Browsing by Subject "indicators"

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  • Bank of Finland (2018)
    Bank of Finland. Bulletin 3/2018
    Monetary policy remains accommodative, net asset purchases about to end 3 Finland's economy booming 6 Forecast assumptions: International economy and external assumptions 32 Alternative scenario: Clouds over the global economy 36 First quarter of 2018 sees a surge in investments 39 Inflation now explained by different factors than during the recession 42 Unemployment rate in Finland close to structural level 47 Are weakly profitable firms suppressing economic growth? 50 The output gap has closed; Finland's economy at cyclical peak 63 Bank of Finland staff forecasts: an evaluation 72 Finland’s long-term growth prospects moderate 88 Forecast tables for 2018–2020 (june 2018) 101
  • Bank of Finland (2019)
    Bank of Finland. Bulletin 3/2019
    Editorial: Public finances need more room for manoeuvre 3 Slowing growth in the shadow of global uncertainties 7 Improvements in employment held back by population ageing 38 Measures of core inflation filter out temporary price changes 40 Alternative scenario: Raising the employment rate to 75% will require much faster economic growth 43 Most recent statistical data point to faster-than-expected moderation of economic growth 50 What factors influence house prices and residential construction? 54 Forecast tables for 2019–2021 70
  • Savolainen, Eero; Vauhkonen, Jukka (2015)
    Bank of Finland. Bulletin 2/2015
    The consequences of a banking crisis could be exceptionally severe in Finland’s concentrated banking system. Regulatory means must therefore be deployed to ensure the capital adequacy and liquidity of Finnish banks remain strong under all circumstances.
  • Tölö, Eero (2015)
    Bank of Finland. Bulletin 2/2015
    In the wake of the international financial crisis, authorities have been given new tools to prevent such crises. These tools – or macroprudential instruments – are intended to enhance banks’ resilience to risk and prevent the excessive lending that often underlies asset price bubbles. In making decisions on deployment of the macroprudential tools, authorities will be supported by a set of early warning indicators confirmed by research data to best predict the outbreak of banking crises.
  • Bank of Finland (2018)
    Bank of Finland. Bulletin 1/2018
    Following the steep contraction caused by the financial crisis, there have been substantial differences in economic performance across the different countries in the euro area. Some countries experienced a double recession from which recovery has been slow. In others, the economy picked up at a steady pace, and in some cases actually rather quickly. The stressed economies in the euro area have also recovered at varying speeds. Healthy economic structures seemed to have facilitated a speedier recovery. At the moment, the four largest euro area economies are growing at a rate above their potential output. Nevertheless, their long-term growth prospects differ from each other.
  • Bank of Finland (2015)
    Bank of Finland. Bulletin 3/2015
  • Bank of Finland (2016)
    Bank of Finland. Bulletin 3/2016
  • Bank of Finland (2017)
    Bank of Finland. Bulletin 3/2017
  • Bank of Finland (2016)
    Bank of Finland. Bulletin 5/2016
  • Bank of Finland (2017)
    Bank of Finland. Bulletin 5/2017
    See forecast tables for the Finnish economy in 2017–2020 (December 2017).
  • Bank of Finland (2018)
    Bank of Finland. Bulletin 3/2018
    See forecast tables for the Finnish economy in 2018–2020 (June 2018).
  • Bank of Finland (2019)
    Bank of Finland. Bulletin 3/2019
    Forecast tables for the Finnish economy in 2019–2021 (June 2019).
  • Bank of Finland (2019)
    Bank of Finland. Bulletin 5/2019
    See forecast tables for the Finnish economy in 2019–2022 (Dec 2019).
  • Bank of Finland (2020)
    Bank of Finland. Bulletin 3/2020
    The Finnish economy will contract by around 7% this year and grow around 3% per annum over the next 2 years. The forecast contains a large degree of uncertainty – the contraction could be only 5% or as much as 11%, depending on how the pandemic develops. See forecast tables for the Finnish economy in 2020–2022 (June 2020).
  • Bank of Finland (2020)
    Bank of Finland. Bulletin 6/2020
    COVID-19 will gradually be left behind in the course of 2021 due to the vaccines, and private consumption will generate growth of 2.2% in the Finnish economy. This will strengthen to 2.5% in 2022.
  • Bank of Finland (2021)
    Bank of Finland. Bulletin 3/2021
    The Finnish economy will grow 2.9% in 2021 and 3.0% in 2022. This fast pace of growth will, however, be only temporary, and in 2023, GDP growth will slow to 1.3%.
  • Bank of Finland (2021)
    Bank of Finland. Bulletin 5/2021
    The Finnish economy will grow 3.5% in 2021 and 2.6% in 2022.
  • Bank of Finland (2018)
    Bank of Finland. Bulletin 5/2018
    Forecast tables for the Finnish economy in 2018–2021 (December 2018).
  • Laine, Tatu (ed.) (2015)
    Bank of Finland. Scientific monographs. E 50
    This simulator seminar book includes twelve chapters dealing with various aspects of quantitative analysis of financial market infrastructures. The topics include, among others, systemic risks, participant behavior, and new monitoring methods of various payment systems. The methodologies vary from payment system simulations to other types of quantitative analysis based e.g. on artificial neural networks as well as GARCH models. These studies have been presented in the Bank of Finland’s simulator seminars during 2012–2014.