Browsing by Subject "economic outlook"

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  • Bank of Finland (2020)
    Bank of Finland. Bulletin 3/2020
    The Finnish economy is experiencing a sharp contraction on account of the coronavirus pandemic. Gross domestic product will decline by around 7% in 2020. In the next 2 years, the economy will grow around 3% per annum. The forecast contains an exceptionally large degree of uncertainty. The contraction in the economy in 2020 could be only 5% or as much as 11%, depending on how the epidemic progresses in Finland and around the world, and what success there is in bringing it under control. The degree of success in controlling the epidemic will also determine how quickly the economy will recover. It will probably not be possible to avoid permanent losses of output, but economic policy can be used to mitigate their scale.
  • Bank of Finland (2020)
    Bank of Finland. Bulletin 6/2020
    The economic recession caused by the pandemic has so far been milder in Finland than elsewhere in the euro area, but the coming winter will still be difficult. Vaccinations do, however, bring hope of an end to the crisis, both in Finland and around the world. COVID-19 will gradually be left behind in the course of 2021 due to the vaccines, and household consumption will drive growth of 2.2% in the Finnish economy. This will strengthen to 2.5% in 2022. At the end of the forecast period in 2023 the economy will be growing only slowly, as the conditions for growth in the Finnish economy in the long term are weak.
  • Bank of Finland (2020)
    Bank of Finland. Bulletin 3/2020
    The Finnish economy is experiencing a sharp contraction on account of the coronavirus pandemic. Gross domestic product will decline by around 7% this year and grow around 3% per annum in 2021 and 2022. The forecast contains an exceptionally large degree of uncertainty. According to alternative scenarios, the contraction in the economy in the current year could be just 5% or as much as 11%, depending on how the epidemic progresses in Finland and what success there is in bringing it under control. The degree of success in controlling the epidemic will also determine how quickly the economy will recover. It will probably not be possible to avoid permanent losses of output, but economic policy can be used to mitigate their scale.
  • Bank of Finland (2021)
    Bank of Finland. Bulletin 6/2020
    The economic downturn in 2020 will be smaller in Finland than in the rest of the euro area, but this winter will still be difficult. COVID-19 will gradually be left behind in the course of 2021 due to the vaccines, and household consumption will drive growth of 2.2% in the Finnish economy. Growth will strengthen to 2.5% in 2022. At the end of the forecast period in 2023, the economy will return to a slow 1.5% growth rate reflecting the long-term sluggish growth conditions.
  • Bank of Finland (2020)
    Bank of Finland. Bulletin 6/2020
    COVID-19 will gradually be left behind in the course of 2021 due to the vaccines, and private consumption will generate growth of 2.2% in the Finnish economy. This will strengthen to 2.5% in 2022.
  • Kortelainen, Mika; Lindblad, Annika; Obstbaum, Meri; Schmöller, Michaela (2020)
    Bank of Finland. Bulletin 3/2020
    The outlook for the world economy deteriorated in the spring as the coronavirus (COVID-19) developed into a pandemic. Significant re-strictions on movement, business and social interaction have greatly weakened growth potential, while consumption and investment are both being depressed by the uncertainty raised by the virus. Short-term indicators point to a sudden and fairly simultaneous weakening of the Finnish, Swedish and German economies in March. During May, high-frequency indicators showed early signs of picking up, but uncertainty remains high and the recovery will be slow.
  • Ikonen, Pasi; Kerola, Eeva; Vilmi, Lauri (2019)
    Bank of Finland. Bulletin 4/2019
    According to a model-based assessment by the Bank of Finland, tariff increases currently in place will slow global GDP growth by around 0.7 of a percentage point. The trade dispute has already diminished trade flows between the United States and China. The growth of uncertainty has been reflected in investment sentiment, and manufacturing purchasing manager indices have fallen globally. News updates on the current negotiation situation have caused volatility in share prices and securities market risk premia, but significant disruptions on the financial markets have so far been avoided. In an adverse scenario calculated by the Bank of Finland, further escalation of the trade war and subsequent widespread disruptions to the financial markets would slow global GDP growth by a further two percentage points.