Browsing by Subject "G02"

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  • Fromlet, Hubert (2014)
    BOFIT Policy Brief 15/2014
    During and after the Central Committee’s Third Plenum in November 2013, China announced far-reaching reforms in the spheres of marketization and economic deregulation that included financial markets. While the speed of the rollout of China’s planned reforms is still unknown, officials repeatedly reference the great opportunities for guiding China onto a healthier, more sustainable social and economic track. The risks of such ambitious marketization and deregulation plans need to be considered in the context of speed and sequencing of reforms of the financial sector. We currently lack the skills for overcoming the famously low predictability of financial crises. The areas for skill improvement largely relate to market psychology (behavioral finance) and the understanding of history and macrofinancial aggregates. The much-undervalued discipline of behavioral finance has started to come into its own over the past 10 to 15 years, including the awarding of the 2013 Nobel Prize Robert in Economics to Robert Shiller for his efforts at understanding the psychology of financial markets. This year’s Nobel Prize winner, Jean Tirole, also considers behavioral aspects in his work. Sweden has had two serious banking crises in the past 30 years. The first – and most serious – crisis occurred in the early 1990s, while a smaller crisis took place at the end of the last decade. Both were foreseeable. The first crisis emerged as Swedish banking entered uncharted deregulation waters, a situation Chinese reformers will themselves inevitably confront. Swedish research findings with respect to sequencing, speed of reforms and behavioral finance apply nicely to the Chinese discussion. The italicized discussion focuses on what the Swedish deregulation experience means for Chinese policy choices, but most of these observations are generally relevant for policymakers in emerging markets in Asia and elsewhere. Publication keywords: financial deregulation, Asia, Sweden
  • Oinonen, Sami; Virén, Matti (2021)
    Economia Internazionale / International Economics 2
    Published in BoF DP 24/2018 http://urn.fi/URN:NBN:fi:bof-201811202136
    In this paper, we examine how professional forecasters’ expectations and expectation uncertainty have reacted to the ECB’s interest rate and non-conventional monetary policy decisions during the period 1999-2017. The analysis makes use of a conventional intervention dummy -type set up. The results indicate that expectations have been sensitive to policy actions, but forecasters’ reactions are quite different and, as a rule, do not seem to follow the predictions of a standard New Keynesian model. Also the relationship between inflation and output forecasts does not seem to follow a Phillips curve relationship. Rather, the forecasters interpret policy actions as signals of ECB’s inside information. Thus, for instance, cuts in policy rates are interpreted as the CB’s information of worse than generally assumed cyclical situation rather than the eventual positive effects of lower interest rates. The magnitude of expectation effects depends much of the way in which other macro variables are controlled. Even so the basic feature of these effects remain the same.
  • Oinonen, Sami; Paloviita, Maritta; Viren, Matti (2018)
    Bank of Finland Research Discussion Papers 24/2018
    Published in Economia Internazionale / International Economics 2 ; 2021.
    In this paper, we examine how professional forecasters’ expectations and expectation uncertainty have reacted to the ECB’s interest rate decisions and non-conventional monetary policy measures during the period 1999-2017. The analysis makes use of a conventional dif-in-dif type set up with different time series tools. The results indicate that expectations have been sensitive to policy actions, but all forecasters’ reactions do not seem to follow the basic predictions of a standard New Keynesian model. Also the relationship between inflation and output forecasts does not seem to follow a Phillips curve type relationship. Moreover, short- and long term reactions to policy are often weakly related and of different sign. Interestingly, subjective forecast uncertainty measures are very sensitive to policy measures. Thus, there seems to be much heterogeneity in forecasters’ reactions to most policy decisions. All uncertainty measures, including long-term inflation uncertainty, have increased over time. This has to be taken into account when considering the anchoring of inflation expectations to the inflation target.
  • Gwilym, Owain Ap; Wang, Qvigwei; Hasan, Iftekhar; Xie, Ru (2013)
    Bank of Finland Research Discussion Papers 10/2013
    Published in European Financial Management, Volume 22, Issue 3, 1 June 2016: 427-449
    Using a novel proxy of investors' speculative demand constructed from online search interest in "concept stocks", we examine how speculative demand affects the returns and trading volume of Chinese stock indices. We find that returns and trading volume increase with the contemporaneous speculative demand. In addition, the high speculative demand causes lower near future returns, while recent high past returns cause the high speculative demand. Moreover, the speculative demand explains more variation in returns and trading volume of A shares (more populated by retail investors) than B shares (less populated by retail investors). Our findings support the attention theory of Barber and Odean (2008). Keywords: Investor Attention, Speculative Demand, Concept Stock, Market Returns, Trading Volume JEL: G02, G12, G14