Browsing by Subject "N13"

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  • Kauko, Karlo (2018)
    Scandinavian Economic History Review 1; January ; 2018
    Chartalist theories assume the government determines the currency used by the public. Finland’s experience following the Russo-Swedish war in 1808–1809 would seem to contradict the chartalist view. Having become a Grand Duchy under Russia, the Finnish Government sought to replace Swedish riksdalers in circulation with roubles. However, due to a resilient trade surplus with Sweden and the resulting flood of Swedish money into Finland, bans on the riksdaler were largely ineffective. Taxation proved a particularly clumsy tool for leveraging the switch to roubles. Taxpayers almost forced the government to accept payments in a foreign currency. Even the government had to use Swedish money. Issuing roubles was of limited use. As a result, the rouble failed to establish itself as Finland’s main currency until the introduction of a silver standard in 1840–1842.
  • Arola, Mika (2006)
    Suomen Pankki. E 37
    The main objective of the study is to evaluate the Finnish central government's foreign borrowing between the years 1862 and 1938. Most of this period was characterised by deep capital market integration that bears resemblance to the liberal world financial order at the turn of the millennium.The main aim is to analyse the credit risk associated with the state and its determination by evaluating the world financial market centres' perception of Finland.By doing this, the study is also expected to provide an additional dimension to Finland's political and economic history by incorporating into the research the assessments of international capital markets regarding Finland during a period that witnessed profound political and economic changes in Finnish society.The evaluation of the credit risk mainly relies on exchange-rate risk free time series of the state's foreign bonds.They have been collected from quotations in the stock exchanges in Helsinki, Hamburg, Paris and London.In addition, it investigates Finland's exposure to short-term debt and Moody's credit ratings assigned to Finland.The study emphasises the importance of the political risk. It suggests that the hey-day of the state's reliance on foreign capital markets took place during last few decades of the 19th century when Finland enjoyed a wide autonomy in the Russian Empire and prudently managed its economy, highlighted in Finland's adherence to the international gold standard.Political confrontations in Finland and, in particular, in Russia and the turbulence of the world financial system prevented the return of this beneficial position again.Through its issuance of foreign bonds the state was able to import substantial amounts of foreign capital, which was sorely needed to foster economic development in Finland.Moreover, the study argues that the state's presence in the western capital markets not only had economic benefits, but it also increased the international awareness of Finland's distinct and separate status in the Russian Empire and later underlined its position as an independent republic. Keywords: credit risk, government borrowing, financial market, government bonds, state finances JEL classification: E65, G15, H63, N13
  • Chadha, Jagjit S.; Newby, Elisa (2013)
    Bank of Finland Research Discussion Papers 20/2013
    This paper assesses Revolutionary and Napoleonic wartime economic policy. Suspension of gold convertibility in 1797 allowed the Bank of England to nurture British monetary orthodoxy. The Order of the Privy Council suspended gold payments on Bank of England notes and afforded simultaneous protection to the government and the Bank in pursuit of the conflicting goals of price stability and war finance. The government, the Bank of England and the commercial banks formed a loose alliance drawing on due political and legal processes and also paid close attention to public opinion. We suggest that the ongoing solvency of the Bank of England was facilitated by suspension and allowed the Bank to continue to make substantial profits throughout the Wars. It became acceptable for merchants to continue to trade with non-convertible Bank of England notes and for the government to finance the war effort, even with significant recourse to unfunded debt. These aspects combined to create a suspension of convertibility that did not undermine the currency. By contrast, the Assignats debacle had cost the French monetary system its reputation in the last decade of the 18th century and so Napoleonic finance had to evolve within a more rigid and limiting framework. JEL Classification: C61, E31, E4, E5, N13 Keywords: Monetary Orthodoxy, Suspension of Convertibility, War Finance
  • Gregg, Amanda; Nafziger, Steven (2020)
    BOFIT Discussion Papers 26/2020
    Enterprise creation, destruction, and evolution support the transition to modern economic growth, yet these processes are poorly understood in industrializing contexts. We investigate Imperial Russia’s industrial development at the firm-level by examining entry, exit, and persistence of corporations. Relying on newly developed balance sheet panel data from every active Russian corporation (N > 2500) between 1899 and 1914, we examine the characteristics of entering and exiting corporations, how new entrants evolved, and the impact of founder identity on subsequent outcomes. Russian corporations operated flexibly and competitively, conditional on overcoming distortionary institutional barriers to entry that slowed the emergence of these leading firms in the Imperial economy.