Tieteelliset erillisjulkaisut - Scientific Monographs (SP) (1995- )

 

Suomen Pankin tieteellisissä erillisjulkaisuissa julkaistaan kokoomateoksia ja muita monografioita. Monografiat ilmestyvät pääasiassa englanniksi ja sisältävät suomenkielisen tiivistelmän.

Uusimmat julkaisut

  • Silvo, Aino (2018)
    Bank of Finland. Scientific monographs. E 52
    This thesis consists of an introductory chapter and three self-contained essays that apply insights from the microeconomic theory of corporate finance in a macroeconomic setting in order to explain and understand various market failures that were at the roots of the global financial crisis of 2007–2009. In particular, I study various forms of incomplete information in the credit market, and their implications on financial stability and on business cycles in the aggregate economy. I also seek to understand how monetary and macroprudential policies can be used to maintain financial stability, and how these two policies interact.
  • Ikonen, Pasi (2017)
    Bank of Finland. Scientific monographs. E 51
    This thesis applies several econometric methods to a selection of country panels to study how growth is influenced by financial development and government debt. The first part presents the thesis discussion, including a synthesis on financial development, government debt, money supply, and economic growth. The second part deepens the discussion with three stand-alone essays. The first essay models how financial development affects growth through utilization of technological innovation. Based on explicit modeling of the innovation channel of finance, the results show a significant and positive sign for the interaction term between the measure of a country’s own innovation and financial development in the most important specifications. This suggests that the innovation channel of finance is likely to be positively relevant to growth. The second essay examines effects of venture capital investment on economic growth in a similar framework. The findings demonstrate that the interaction of venture capital with innovation has a positive and statistically significant coefficient. Further, the joint impact related to venture capital and its interactions is positive in most specifications, suggesting that venture capital is probably a relevant factor for growth. The third essay delves deeply in the effects of general government debt and general government external debt on growth of real GDP. It explores the long-standing endogeneity problem, includes other relevant debt concepts besides government total debt, revisits the issue whether there are threshold values for the government debt ratio, examines the effect of debt on GDP components and structure, uses timely and extensive datasets and extensive robustness analysis, and runs meta-regressions of the results of this and a many of other studies. Even with correction for endogeneity, the study finds modest evidence of a negative and significant growth impact for government debt. The evidence is not robust over all samples and specifications. The final essay also reports evidence of a negative and significant effect of government external debt in the sample of developed economies. The findings overall comport with those of recent papers that conclude that there is no universal threshold value for a government debt ratio that would hold across all countries. Further, government debt appears to decrease the private-investment-to-GDP ratio, but increases the GDP ratio for household consumption. The meta-regression analysis shows that the study’s results on how specification features affect the estimate of the government debt coefficient are broadly in line with those of other studies.
  • Laine, Tatu (ed.) (2015)
    Scientific monographs. E 50
    This simulator seminar book includes twelve chapters dealing with various aspects of quantitative analysis of financial market infrastructures. The topics include, among others, systemic risks, participant behavior, and new monitoring methods of various payment systems. The methodologies vary from payment system simulations to other types of quantitative analysis based e.g. on artificial neural networks as well as GARCH models. These studies have been presented in the Bank of Finland’s simulator seminars during 2012–2014.
  • Itkonen, Juha V.A. (2015)
    Scientific monographs. E 49
    Climate change is one of the greatest market failures of our time. This thesis consists of three essays in which we study the economics of climate change using networks as a theoretical framework. In the first essay, we discover flaws in the foundations of a recent strand of literature estimating the carbon Kuznets curve (CKC). The CKC hypothesizes that carbon dioxide emissions initially increase with economic growth but that the relationship is eventually reversed. The recent literature attempts to estimate the CKC by adding energy consumption as a control variable. Due to model misspecifications related to the econometric methodology and database definitions, the results are biased to support the existence of a CKC. Consequently, the literature underestimates the need for climate policies. In the second essay, we study how social networks might help to explain why differences of opinion about climate change persist across segments of the lay public despite the scientific consensus. To do this, we programmed a Facebook application that collected survey data on concerns about climate change and network data on friendships. We found that respondents tend to have friends with similar concerns as their own, the unconcerned respondents have fewer friends, and any two respondents who disagreed about the seriousness of global warming were less than half as likely to be friends. The results indicate that the structure of the social network may hinder changes in opinions, explaining why opinions persist despite the scientific consensus. The results suggest that the communication of climate science could be improved by strategies that aim to overcome these network effects. In the third essay, we study permit markets which are connected by a network of links. A link allows participants of one emissions trading system to use permits of other systems. In a linked network of markets, foreign regulators can influence domestic policy outcomes even without a direct link. We apply graph theory to study these dependencies between markets to determine who exactly can affect domestic emissions and prices. We characterize the equilibrium’s dependency structure assuming perfect competition and an exogenous trading network. The results help to avoid unexpected foreign interference with domestic policy outcomes and to secure the effectiveness of climate change policies.
  • Herrala, Risto (2012)
    Suomen Pankki. E 48
    Chapter 1 Introduction 11 Chapter 2 Reserve pools 23 Chapter 3 Public intervention and financial crises: an empirical study 43 Chapter 4 Credit conditions and durable consumption: evidence of a strong link 67 Chapter 5 The influence of bank ownership on credit supply: evidence from Russia's recent financial crisis 89 Chapter 6 Conclusions 109