but lower real interest rates. Keywords: term structure of interest rates, monetary policy, expected inflation, inflation risk premia, Mundell-Tobin effect JEL classification numbers: E5, E43, E44, G12