Browsing by Subject "economic situation"

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  • Bank of Finland (2018)
    Bank of Finland. Bulletin 3/2018
    Monetary policy remains accommodative, net asset purchases about to end 3 Finland's economy booming 6 Forecast assumptions: International economy and external assumptions 32 Alternative scenario: Clouds over the global economy 36 First quarter of 2018 sees a surge in investments 39 Inflation now explained by different factors than during the recession 42 Unemployment rate in Finland close to structural level 47 Are weakly profitable firms suppressing economic growth? 50 The output gap has closed; Finland's economy at cyclical peak 63 Bank of Finland staff forecasts: an evaluation 72 Finland’s long-term growth prospects moderate 88 Forecast tables for 2018–2020 (june 2018) 101
  • Bank of Finland (2019)
    Bank of Finland. Bulletin 3/2019
    Editorial: Public finances need more room for manoeuvre 3 Slowing growth in the shadow of global uncertainties 7 Improvements in employment held back by population ageing 38 Measures of core inflation filter out temporary price changes 40 Alternative scenario: Raising the employment rate to 75% will require much faster economic growth 43 Most recent statistical data point to faster-than-expected moderation of economic growth 50 What factors influence house prices and residential construction? 54 Forecast tables for 2019–2021 70
  • Bank of Finland (2018)
    Bank of Finland. Bulletin 3/2018
    Finland's economic growth will continue and remain broadly based. Strong global demand, improved cost-competitiveness, growth in household income and favourable financing conditions will all support growth over the forecast period. GDP growth forecasts for 2018–2020 stand at 2.9%, 2.2% and 1.7%. The declining growth rate in the immediate years ahead reflects the moderate long-term outlook for growth. Inflation will remain close to 1% over the years 2018–2019 before gathering pace and reaching 1.5% in 2020.
  • Liikanen, Erkki (2018)
    Bank of Finland. Bulletin 3/2018
    Monetary policy has remained decidedly accommodative in the euro area, all throughout the different phases of the global financial crisis, sovereign debt crisis and the once-looming threat of deflation. To begin with, key interest rates were lowered rapidly. Secondly, the Outright Monetary Transactions (OMT) scheme was implemented to spare the monetary union the risk of break-up, which proved to be highly effective in raising confidence despite the total absence of asset purchases. Thirdly, the public sector purchase programme (PSPP) was initiated.
  • Bank of Finland (2015)
    Bank of Finland. Bulletin 4/2015
    Monetary policy in the euro area has been highly accommodative in recent years. The accommodative stance has also been reflected in banks’ lending rates. The transmission of monetary policy has become more effective, following the strengthening of the euro area banking system and the improvement in banks’ capital adequacy from previous years.
  • Bank of Finland (2015)
    Bank of Finland. Bulletin 1/2015
    The fall in the oil price is broadly reflected across the current situation in the global economy and the outlook for the future. According to most assessments, the oil price drop is for the most part a positive supply shock that in the short term will support growth and slow inflation in net oil-importing countries. In addition to the oil price, long-term interest rates have also declined substantially in the euro area. As a whole, the outlook for the advanced economies has strengthened on average, while the outlook for many emerging economies has weakened. There are, however, major differences within the country groups, a fact also reflected in exchange rates. A particular case in point is the appreciation of the US dollar.
  • Bank of Finland (2017)
    Bank of Finland. Bulletin 3/2017
    The economic upswing in Finland has strengthened, and growth particularly in the first part of 2017 has been strong in the light of the statistical data. Economic growth in recent years has rested exclusively on domestic demand, but the base of growth is now broadening towards exports. The Bank of Finland forecasts GDP growth of 2.1%, 1.7% and 1.4% in 2017, 2018 and 2019, respectively.
  • Bank of Finland (2017)
    Bank of Finland. Bulletin 5/2016
    The Finnish economy has returned to growth. During 2016, growth has strengthened particularly on the back of private consumption and investment recovery. GDP will continue to grow in 2017–2019, driven by domestic demand, but will remain subdued, at a good 1% per annum, relative to previous cyclical upswings. The risks to the baseline forecast are tilted on the downside.
  • Bank of Finland (2015)
    Bank of Finland. Bulletin 5/2015
    The Finnish economy is still in a difficult situation. During the forecast period, the return to growth will be very sluggish and much slower than in the rest of the euro area. Developments in Finland’s export markets now look weaker than previously forecast, and as a result foreign trade will give little stimulus to the economy in the immediate years ahead. During the forecast period, growth will depend on domestic demand. In 2016, the Finnish economy will grow 0.7%, followed by 1.0% in 2017. Risks to the forecast are predominantly on the downside and productivity development will be weak.
  • Bank of Finland (2017)
    Bank of Finland. Bulletin 5/2017
    The global economy is still enjoying strong and broadly based growth. A growth spurt was seen in world trade in 2017, reflecting in part an upward correction from a lacklustre previous year. Consequently, the growth in world trade has accelerated past that of global GDP for the first time in several years. Many economies continue to support growth through accommodative financing conditions and stimulus measures. In the advanced economies, a return to conventional monetary policy has been delayed by persistently low inflation, although this does now appear to be accelerating somewhat.
  • Bank of Finland (2015)
    Bank of Finland. Bulletin 3/2015
  • Bank of Finland (2016)
    Bank of Finland. Bulletin 3/2016
  • Bank of Finland (2017)
    Bank of Finland. Bulletin 3/2017
  • Bank of Finland (2016)
    Bank of Finland. Bulletin 5/2016
  • Bank of Finland (2015)
    Bank of Finland. Bulletin 5/2015
  • Bank of Finland (2017)
    Bank of Finland. Bulletin 5/2017
    See forecast tables for the Finnish economy in 2017–2020 (December 2017).
  • Bank of Finland (2018)
    Bank of Finland. Bulletin 3/2018
    See forecast tables for the Finnish economy in 2018–2020 (June 2018).
  • Bank of Finland (2019)
    Bank of Finland. Bulletin 3/2019
    Forecast tables for the Finnish economy in 2019–2021 (June 2019).
  • Bank of Finland (2019)
    Bank of Finland. Bulletin 5/2019
    See forecast tables for the Finnish economy in 2019–2022 (Dec 2019).
  • Bank of Finland (2020)
    Bank of Finland. Bulletin 3/2020
    The Finnish economy will contract by around 7% this year and grow around 3% per annum over the next 2 years. The forecast contains a large degree of uncertainty – the contraction could be only 5% or as much as 11%, depending on how the pandemic develops. See forecast tables for the Finnish economy in 2020–2022 (June 2020).