Browsing by Subject "O16"

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  • Fungáčová, Zuzana; Weill, Laurent (2014)
    BOFIT Policy Brief 8/2014
    Financial inclusion contributes to economic growth and poverty reduction. We examine financial inclusion levels in twelve Asian countries. To do so, we utilize data from the World Bank Global Findex database for 2011. We find large cross-country differences for the three main indicators of financial inclusion (ownership of a bank account, savings on a bank account, use of bank credit) and observe that ownership of a bank account is more common in high-income countries. However, the pattern of financial inclusion in terms of saving on a bank account or using formal credit differs across countries and is not related to per capita income. There are nonetheless major similarities in the motives for financial exclusion and in the alternative sources of borrowing in Asian countries. Voluntary financial exclusion is more prominent than involuntary exclusion, the main reason being lack of money. We also find that borrowing from family or friends is the most common way of obtaining credit and that relying on alternative private lenders is quite limited.
  • Mayes, David G. (2004)
    Suomen Pankin keskustelualoitteita 4/2004
    Published in Journal of Banking and Finance, Vol. 29, No. 1 (Special Issue), January 2005: 161-181
    In the light of the inequity of the way losses from bank insolvencies and their avoidance through intervention by the authorities have been distributed over creditors, depositors, owners and the population at large in transition and emerging economies, this paper explores a number of regulatory reforms that would alter the balance between seeking to avoid insolvency and lowering the costs of insolvency should it occur.In particular it considers whether a lex specialis for dealing with banks that are in trouble through prompt corrective action and if necessary resolving them if their net worth falls to zero, at little or no cost to the taxpayer can be applied in the institutional framework of transition and emerging economies. Key words: insolvency, banks, transition, emerging economies JEL classification numbers: K23, G21, O16, G28, E53
  • Klein, Paul-Olivier; Weill, Laurent (2018)
    BOFIT Discussion Papers 15/2018
    This paper analyses the effect of bank profitability on economic growth. While policymakers have shown major concerns for low levels of bank profitability, there are no empirical studies on the growth effects of bank profitability. To fill this gap, we investigate the impact of bank profitability on economic growth using a sample of 133 countries during the period 1999–2013 with several empirical approaches. Our first major conclusion is that a high current level of bank profitability contributes positively to economic growth. Our second conclusion is that the past level of bank profitability exerts a negative influence on economic growth leading to the absence of significance for the overall bank profitability. Hence, the positive impact of bank profitability on economic growth is short-lived. These findings are robust to a battery of robustness checks, including those using alternative measures for profitability and growth.
  • Delis, Manthos D.; Hasan, Iftekhar; Kazakis, Pantelis (2012)
    Bank of Finland Research Discussion Papers 18/2012
    Published in Review of Finance, 18,5,2014: 1811-1846
    This paper provides cross-country evidence that variations in bank regulatory policies result in differences in income distribution. In particular, the overall liberalization of banking systems decreases the Gini coefficient and the Theil index significantly. However, this effect fades away for countries with low levels of economic and institutional development and for market-based economies. Among the different liberalization policies, the most significant negative effect on inequality is that of credit controls, which also seem to have a lasting effect on the Gini coefficient. Banking supervision and the abolition of interest rate controls also have a negative yet short-run impact on income inequality. A notable finding is that liberalization of securities markets increases income inequality substantially and over a long time span, suggesting that securitization widens the distribution of income. We contend that these findings have new implications for the effects of bank regulations, besides those related to their impact on financial stability. Keywords: Bank regulations; Income inequality; Cross-country panel data; Instrumental variables; Panel VAR JEL classification: G28; O15; O16
  • Hasan, Iftekhar; Kobeissi, Nada; Wang, Haizhi; Zhou, Mingming (2015)
    BOFIT Discussion Papers 11/2015
    Published in Pacific Economic Review, Volume 20, Issue 3, pages 487–510, August 2015.
    This paper provides an empirical examination of the regional banking structures in China and their effects on entrepreneurial activity. Using a panel of 27 provinces and four directly controlled municipalities from 1997 through 2008, we find that the presence of large banking institutions negatively correlates with small business development in local markets and that this negative relation is driven mainly by participation of large banks in the short-term loan market. Rural banking institutions, in contrast, are found to promote regional entrepreneurial activity. Moreover, large state banks facilitate small business development in concentrated markets. When we interact measures of banking financing by state banks and rural banking institutions with a set of provincial level marketization indexes, we find that extensive marketization, factor market development, and sophistication of legal frameworks mitigate the negative effect of large state banks on small business development. In provinces with advanced market development, efficient factor markets, and favorable institutional settings, the positive effect of rural banking institutions on small business growth is even stronger. Finally, we present evidence that banks do a better job of promoting regional entrepreneurship when it occurs in conjunction with policies to foster innovation activity and assure protection of intellectual property rights.
  • Stolbov, Mikhail (2015)
    BOFIT Discussion Papers 15/2015
    Causality between the ratio of domestic private credit to GDP and growth in real GDP per capita is investigated in a country-by-country time-series framework for 24 OECD economies over the period 1980–2013. The proposed threefold methodology to test for causal linkages integrates (i) lag-augmented VAR Granger causality tests, (ii) Breitung-Candelon causality tests in the frequency domain, and (iii) testing for causal inference based on a fully modified OLS (FMOLS) approach. For 12 of 24 countries in the sample, the three tests yield uniform results in terms of causality presence (absence) and direction. Causality running from credit depth to economic growth is found for the UK, Australia, Switzerland, and Greece. The findings lend no support to the view that financial development shifts from a supply-leading to demand-following pattern as economic development proceeds. The aggregate results mesh well with the current discussion on “too much finance” and disintermediation effects. However, idiosyncratic country determinants also appear significant.
  • Goodell, John W.; Goyal, Abhinav; Hasan, Iftekhar (2020)
    Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money January
    Previous research finds market financing is favored over relationship financing in environments of better governance, since the transaction costs to investors of vetting asymmetric information are thereby reduced. For industries supplying public goods, for-profits rely on market financing, while nonprofits rely on relationships with donors. This suggests that for-profits will be more inclined than nonprofits to improve financial transparency. We examine the impact of for-profit versus nonprofit status on the financial transparency of firms engaged with supplying public goods. There are relatively few industries that have large number of both for-profit and nonprofit firms across countries. However, the microfinance industry provides the opportunity of a large number of both for-profit and nonprofit firms in relatively equal numbers, across a wide array of countries. Consistent with our prediction, we find that financial transparency is positively associated with a for-profit status. Results will be of broad interest both to scholars interested in the roles of transparency and transaction costs on market versus relational financing
  • Banerjee, Ryan; Hofmann, Boris; Mehrotra, Aaron (2020)
    BOFIT Discussion Papers 6/2020
    Using firm-level data for 18 major global economies, we find that the exchange rate affects corporate investment through a financial channel: exchange rate depreciation dampens corporate investment through firm leverage and FX debt. These findings are consistent with the predictions of a stylised model of credit risk in which exchange rates can affect investment through FX debt or borrowing in local currency from foreign lenders. Empirically, the channel is more pronounced in emerging market economies (EMEs), reflecting their greater dependence on foreign funding and their less developed financial systems. Moreover, we find that exchange rate depreciation induces highly leveraged firms to increase their cash holdings, supporting from a different angle the notion of a financial channel of the exchange rate. Overall, these findings suggest that the large depreciation of EME currencies since 2011 was probably a significant amplifying factor in the recent investment slowdown in these economies.
  • Herrala, Risto; Turk-Ariss, Rima (2012)
    BOFIT Discussion Papers 29/2012
    Published in Journal of International Money and Finance, Volume 64, June 2016, Pages 1–15 as "Capital accumulation in a politically unstable region"
    The Arab Spring is a clear indicator of the urgency of achieving inclusive growth and ensuring job creation in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region, where private sector development is still hindered by limited access to credit. Following Kiyotaki and Moore's (1997) seminal model, we apply a novel methodological approach to a unique data set of MENA firms to estimate credit limits and their impacts on capital accumulation. Notably, we find higher credit limits in countries where the Arab Spring erupted than in other MENA countries and that their marginal effect on capital accumulation has been statistically and economically significant. Keywords: financing constraints, credit limits, MENA countries JEL: G31, L20, O16
  • Pessarossi, Pierre; Weill, Laurent (2012)
    BOFIT Discussion Papers 21/2012
    Published in Journal of Economics and Business, Volume 70, November–December 2013, Pages 27–42
    We study the consequences of CEO turnover announcements on the stock prices of firms in China, where most listed firms remain majority-owned by the state. Our proposition is that state ownership may affect stock market reaction to CEO replacement because state-owned firms often pursue multiple, potentially contradictory, objectives, i.e. economic performance and social objectives. Applying standard event study methodology to a sample of 1,094 announcements from 2002 to 2010, we find that CEO turnover typically produces a positive stock market reaction. The reaction is significantly positive, however, only for enterprises owned by the central government, and not significant for enterprises owned by local governments or privately owned enterprises. These results suggest that a CEO turnover in a central state-owned enterprise signals a renewed commitment to the economic performance objective by state officials. The small size of CEO labor market suggests that other shareholders have a relatively small pool of CEO talent to proceed to managerial improvement when a CEO turnover takes place. JEL Classification: G30; M51; P34; O16 Keywords: CEO turnover; corporate governance; state ownership; China; event study
  • Fungáčová, Zuzana; Kerola, Eeva; Weill, Laurent (2019)
    BOFIT Discussion Papers 21/2019
    Accepted for publication in Journal of Financial Services Research
    This paper investigates how past experience with banking crises influences an individual’s trust in banks. We combine data on banking crises for the period 1970–2014 with individual data on trust in banks for 52 countries. We find that experiencing a banking crisis diminishes a person’s trust in banks, and that high exposure to banking crises is negatively related to trust in banks. An individual’s age at the time of the crisis is important, and significant for individuals between 41 and 60 years of age at the time of the banking crisis. Both severe and mild crises diminish trust in banks, but a severe banking crisis hits also young people’s trust, while less severe banking crises mainly degrade trust of more mature people. The detrimental effect for trust in banks seems to be connected specifically to systemic banking crises. Other types of financial crises incur a less significant effect. Overall, our results indicate that banking crises generate previously unrecognized costs for the economy in the form of a lasting reduction of trust in banks.
  • Haaparanta, Pertti; Puhakka, Mikko (2004)
    BOFIT Discussion Papers 4/2004
    We introduce endogenous time preference via investment in patience (farsightedness) in an overlapping generations growth model to study development traps.There is no investment in patience, if the economy is very poor, while if it is wealthy enough there is always such investment.We explore the conditions for the existence of the development trap, and study in detail a robust example of an economy with traps.It does not exist, if the economy's total factor productivity is large enough.Our results illustrate the complementarity between physical investment and investment in farsightedness.Our model may also explain why economic growth is affected by initial conditions.In addition we show that increased international capital mobility does not necessarily help economies to escape from development traps. JEL classification: I30, O11, O16 Keywords:development trap, overlapping generations
  • Kinoshita, Yuko; Campos, Nauro F. (2004)
    BOFIT Discussion Papers 10/2004
    This paper investigates the importance of factor endowment vis-à-vis institutions in explaining the locational choice of foreign investors during the 1990s.Using dynamic panel estimation on data for transition economies, we find that low labour costs, bureaucratic efficiency ("institutions"), agglomeration economies and natural resource abundance are key factors explaining foreign investors' decisions.However, sampling proves fundamental as these overall determinants mask deep and, so far empirically unexplored, differences between groups of recipient countries.For example, for the former Soviet Union economies we estimate that labour costs are no longer crucial, but abundance of natural resources and (interestingly) lower levels of human capital are.For Eastern Europe, we find that external liberalisation (one aspect of economic reform) is crucial in foreign investor's decisions.The main message is that minimising sampling biases and accounting for previously omitted variables yields a different, much richer picture than previously available. JEL classification: F21, O16, C33, P27 Keywords: Foreign direct investment, dynamic panel estimation, transition economies
  • Ikonen, Pasi (2017)
    Bank of Finland. Scientific monographs. E 51
    This thesis applies several econometric methods to a selection of country panels to study how growth is influenced by financial development and government debt. The first part presents the thesis discussion, including a synthesis on financial development, government debt, money supply, and economic growth. The second part deepens the discussion with three stand-alone essays. The first essay models how financial development affects growth through utilization of technological innovation. Based on explicit modeling of the innovation channel of finance, the results show a significant and positive sign for the interaction term between the measure of a country’s own innovation and financial development in the most important specifications. This suggests that the innovation channel of finance is likely to be positively relevant to growth. The second essay examines effects of venture capital investment on economic growth in a similar framework. The findings demonstrate that the interaction of venture capital with innovation has a positive and statistically significant coefficient. Further, the joint impact related to venture capital and its interactions is positive in most specifications, suggesting that venture capital is probably a relevant factor for growth. The third essay delves deeply in the effects of general government debt and general government external debt on growth of real GDP. It explores the long-standing endogeneity problem, includes other relevant debt concepts besides government total debt, revisits the issue whether there are threshold values for the government debt ratio, examines the effect of debt on GDP components and structure, uses timely and extensive datasets and extensive robustness analysis, and runs meta-regressions of the results of this and a many of other studies. Even with correction for endogeneity, the study finds modest evidence of a negative and significant growth impact for government debt. The evidence is not robust over all samples and specifications. The final essay also reports evidence of a negative and significant effect of government external debt in the sample of developed economies. The findings overall comport with those of recent papers that conclude that there is no universal threshold value for a government debt ratio that would hold across all countries. Further, government debt appears to decrease the private-investment-to-GDP ratio, but increases the GDP ratio for household consumption. The meta-regression analysis shows that the study’s results on how specification features affect the estimate of the government debt coefficient are broadly in line with those of other studies.
  • Kurronen, Sanna (2012)
    BOFIT Discussion Papers 6/2012
    Published in Emerging Markets Review, Volume 23, June 2015: 208–229.
    This paper examines financial sector characteristics in resource-dependent economies. Using a unique dataset covering 133 countries, we present empirical evidence that the banking sector tends to be smaller in resource-dependent economies, even when controlling for several other factors which have been shown to have a significant effect on financial sector development in previous studies. Moreover, the threshold level at which the increasing resource-dependence begins to be harmful for domestic banking sector is very low. We also find evidence that the use of market-based and foreign financing is more common in resource-dependent economies. Further, we argue that a relatively small financial sector used to cater the needs of the resource sector might be unfavorable for emerging businesses, thereby hampering economic diversification and reinforcing the resource curse. resource dependence, resource curse, financial sector, banks, panel data, G20, O16, O57, Q32
  • Lv, Bingyang; Liu, Yongzheng; Li, Yan; Ding, Siying (2018)
    BOFIT Discussion Papers 20/2018
    This paper explores how fiscal incentives offered to local governments in China affect investment rates in their jurisdictions. Theoretically, we build a simple fiscal competition model to establish the linkage between local fiscal incentives and expenditure policy and consequently, capital movement. The key prediction of the model, borne out by data from Chinese provinces spanning 2004–2013, is that an increase in the local corporate income tax-sharing ratio, which proxies fiscal incentives offered to local governments, motivates local governments to compete for capital investment through increased public expenditures. Our results contribute to the fiscal federalism literature by showing that local fiscal incentives significantly shape policy choices and local economic performance. In addition, by exploring fiscal incentives offered to local governments, we offer a novel explanation for the unusually high investment rate in China that has been sustained over a prolonged period of time.
  • Hasan, Iftekhar; Wachtel, Paul; Zhou, Mingming (2006)
    BOFIT Discussion Papers 12/2006
    Published in Journal of Banking & Finance, vol. 33, Issue 1, January 2009, pp. 157-170
    There have been profound changes in both political and economic institutions in China over the last twenty years.Moreover, the pace of transition has led to variation across the country in the level of development.In this paper, we use panel data for the Chinese provinces to study the role of legal institutions, financial deepening and political pluralism on growth rates.The most important institutional developments for a transition economy are the emergence and legalization of the market economy, the establishment of secure property rights, the growth of a private sector, the development of financial sector institutions and markets, and the liberalization of political institutions.We develop measures of these phenomena, which are used as explanatory variables in regression models to explain provincial GDP growth rates.Our evidence suggests that the development of financial markets, legal environment, awareness of property rights and political pluralism are associated with stronger growth. JEL Classifications: O16, P14, P16, O53
  • Soedarmono, Wahyoe; Hasan, Iftekhar; Arsyad, Nuruzzaman (2017)
    International Economics August 2017
    This paper investigates the finance-growth nexus where bank credit is decomposed into investment, consumption, and working capital credit. From a panel dataset of provinces in Indonesia, it documents that higher financial development measured by financial deepening and financial intermediation exhibits an inverted U-shaped relationship with economic growth. This non-linear effect of financial deepening is driven by both investment credit and consumption credit. These results suggest that too much investment credit and, to a lesser extent, consumption credit are detrimental to economic growth. Ultimately, only financial intermediation associated with working capital credit has a positive and monotonic impact on economic growth.
  • Hasan, Iftekhar; Koetter, Michael; Wedow, Michael (2009)
    Bank of Finland Research Discussion Papers 13/2009
    Published in Journal of Banking & Finance, Volume 33, Issue 8, August 2009: 1446-1453
    In this study, we test whether regional growth in 11 European countries depends on financial development and suggest the use of cost- and profit-efficiency estimates as quality measures for financial institutions. Contrary to the usual quantitative proxies for financial development, the quality of financial institutions is measured in this study as the relative ability of banks to intermediate funds. An improvement in bank efficiency spurs five times more regional growth than does an identical increase in credit. More credit provided by efficient banks exerts an independent growth effect in addition to the direct quantity and quality channel effects. Keywords: bank performance, regional growth, bank efficiency, Europe JEL classification numbers: G21, O16, O47, O52
  • Granlund, Peik (2008)
    Bank of Finland Research Discussion Papers 1/2008
    Published in Journal of Banking Regulation, 11, December 2009: 6-30
    In financial market studies, public supervision has rarely been found to have any effects on financial market development. This is true, even though the primary objective of supervisory legislation is the limitation of market failures and externalities. Studies conducted by eg the World Bank and La Porta & al imply that whereas private enforcement contributes to financial market development, there is limited evidence that public supervision does the same. The objective of the paper is to empirically investigate the relation between public supervision and financial market development. This is done by focusing on major legislative features directing the supervisor and hence affecting market participant activities. The markets investigated comprise banks, investment firms, investment fund companies and listed companies in the United States, United Kingdom, Sweden, Finland, Poland and Estonia for the years 1996 to 2005. The results suggest that certain features of public supervision correlate with financial market development. Strong legal obligations for the supervisor to develop legislation correlate significantly with higher company market values. Emphasizing economic aspects in the formulation of supervisory objectives corresponds with higher market profitability. Furthermore, severe monetary sanctions applicable to company directors correlate negatively with market growth. Unexpectedly, the same is true for a high degree of supervisory independence. The results imply links between public supervision and financial market development in a manner not always in line with previous research. Why this is the case, requires further investigation. One possible explanation may be methodological, based on the fact that in the present study legislative features are perceived in a conceptual rather than a technical manner. Keywords: financial institution, regulation, supervision, utility JEL classification numbers: G28, K23, O16