Browsing by Subject "tuonti"

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  • Bank of Finland (2015)
    Bank of Finland. Bulletin 5/2015
    Finland is a small open economy, where fluctuations in exports and imports have shaped the big picture of developments in the economy. A historical review of these developments suggests that the current situation provides no such conditions for rapid export growth supporting the economy as those seen in the earlier growth phases of economic history. Despite facing difficulties, the forest industry is still one of the pillars of Finnish exports alongside the machinery and metal industry.
  • Lindgren, Verner (1927)
    Bank of Finland. Monthly Bulletin 7 ; 7 ; July
  • Solitander, Axel (1932)
    Bank of Finland. Monthly Bulletin 12 ; 12 ; December
  • Cheung, Yin-Wong; Chinn, Menzie D.; Qian, XingWang (2012)
    BOFIT Discussion Papers 14/2012
    Published in Journal of International Money and Finance, Volume 31, Issue 8, 2012, Pages 2127-2146
    We find that Chinese trade flows respond to economic activity and relative prices -- as represented by a trade weighted exchange rate -- but the relationships are not always precisely or robustly estimated. Chinese exports are generally well-behaved, rising with foreign GDP and decreasing as the Chinese renminbi (RMB) appreciates. However, the estimated income elasticity is sensitive to the treatment of time trends. Estimates of aggregate imports are more problematic. In many cases, Chinese aggregate imports actually rise in response to a RMB depreciation and decline with Chinese GDP. This is true even after accounting for the fact a substantial share of imports are subsequently incorporated into Chinese exports. We find that some of these counter-intuitive results are mitigated when we disaggregate the trade flows by customs type, commodity type, and the type of firm undertaking the transactions. However, for imports, we only obtain more reasonable estimates of elasticities when we allow for different import intensities for different components of aggregate demand (specifically, consumption versus investment), or when we include a relative productivity variable. Keywords: China, imports, exports, real exchange rate JEL: F14, F41
  • Rautava, Jouko; Nuutilainen, Riikka; Norring, Anni; Korhonen, Iikka; Kallio, Jyrki (2015)
    BOFIT Policy Brief 11/2015
    Joulukuussa järjestetyn BOFIT Kiina-tietoiskun viisi esitystä käsittelivät Kiinan taloutta ja yhteiskuntaa monesta eri näkökulmasta. Tähän julkaisuun on koottu esitysten keskeinen sisältö artikkeleina. Ensimmäinen artikkeli käsittelee Kiinan talouskehitystä aivan viime aikoina. Toisessa artikkelissa käydään läpi Kiinan taloustilastoinnin ongelmia ja joitakin vaihtoehtoisia talousindikaattoreita. Kolmannen osan aiheena on mm. Kiinan ja Suomen välinen kauppa sekä sijoitukset. Neljännessä artikkelissa käydään läpi Kiinan rahoitusmarkkinoiden ja pääomaliikkeiden vapauttamista. Viides esitys käsittelee Kiinan kommunistisen puolueen roolia sisä- ja ulkopolitiikassa. Hakusanat: Kiina, talouskehitys, bruttokansantuote, vienti, tuonti, pankkijärjestelmä, sisäpolitiikka, ulkopolitiikka. Kaikki esitykset ovat nähtävissä osoitteessa: http://cloud.magneetto.com/suomenpankki/2015_1201_kiina/angular
  • Garcia-Herrero, Alicia; Koivu, Tuuli (2007)
    BOFIT Discussion Papers 6/2007
    Published in Economie Internationale, Volume 116, Issue 4, 2008, Pages 53-92 as China's exchange rate policy and asian trade
    This paper shows empirically that China's trade balance is sensitive to fluctuations in the real effective exchange rate of the renminbi, although the size of the surplus is such that exchange rate policy alone will be unable to address the imbalance. One of the main reasons why the reduction in the trade surplus is limited is that Chinese imports are reduced with a real appreciation of the renminbi.By estimating bilateral import equations, we find that it is imports from other Southeast Asian countries which fall.This result reflects the vertical integration of Southeast Asia with China through the 'Asian production network'.We find, in turn, that imports from Germany - which serve China's domestic demand - behave as one would expect, ie they increase with renminbi real appreciation.All in all, our results raise concerns on the impact of renminbi appreciation on Southeast Asia even if regional currencies do not follow the renminbi's upward trajectory. Keywords: China, trade, exports, real exchange rate JEL classification: F1, F14
  • Simola, Heli (2021)
    BOFIT Policy Brief 10/2021
    With the EU adopting more ambitious emission reduction targets this year, the European Commission in July published a proposal on measures for adjusting EU climate policy. Measures include a carbon border adjustment mechanism (CBAM) that imposes a price on emissions embodied in products imported to the EU. In this policy note, we review the main lines of the CBAM proposal and discuss its potential economic effects on China, India, Russia, Turkey and Ukraine – the EU’s largest import sources for products subject to CBAM. We calculate illustrative estimates for the potential cost effectsof several specifications of the CBAM for these countries and compare them against earlier estimates. We also discuss the potential aggregate economic effects of the CBAM for these economies based on earlier literature. Despite considerable variation across countries and sectors, our analysis suggests that the aggregate economic effects of the CBAM would be limited for most exporting countries.
  • Kaaresvirta, Juuso (2020)
    Bank of Finland Bulletin. Blog
    Tensions between China and the United States have once more been on the rise. The US has heavily criticised China about its handling of the coronavirus pandemic, cyber security violations, and has tightened the screws on Huawei. Trade has also come back into the discussion after the truce made during the winter, when the countries signed the Phase One trade agreement on 15 January and agreed to reduce some of the additional tariffs.
  • Simola, Heli (2021)
    Bank of Finland Bulletin. Blog
    The global economy and global trade flows have been hit hard by the COVID-19 crisis. The trade collapse in the second quarter of 2020 was even more severe than during the trough of the global financial crisis (GFC) in 2009. However, taking into account the substantial fall in the GDP of most countries during the COVID-19 crisis, the relative trade contraction seems milder compared with the GFC. During the GFC, the combined volume of the GDP in OECD countries contracted by about 5%, and the combined volume of imports of goods and services by 17% from peak to trough (Figure 1). The corresponding figures for the COVID-19 crisis were -12% and -20%, respectively. Trade has also recovered rapidly since the trough in the second quarter of 2020. Trade was almost back at pre-crisis level by the end of the year.
  • (1973)
    Bank of Finland. Monthly Bulletin 47 ; 10 ; October
  • Freystätter, Hanna (2012)
    Suomen Pankki. E 43
    Chapter 1: Introduction 9 Chapter 2: Price setting behaviour in an open economy and the determination of Finnish foreign trade prices 29 Chapter 3: Financial market disturbances as sources of business cycle fluctuations in Finland 79 Chapter 4: Financial factors in the boom-bust episode in Finland in the late 1980s and early 1990s 127
  • Bussiére, Matthieu; Peltonen, Tuomas (2008)
    BOFIT Discussion Papers 25/2008
    Published with third author Delle Chiaie, S. in IMF Economic Review, Volume 62, Issue 1, April 2014, Pages 146-178 and ECB WP 2008 ; 951.
    This paper estimates export and import price equations for 41 countries -including 28 emerging market economies. Further, it relates the estimated elasticities to structural fac-tors and tests for statistical breaks in the relation between trade prices and exchange rates. Results indicate that (i) the elasticity of trade prices in emerging markets is sizeable, but not significantly higher than in advanced economies; (ii) such elasticity is primarily influ-enced by macroeconomic factors such as the exchange rate regime and the inflationary en-vironment, although microeconomic factors such as product differentiation also play a role; (iii) export and import price elasticities tend to be strongly correlated across countries; (iv) pass-through to import prices has declined in some advanced economies, noticeably the United States; this is consistent with a rise in pricing-to-market in several EMEs and espe-cially with a change in the geographical composition of U.S. imports. Keywords: emerging market economies, exchange rate pass-through, pricing-to-market, local and producer currency pricing, exchange rate regime. JEL classification: F10, F30, F41.
  • Kuismanen, Mika (1995)
    Suomen Pankin keskustelualoitteita 17/1995
    The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between import prices and exchange rates in Finland.The concept of pass-through is associated with how prices of internationally traded goods are affected by changes in exchange rates. Pass-through is said to be complete when the exporter of the good does not adjust prices in his home currency.This means that exchange rate fluctuations are totally reflected in local import prices abroad.On the contrary, if import prices in local currencies remain stable, it is the prices received by exporters that must adjust to exchange rate movements.This paper presents a simple static theoretical model for pass-through.After that, some estimation results for Finnish import prices are shown.Estimation results are mixed, but it is evident that depreciation of markka increases import prices.
  • Tarkka, Juha; Willman, Alpo (1988)
    Bank of Finland Research Discussion Papers 3/1988
    Specification of the volume and price equation of Finlands multilateral exports of goods is based on the assumption that Finnish products enjoy only temporary monopoly power. In the context of the whole model this implies that the price of exports of goods as well as short-run marginal costs converge towards a level determined solely by competing foreign prices. The modelling of Finlands bilateral trade is based on the assumption that the value of bilateral exports adjusts to the value of bilateral imports, which, in turn, is determined by Finnish demand for imports from eastern markets. Modelling of the trade in services and imports, excluding imports of oil, fuels and lubricants, is quite conventional: the volume of exports of services and the volumes of imports depend on relevant relative price and activity variables. The modelling of imports of crude oil, fuel and lubricants is based on the assumption that imports of energy are a residual determined by the demand for and the domestic supply of energy.
  • (1972)
    Bank of Finland. Monthly Bulletin 46 ; 4 ; April
  • (1924)
    Bank of Finland. Monthly Bulletin 4 ; 11 ; November
  • Pitkäniemi, F. M. (1934)
    Bank of Finland. Monthly Bulletin 14 ; 5 ; May
  • (1925)
    Bank of Finland. Monthly Bulletin 5 ; 2 ; February
  • Lindgren, Verner (1926)
    Bank of Finland. Monthly Bulletin 6 ; 3 ; March
  • Lindgren, Verner (1927)
    Bank of Finland. Monthly Bulletin 7 ; 2 ; February