Browsing by Subject "taloudelliset katsaukset"

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  • Linnamo, Jussi (1960)
    Bank of Finland. Monthly Bulletin 34 ; 5 ; May
  • Ryti, Risto (1927)
    Bank of Finland. Monthly Bulletin 7 ; 1 ; January
  • Tudeer, A. E. (1937)
    Bank of Finland. Monthly Bulletin 17 ; 1 ; January
  • Tudeer, A. E. (1928)
    Bank of Finland. Monthly Bulletin 8 ; 1 ; January
  • Tudeer, A. E. (1929)
    Bank of Finland. Monthly Bulletin 9 ; 1 ; January
  • Tudeer, A. E. (1930)
    Bank of Finland. Monthly Bulletin 10 ; 1 ; January
  • Tudeer, A. E. (1931)
    Bank of Finland. Monthly Bulletin 11 ; 1 ; January
  • Tudeer, A. E. (1932)
    Bank of Finland. Monthly Bulletin 12 ; 1 ; January
  • Tudeer, A. E. (1933)
    Bank of Finland. Monthly Bulletin 13 ; 1 ; January
  • Tudeer, A. E. (1934)
    Bank of Finland. Monthly Bulletin 14 ; 1 ; January
  • Tudeer, A. E. (1935)
    Bank of Finland. Monthly Bulletin 15 ; 1 ; January
  • Tudeer, A. E. (1936)
    Bank of Finland. Monthly Bulletin 16 ; 1 ; January
  • Tudeer, A. E. (1938)
    Bank of Finland. Monthly Bulletin 18 ; 1 ; January
  • Bank of Finland (2020)
    Bank of Finland. Bulletin 3/2020
    The Finnish economy is experiencing a sharp contraction on account of the coronavirus pandemic. Gross domestic product will decline by around 7% in 2020. In the next 2 years, the economy will grow around 3% per annum. The forecast contains an exceptionally large degree of uncertainty. The contraction in the economy in 2020 could be only 5% or as much as 11%, depending on how the epidemic progresses in Finland and around the world, and what success there is in bringing it under control. The degree of success in controlling the epidemic will also determine how quickly the economy will recover. It will probably not be possible to avoid permanent losses of output, but economic policy can be used to mitigate their scale.
  • Bank of Finland (2020)
    Bank of Finland. Bulletin 5/2019
    Economic growth has slowed in the euro area and in Finland’s other important export markets. As a consequence of the weaker trend in the international economy, Finland’s annual economic growth will slow temporarily in 2020 to under 1%. Both the euro area and the global economy will, however, begin to gradually recover and provide a pull for the Finnish economy, too. Finland’s GDP growth will therefore pick up a little, to 1.1% in 2021 and 1.3% in 2022.
  • Bank of Finland (2020)
    Bank of Finland. Bulletin 6/2020
    The economic recession caused by the pandemic has so far been milder in Finland than elsewhere in the euro area, but the coming winter will still be difficult. Vaccinations do, however, bring hope of an end to the crisis, both in Finland and around the world. COVID-19 will gradually be left behind in the course of 2021 due to the vaccines, and household consumption will drive growth of 2.2% in the Finnish economy. This will strengthen to 2.5% in 2022. At the end of the forecast period in 2023 the economy will be growing only slowly, as the conditions for growth in the Finnish economy in the long term are weak.
  • Bank of Finland (2019)
    Bank of Finland. Bulletin 4/2019
    Global economic growth has slowed substantially in the current year. One cause has been the trade war between the United States and China, which has escalated further since the spring. Now both countries have already imposed additional customs duties on most of their bilateral trade in goods. Meanwhile, Brexit has added further to the uncertainties over the direction of the economy.
  • Singh, Rupinder; Laurila, Juhani (1999)
    BOFIT Discussion Papers 5/1999
    The macro economic stabilisation in Azerbaijan has been successful. Following cessation of conflict with Armenia, and decline of GDP by 60 per cent from 1990 to 1995, the government in effect implemented a big-bang reform process in 1995.The inflation rate has now declined to the lowest rate of any transition country and important reforms in the monetary-fiscal mix have been undertaken.The second plank of first generation reforms, liberalisation, has also been successfully implemented with liberalisation of prices, the trade and foreign exchange regimes and virtual completion of small-scale privatisation, although the onset of the Russian crisis in 1998 has impacted negatively both internal and external balances.The paper presents the current economic picture for Azerbaijan and then assesses economic policy issues facing the country. Azerbaijan is well endowed with natural resources, particularly oil but also gas.The second part of the paper considers the question by focussing on policy issues related to the potential flow of oil-based monies into Azerbaijan.The possibility of the "Dutch Disease" syndrome impacting Azerbaijan through a rising real exchange rate on the non-oil sector is not considered to be a problem at present but is expected to become a policy concern in the medium- to long term.Structural reforms in public finance to deal with expected surpluses are lagging and are necessary in the next phase of the transition of Azerbaijan.Moreover, significant reforms are required in banking - privatisation, improvement in regulation and supervision and in the implementation of supporting legal rights, given the current lack of financial intermediation. Keywords: Azerbaijan, economic development, oil, Dutch Disease, transition economies
  • Lainela, Seija (1994)
    IDÄNTALOUKSIEN KATSAUKSIA. REVIEW OF ECONOMIES IN TRANSITION 4/1994
  • Lainela, Seija (1995)
    IDÄNTALOUKSIEN KATSAUKSIA. REVIEW OF ECONOMIES IN TRANSITION 1/1995