Browsing by Subject "EPIDEMIOLOGY"

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  • Irfan, Furqan B.; Consunji, Rafael; El-Menyar, Ayman; George, Pooja; Peralta, Ruben; Al-Thani, Hassan; Thomas, Stephen Hodges; Alinier, Guillaume; Shuaib, Ashfaq; Al-Suwaidi, Jassim; Singh, Rajvir; Castren, Maaret; Cameron, Peter A.; Djarv, Therese (2017)
    Background: Traumatic cardiac arrest studies have reported improved survival rates recently, ranging from 1.7-7.5%. This population-based nationwide study aims to describe the epidemiology, interventions and outcomes, and determine predictors of survival from out-of-hospital traumatic cardiac arrest (OHTCA) in Qatar. Methods: An observational retrospective population-based study was conducted on OHTCA patients in Qatar, from January 2010 to December 2015. Traumatic cardiac arrest was redefined to include out-of-hospital traumatic cardiac arrest (OHTCA) and in-hospital traumatic cardiac arrest (IHTCA). Results: A total of 410 OHTCA patients were included in the 6-year study period. The mean annual crude incidence rate of OHTCA was 4.0 per 100,000 population, in Qatar. OHTCA mostly occurred in males with a median age of 33. There was a preponderance of blunt injuries (94.3%) and head injuries (66.3%). Overall, the survival rate was 2.4%. Shockable rhythm, prehospital external hemorrhage control, in-hospital blood transfusion, and surgery were associated with higher odds of survival. Adrenaline (Epinephrine) lowered the odds of survival. Conclusion: The incidence of OHTCA was less than expected, with a low rate of survival. Thoracotomy was not associated with improved survival while Adrenaline administration lowered survival in OHTCA patients with majority blunt injuries. Interventions to enable early prehospital control of hemorrhage, blood transfusion, thoracostomy and surgery improved survival. (C) 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
  • Skrifvars, Markus B.; French, Craig; Bailey, Michael; Presneill, Jeffrey; Nichol, Alistair; Little, Lorraine; Durantea, Jacques; Huet, Olivier; Haddad, Samir; Arabi, Yaseen; McArthur, Colin; Cooper, D. James; Bellomo, Rinaldo; EPO-TBI Investigators & ANZICS (2018)
    The EPO-TBI study randomized 606 patients with moderate or severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) to be treated with weekly epoetin alfa (EPO) or placebo. Six month mortality was lower in EPO treated patients in an analysis adjusting for TBI severity. Knowledge of possible differential effects by TBI injury subtype and acute neurosurgical treatment as well as timing and cause of death (COD) will facilitate the design of future interventional TBI trials. We defined COD as cerebral (brain death, cerebral death with withdrawal, or death during maximal care) and non-cerebral (death following withdrawal or during maximal care, which had a non-cerebral cause). The study included 305 patients treated with EPO and 297 treated with placebo, with COD recorded in 77 (99%) out of 78 non-survivors. Median time to death in patients dying of cerebral COD was 8 days (interquartile range [IQR] 5-16) compared with 29 days (IQR 7-56) (p = 0.01) for non-cerebral COD. When assessing subgroups by admission CT scan injury findings, we found no significant differential effects of EPO compared with placebo. However, EPO appeared more effective in patients with an injury type not requiring a neurosurgical operation prior to intensive care unit (ICU) admission (odds ratio [OR] 0.29, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.14-0.61, p = 0.001, p for interaction = 0.003) and in this subgroup, fewer patients died of cerebral causes in the EPO than in the placebo group (5% compared with 14%, p = 0.03). In conclusion, most TBI deaths were from cerebral causes that occurred during the first 2 weeks, and were related to withdrawal of care. EPO appeared to specifically reduce cerebral deaths in the important subgroup of patients with a diffuse type of injury not requiring a neurosurgical intervention prior to randomization.
  • Riihimaki, Matias; Hemminki, Akseli; Sundquist, Kristina; Hemminki, Kari (2014)
  • Rueegg, Corina S.; Stenehjem, Jo S.; Egger, Matthias; Ghiasvand, Reza; Cho, Eunyoung; Lund, Eiliv; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Green, Adele C.; Veierod, Marit B. (2019)
    Whether sunscreen use affects melanoma risk has been widely studied with contradictory results. To answer this question we performed a systematic review of all published studies, accounting for sources of heterogeneity and bias. We searched for original articles investigating the sunscreen-melanoma association in humans to February 28, 2018. We then used random-effects meta-analysis to combine estimates of the association, stratified by study design. Stratified meta-analysis and meta-regression were used to identify sources of heterogeneity. We included 21,069 melanoma cases from 28 studies published 1979-2018: 23 case-control (11 hospital-based, 12 population-based), 1 ecological, 3 cohort and 1 randomised controlled trial (RCT). There was marked heterogeneity across study designs and among case-control studies but adjustment for confounding by sun exposure, sunburns and phenotype systematically moved estimates toward decreased melanoma risk among sunscreen users. Ever- vs. never-use of sunscreen was inversely associated with melanoma in hospital-based case-control studies (adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 0.57, 95%confidence interval (CI) 0.37-0.87, p(heterogeneity) <0.001), the ecological study (rate ratio = 0.48, 95%CI 0.35-0.66), and the RCT (hazard ratio (HR) = 0.49, 95%CI 0.24-1.01). It was not associated in population-based case-control studies (OR = 1.17, 95%CI 0.90-1.51, p(heterogeneity) <0.001) and was positively associated in the cohort studies (HR = 1.27, 95%CI 1.07-1.51, p(heterogeneity) = 0.236). The association differed by latitude (p(interaction) = 0.042), region (p(interaction) = 0.008), adjustment for naevi/freckling (p(interaction) = 0.035), and proportion of never-sunscreen-users (p(interaction) = 0012). Evidence from observational studies on sunscreen use and melanoma risk was weak and heterogeneous, consistent with the challenges of controlling for innate confounding by indication. The only RCT showed a protective effect of sunscreen. What's new? Effectiveness of sunscreen in reducing UV-induced skin damage has been proven in experimental studies, but effectiveness in reducing melanoma in humans remains inconclusive. This is the first meta-analysis to analyze data from four study designs, stratify hospital- and population-based case-control studies, and include as many as five prospective studies. Evidence from observational studies on the sunscreen-melanoma association was heterogeneous, consistent with the challenges of controlling for innate confounding by indication. The only randomized controlled trial showed a protective effect. Public health recommendations should place greater emphasis on the proper use of sunscreen in conjunction with other means of sun protection.
  • Welsh, Paul; Rankin, Naomi; Li, Qiang; Mark, Patrick B.; Würtz, Peter; Ala-Korpela, Mika; Marre, Michel; Poulter, Neil; Hamet, Pavel; Chalmers, John; Woodward, Mark; Sattar, Naveed (2018)
    Aims/hypotheses We aimed to quantify the association of individual circulating amino acids with macrovascular disease, microvascular disease and all-cause mortality in individuals with type 2 diabetes. Methods We performed a case-cohort study (N = 3587), including 655 macrovascular events, 342 microvascular events (new or worsening nephropathy or retinopathy) and 632 all-cause mortality events during follow-up, in a secondary analysis of the Action in Diabetes and Vascular Disease: Preterax and Diamicron Modified Release Controlled Evaluation (ADVANCE) study. For this study, phenylalanine, isoleucine, glutamine, leucine, alanine, tyrosine, histidine and valine were measured in stored plasma samples by proton NMR metabolomics. Hazard ratios were modelled per SD increase in each amino acid. Results In models investigating associations and potential mechanisms, after adjusting for age, sex and randomised treatment, phenylalanine was positively, and histidine inversely, associated with macrovascular disease risk. These associations were attenuated to the null on further adjustment for extended classical risk factors (including eGFR and urinary albumin/creatinine ratio). After adjustment for extended classical risk factors, higher tyrosine and alanine levels were associated with decreased risk of microvascular disease (HR 0.78; 95% CI 0.67, 0.91 and HR 0.86; 95% CI 0.76, 0.98, respectively). Higher leucine (HR 0.79; 95% CI 0.69, 0.90), histidine (HR 0.89; 95% CI 0.81, 0.99) and valine (HR 0.79; 95% CI 0.70, 0.88) levels were associated with lower risk of mortality. Investigating the predictive ability of amino acids, addition of all amino acids to a risk score modestly improved classification of participants for macrovascular (continuous net reclassification index [NRI] +35.5%, p <0.001) and microvascular events (continuous NRI +14.4%, p = 0.012). Conclusions/interpretation We report distinct associations between circulating amino acids and risk of different major complications of diabetes. Low tyrosine appears to be a marker of microvascular risk in individuals with type 2 diabetes independently of fundamental markers of kidney function.
  • Vähämurto, Pauli; Silventoinen, Kaija; Vento, Seija; Karjalainen-Lindsberg, Marja-Liisa; Haapaniemi, Aaro; Back, Leif; Mannisto, Susanna; Leppa, Sirpa; Makitie, Antti A. (2016)
    Sinonasally located lymphoid malignancies are rare lesions with first symptoms similar to other obstructive conditions. Additionally, they often coexist with nasal inflammation and mucosal necrosis. Therefore, time from the first symptoms to diagnosis tends to be long. Awareness and early diagnosis of this disease entity could improve treatment outcome. Altogether, 142 patients with sinonasal or nasopharyngeal (i.e. sinonasal tract, SNT) lymphoid malignancies, diagnosed and treated at the Helsinki University Hospital, during a 39-year period from 1975 to 2013, were retrospectively reviewed. There were 90 males (63 %) and 52 females (37 %) with a median age of 64 years (range 26-92). Eighty-four percent of the patients had primary diseases and 16 % had relapses of lymphoid malignancies primarily diagnosed at other locations. The mean duration of symptoms prior to diagnosis was 4.8 months (range 0.5-24). The most common histological entity was diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (43 %), followed by plasmacytoma (18 %). The most common location was nasopharynx (58 %) followed by nasal cavity (44 %) and paranasal sinuses (35 %). Sixty-nine percent of the lesions were at a single anatomic location of the sinonasal tract. Fifty-two percent of the cases were of Ann Arbor Stage I. Lymphoid malignancies form an important and diverse group in the differential diagnosis of SNT tumours. They most often present with general obstructive nasal symptoms due to tumour location. Most of them are primary lesions, highlighting the importance of an accurate diagnosis as early as possible.
  • Thyssen, Jacob P.; Berents, Teresa; Bradley, Maria; Deleuran, Mette; Grimstad, Oystein; Korhonen, Laura; Langeland, Tor; Sarnhult, Tore; Thomsen, Simon Francis; Thune, Turid; Wahlgren, Carl-Fredrik; Vestergaard, Christian; Von Kobyletzki, Laura B.; Remitz, Anita (2020)
    Similarities and differences in the everyday clinical management of moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis in Nordic countries are unknown. Using a modified Delphi approach, 15 dermatologists from Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden completed face-to-face and online questionnaires and participated in summary discussions to map expert opinion on the clinical management of moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis in these Nordic countries. Through discussions, 6 adult patient profiles, reflecting common disease presentations of atopic dermatitis, were identified. Using these case profiles, diagnostic work-up, treatment goals, patient education and treatment approaches were discussed. Patient education was identified as essential for effective management. A treatment sequence of moderate-to-potent topical glucocorticosteroids and emollients, followed by systemic treatment, was recommended, allowing 3 months to ascertain systemic treatment response before switching, if necessary. Consensus was not reached on systemic treatment choice, reflecting differences in clinical practice and reimbursement between countries. Practical, case-based clinical recommendations were developed for optimal patient care.
  • Ala-Houhala, M.; Koukila-Kahkola, P.; Antikainen, Jenni; Valve, J.; Kirveskari, J.; Anttila, V. -J. (2018)
    Objectives: To assess the clinical use of panfungal PCR for diagnosis of invasive fungal diseases (IFDs). We focused on the deep tissue samples. Methods: We first described the design of panfungal PCR, which is in clinical use at Helsinki University Hospital. Next we retrospectively evaluated the results of 307 fungal PCR tests performed from 2013 to 2015. Samples were taken from normally sterile tissues and fluids. The patient population was nonselected. We classified the likelihood of IFD according to the criteria of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer/Invasive Fungal Infections Cooperative Group and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Mycoses Study Group (EORTC/MSG), comparing the fungal PCR results to the likelihood of IFD along with culture and microscopy results. Results: There were 48 positive (16%) and 259 negative (84%) PCR results. The sensitivity and specificity of PCR for diagnosing IFDs were 60.5% and 91.7%, respectively, while the negative predictive value and positive predictive value were 93.4% and 54.2%, respectively. The concordance between the PCR and the culture results was 86% and 87% between PCR and microscopy, respectively. Of the 48 patients with positive PCR results, 23 had a proven or probable IFD. Conclusions: Fungal PCR can be useful for diagnosing IFDs in deep tissue samples. It is beneficial to combine fungal PCR with culture and microscopy. M. Ala-Houhala, Clin Microbiol Infect 2018;24:301 (C) 2017 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • Vitikainen, Krista; Haapamaki, Johanna; Farkkila, Martti; Anttila, Veli-Jukka; Arkkila, Perttu (2018)
    Objective: Characterization of predisposing factors for Clostridium difficile infection recurrence (rCDI) and outcome in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients.Methods: Clinical characteristics of 167 inflammatory bowel disease patients with Clostridium difficile infection (IBD-CDI cohort) treated in Helsinki University Central Hospital were gathered. Medical history of the last three months preceding a toxin positive CDI test was recorded. Parameters, including ribotype of C. difficile, mortality and recurrence were compared with age and gender-matched C. difficile patients (CDI cohort).Results: No difference was found in rCDI between IBD-CDI and CDI cohorts. As compared with IBD subtypes, rCDI was least common among patients with Crohn's disease. The use of immunosuppressant therapy was higher in IBD patients with two or more CDI episodes. C. difficile ribotype 027 increased the rates for rCDI in IBD patients but not in non-IBD-CDI patients. The prevalence of 027 ribotype and mortality rates did not differ significantly among the cohorts. None of the IBD patients underwent colectomy upon CDI.Conclusion: IBD patients are not more susceptible for rCDI than non-IBD patients. Predisposing factors for rCDI among IBD patients are associated with immunosuppressant treatments, colon affecting IBD and CDI caused by ribotype 027. CDI does not worsen the prognosis of IBD patients.
  • Felix, Janine F.; Joubert, Bonnie R.; Baccarelli, Andrea A.; Sharp, Gemma C.; Almqvist, Catarina; Annesi-Maesano, Isabella; Arshad, Hasan; Baiz, Nour; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J.; Bakulski, Kelly M.; Binder, Elisabeth B.; Bouchard, Luigi; Breton, Carrie V.; Brunekreef, Bert; Brunst, Kelly J.; Burchard, Esteban G.; Bustamante, Mariona; Chatzi, Leda; Munthe-Kaas, Monica Cheng; Corpeleijn, Eva; Czamara, Darina; Dabelea, Dana; Smith, George Davey; De Boever, Patrick; Duijts, Liesbeth; Dwyer, Terence; Eng, Celeste; Eskenazi, Brenda; Everson, Todd M.; Falahi, Fahimeh; Fallin, M. Daniele; Farchi, Sara; Fernandez, Mariana F.; Gao, Lu; Gaunt, Tom R.; Ghantous, Akram; Gillman, Matthew W.; Gonseth, Semira; Grote, Veit; Gruzieva, Olena; Haberg, Siri E.; Herceg, Zdenko; Hivert, Marie-France; Holland, Nina; Holloway, John W.; Hoyo, Cathrine; Hu, Donglei; Huang, Rae-Chi; Huen, Karen; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jima, Dereje D.; Just, Allan C.; Karagas, Margaret R.; Karlsson, Robert; Karmaus, Wilfried; Kechris, Katerina J.; Kere, Juha; Kogevinas, Manolis; Koletzko, Berthold; Koppelman, Gerard H.; Kupers, Leanne K.; Ladd-Acosta, Christine; Lahti, Jari; Lambrechts, Nathalie; Langie, Sabine A. S.; Lie, Rolv T.; Liu, Andrew H.; Magnus, Maria C.; Magnus, Per; Maguire, Rachel L.; Marsit, Carmen J.; McArdle, Wendy; Melen, Erik; Melton, Phillip; Murphy, Susan K.; Nawrot, Tim S.; Nistico, Lorenza; Nohr, Ellen A.; Nordlund, Bjorn; Nystad, Wenche; Oh, Sam S.; Oken, Emily; Page, Christian M.; Perron, Patrice; Pershagen, Goran; Pizzi, Costanza; Plusquin, Michelle; Räikkönen, Katri; Reese, Sarah E.; Reischl, Eva; Richiardi, Lorenzo; Ring, Susan; Roy, Ritu P.; Rzehak, Peter; Schoeters, Greet; Schwartz, David A.; Sebert, Sylvain; Snieder, Harold; Sorensen, Thorkild I. A.; Starling, Anne P.; Sunyer, Jordi; ATaylor, Jack; Tiemeier, Henning; Ullemar, Vilhelmina; Vafeiadi, Marina; Van Ijzendoorn, Marinus H.; Vonk, Judith M.; Vriens, Annette; Vrijheid, Martine; Wang, Pei; Wiemels, Joseph L.; Wilcox, Allen J.; Wright, Rosalind J.; Xu, Cheng-Jian; Xu, Zongli; Yang, Ivana V.; Yousefi, Paul; Zhang, Hongmei; Zhang, Weiming; Zhao, Shanshan; Agha, Golareh; Relton, Caroline L.; Jaddoe, Vincent W. V.; London, Stephanie J. (2018)
  • Kanerva, M.; Skogberg, K.; Ryynanen, K.; Pahkamaki, A.; Jalava, J.; Ollgren, J.; Tarkka, E.; Lyytikainen, O. (2015)
    In Finland, occurrence of Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase-producing K. pneumoniae (KPC-KP) has previously been sporadic and related to travel. We describe the first outbreak of colonisation with KPC-KP strain ST512; it affected nine patients in a 137-bed primary care hospital. The index case was detected by chance when a non-prescribed urine culture was taken from an asymptomatic patient with suprapubic urinary catheter in June 2013. Thereafter, all patients on the 38-bed ward were screened until two screening rounds were negative and extensive control measures were performed. Eight additional KPC-KP-carriers were found, and the highest prevalence of carriers on the ward was nine of 38. All other patients hospitalised on the outbreak ward between 1 May and 10 June and 101 former roommates of KPC-KP carriers since January had negative screening results. Two screening rounds on the hospital's other wards were negative. No link to travel abroad was detected. Compared with non-carriers, but without statistical significance, KPC-KP carriers were older (83 vs 76 years) and had more often received antimicrobial treatment within the three months before screening (9/9 vs 90/133). No clinical infections occurred during the six-month follow-up. Early detection, prompt control measures and repetitive screening were crucial in controlling the outbreak.
  • Mistegard, Josephine; Gudbjornsson, Bjorn; Lindqvist, Ulla; Laasonen, Leena; Ejstrup, Leif; Ståhle, Mona; Iversen, Lars (2021)
    Objective: Psoriatic arthritis mutilans (PAM) is the most severe phenotype of psoriatic arthritis due to excessive bone erosion causing joint destruction and decreased functional capacity. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of comorbidities among patients with PAM and the association between comorbidities and joint involvement. Methods: A total of 66 patients aged >= 18 years from the Nordic countries with past or present psoriasis along with at least one mutilated joint were included in the present study. Results: The median number of comorbid conditions per patient was 1 [interquartile range (IQR) 0-2] and 16.7% reported three or more comorbidities. The most frequent comorbidity was hypertension (36.4%). The median number of mutilated joints per patient was 3 (IQR 1-8.3; range 1-38). Conclusion: Two thirds of the patients with PAM reported comorbid conditions and the most frequent was hypertension which affected more than a third of the patients. However, this study was unable to detect any association between comorbidities and the severity of PAM.
  • Leppävirta, Jussi; Kallionpaa, Roope A.; Uusitalo, Elina; Vahlberg, Tero; Pöyhönen, Minna; Peltonen, Juha; Peltonen, Sirkku (2018)
    Background: Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is a dominantly inherited Rasopathy caused by mutations in the NF1 gene on chromosome 17. NF1 has been connected to congenital anomalies, e.g., in the skeletal and cardiovascular systems, but the overall incidence of anomalies is unknown. In this retrospective register-based total population study conducted in Finland, the congenital anomalies in NF1 were evaluated. Methods: One thousand four hundred ten patients with NF1 were identified by searching the medical records related to inpatient and outpatient hospital visits of patients with an associated diagnosis for NF1 in 1987-2011. Each diagnosis was confirmed by a thorough review of the medical records. Ten non-NF1 control persons per NF1 patient were collected from the Population Register Centre. NF1 patients and controls were linked to the Medical Birth Register and the Register of Congenital Malformations. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) for major congenital anomalies (MCA) were calculated. Results: The OR for at least one MCA among NF1 children was almost threefold (adjusted OR 2.78, 95% CI 1.71-4.54) compared to controls matched for age, sex and municipality. NF1 children had a significantly increased risk of congenital anomalies in the circulatory (adjusted OR 3.35, 95% CI 1.64-6.83), urinary (adjusted OR 4.26, 95% CI 1.36-13.35) and musculoskeletal (adjusted OR 2.77, 95% CI 1.09-7.02) systems. Also, anomalies of the eye, ear, head and neck were more common among NF1 children than controls (adjusted OR 4.66, 95% CI 1.42-15.31). Non-NF1 children of mothers with NF1 did not have more anomalies than controls (adjusted OR 0.53, 95% CI 0.13-2.21). Conclusions: Children with NF1 have more MCAs than controls and close follow-up during pregnancy and the neonatal period is required if the mother or father has NF1. Non-NF1 children of mothers with NF1 do not have an increased risk for anomalies.
  • Nikinmaa, Sakari; Podonyi, Anna; Raivio, Peter; Meurman, Jukka; Sorsa, Timo; Rantala, Juha; Kankuri, Esko; Tauriainen, Tuomas; Pätilä, Tommi (2021)
    New means to reduce excessive antibiotic use are urgently needed. This study tested dual-light aPDT against Staphylococcus aureus biofilm with different relative ratios of light energy with indocyanine green. We applied single-light aPDT (810 nm aPDT, 405 aBL) or dual-light aPDT (simultaneous 810 nm aPDT and 405 nm aBL), in both cases, together with the ICG photosensitizer with constant energy of 100 or 200 J/cm(2). Single-dose light exposures were given after one-day, three-day, or six-day biofilm incubations. A repeated daily dose of identical light energy was applied during biofilm incubations for the three- and six-day biofilms. Using 100 J/cm(2) light energy against the one-day biofilm, the dual-light aPDT consisting of more than half of aBL was the most effective. On a three-day maturated biofilm, single-dose exposure to aPDT or dual-light aPDT was more effective than aBL alone. With total light energy of 200 J/cm(2), all dual-light treatments were effective. Dual-light aPDT improves the bactericidal effect on Staphylococcus aureus biofilm compared to aPDT or aBL and provides a sustained effect. An increase in the relative ratio of aBL strengthens the antibacterial effect, mainly when the treatment is repeatedly applied. Thus, the light components' energy ratio is essential with dual-light.
  • Mendelian Randomization Dairy Cons; Huang, Tao; Kähönen, Mika; Mikkilä, Vera; Viikari, Jorma; Raitakari, Olli; Lehtimäki, Terho (2018)
    BACKGROUND: Associations between dairy intake and body mass index (BMI) have been inconsistently observed in epidemiological studies, and the causal relationship remains ill defined. METHODS: We performed Mendelian randomization (MR) analysis using an established dairy intake-associated genetic polymorphism located upstream of the lactase gene (LCT-13910 C/T, rs4988235) as an instrumental variable (IV). Linear regression models were fitted to analyze associations between (a) dairy intake and BMI, (b) rs4988235 and dairy intake, and (c) rs4988235 and BMI in each study. The causal effect of dairy intake on BMI was quantified by IV estimators among 184802 participants from 25 studies. RESULTS: Higher dairy intake was associated with higher BMI (beta = 0.03 kg/m(2) per serving/day; 95% CI, 0.00-0.06; P = 0.04), whereas the LCT genotype with 1 or 2 T allele was significantly associated with 0.20 (95% CI, 0.14-0.25) serving/day higher dairy intake (P = 3.15 x 10(-12)) and 0.12 (95% CI, 0.06-0.17) kg/m(2) higher BMI (P = 2.11 x 10(-5)). MR analysis showed that the genetically determined higher dairy intake was significantly associated with higher BMI (beta = 0.60 kg/m(2) per serving/day; 95% CI, 0.27-0.92; P = 3.0 x 10(-4)). CONCLUSIONS: The present study provides strong evidence to support a causal effect of higher dairy intake on increased BMI among adults. (c) 2017 American Association for Clinical Chemistry
  • Kantele, Anu; Lääveri, Tinja; Mero, Sointu; Häkkinen, Inka M. K.; Kirveskari, Juha; Johnston, Brian D.; Johnson, James R. (2020)
    Background. One-third of the 100 million travelers to the tropics annually acquire extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-PE), with undefined clinical consequences. Methods. Symptoms suggesting Enterobacteriaceae infections were recorded prospectively among 430 Finnish travelers, 90 (21%) of whom acquired ESBL-PE abroad. ESBL-PE isolates underwent polymerase chain reaction-based detection of diarrheagenic Escherichia coli (DEC) pathotypes (enteroaggregative E. coli [EAEC], enteropathogenic E. coli [EPEC], enterotoxigenic E. coli [ETEC], enteroinvasive E. coli, and Shiga toxin-producing E. coli), and extraintestinal pathogenic/uropathogenic E. coli (ExPEC/UPEC). Laboratory-confirmed ESBL-PE infections were surveyed 5 years before and after travel. Results. Among the 90 ESBL-PE carriers, manifestations of Enterobacteriaceae infection included travelers' diarrhea (TD) (75/90 subjects) and urinary tract infection (UTI) (3/90). The carriers had 96 ESBL-producing E. coli isolates, 51% exhibiting a molecular pathotype: 13 (14%) were DEC (10 EAEC, 2 EPEC, 1 ETEC) (12 associated with TD) and 39 (41%) ExPEC/UPEC (none associated with UTI). Of ESBL-PE, 3 (3%) were ExPEC/UPEC-EAEC hybrids (2 associated with diarrhea, none with UTI). Potential ESBL-PE infections were detected in 15 of 90 subjects (17%). The 10-year medical record survey identified 4 laboratory-confirmed ESBL-PE infections among the 430 travelers, all in subjects who screened ESBL-PE negative after returning home from their index journeys but had traveled abroad before their infection episodes. Conclusions. Half of all travel-acquired ESBL-producing E. coli strains qualified molecularly as pathogens. Extraintestinal and uropathogenic pathotypes outnumbered enteric pathotypes (41% vs 14%), yet the latter correlated more closely with symptomatic infection (0% vs 92%). Despite more ESBL-PE strains qualifying as ExPEC/UPEC than DEC, travel-acquired ESBL-PE are more often associated with TD than UTI.
  • Räsänen, Joel; Huovinen, Joel; Korhonen, Ville E.; Junkkari, Antti; Kastinen, Sami; Komulainen, Simo; Oinas, Minna; Avellan, Cecilia; Frantzen, Janek; Rinne, Jaakko; Ronkainen, Antti; Kauppinen, Mikko; Lönnrot, Kimmo; Perola, Markus; Koivisto, Anne M.; Remes, Anne M.; Soininen, Hilkka; Hiltunen, Mikko; Helisalmi, Seppo; Kurki, Mitja I.; Jääskeläinen, Juha E.; Leinonen, Ville (2020)
    Background The pathophysiological basis of idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH) is still unclear. Previous studies have shown a familial aggregation and a potential heritability when it comes to iNPH. Our aim was to conduct a novel case-controlled comparison between familial iNPH (fNPH) patients and their elderly relatives, involving multiple different families. Methods Questionnaires and phone interviews were used for collecting the data and categorising the iNPH patients into the familial (fNPH) and the sporadic groups. Identical questionnaires were sent to the relatives of the potential fNPH patients. Venous blood samples were collected for genetic studies. The disease histories of the probable fNPH patients (n = 60) were compared with their >= 60-year-old relatives with no iNPH (n = 49). A modified Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI) was used to measure the overall disease burden. Fisher's exact test (two-tailed), the Mann-Whitney U test (two-tailed) and a multivariate binary logistic regression analysis were used to perform the statistical analyses. Results Diabetes (32% vs. 14%, p = 0.043), arterial hypertension (65.0% vs. 43%, p = 0.033), cardiac insufficiency (16% vs. 2%, p = 0.020) and depressive symptoms (32% vs. 8%, p = 0.004) were overrepresented among the probable fNPH patients compared to their non-iNPH relatives. In the age-adjusted multivariate logistic regression analysis, diabetes remained independently associated with fNPH (OR = 3.8, 95% CI 1.1-12.9, p = 0.030). Conclusions Diabetes is associated with fNPH and a possible risk factor for fNPH. Diabetes could contribute to the pathogenesis of iNPH/fNPH, which motivates to further prospective and gene-environmental studies to decipher the disease modelling of iNPH/fNPH.
  • Garcia-Larsen, Vanessa; Del Giacco, Stefano R.; Moreira, Andre; Bonini, Matteo; Haahtela, Tari; Bonini, Sergio; Carlsen, Kai-Hakon; Agache, Ioana; Fonseca, Joao; Papadopoulos, Nikolaos G.; Delgado, Luis (2016)
    Background: Diet has been proposed to modulate the risk of asthma in children and adults. An increasing body of epidemiological studies have been published in the last year investigating the association between dietary intake and asthma. As part of the Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guideline Task Force on 'Lifestyle Interventions in Allergy and Asthma' funded by the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, we will use a systematic approach to review the evidence from published scientific literature on dietary intake and asthma in children and adults. Methods: This systematic review will be carried out following the PRISMA guidelines. The protocol has been published in PROSPERO (CRD42016036078). We will review the evidence from epidemiological studies in children (from the age of 2 years) and adults and dietary intake of foods and nutrients. Discussion: The findings from this review will be used as a reference to inform guideline recommendations.
  • Zamora-Ros, Raul; Cayssials, Valerie; Jenab, Mazda; Rothwell, Joseph A.; Fedirko, Veronika; Aleksandrova, Krasimira; Tjonneland, Anne; Kyro, Cecilie; Overvad, Kim; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Carbonnel, Franck; Mahamat-Saleh, Yahya; Kaaks, Rudolf; Kuehn, Tilman; Boeing, Heiner; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Valanou, Elissavet; Vasilopoulou, Effie; Masala, Giovanna; Pala, Valeria; Panico, Salvatore; Tumino, Rosario; Ricceri, Fulvio; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Lukic, Marko; Sandanger, Torkjel M.; Lasheras, Cristina; Agudo, Antonio; Sanchez, Maria-Jose; Amiano, Pilar; Navarro, Carmen; Ardanaz, Eva; Sonestedt, Emily; Ohlsson, Bodil; Nilsson, Lena Maria; Rutegard, Martin; Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas; Peeters, Petra H.; Khaw, Kay-Thee; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Bradbury, Kathryn; Freisling, Heinz; Romieu, Isabelle; Cross, Amanda J.; Vineis, Paolo; Scalbert, Augustin (2018)
    Polyphenols may play a chemopreventive role in colorectal cancer (CRC); however, epidemiological evidence supporting a role for intake of individual polyphenol classes, other than flavonoids is insufficient. We evaluated the association between dietary intakes of total and individual classes and subclasses of polyphenols and CRC risk and its main subsites, colon and rectum, within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study. The cohort included 476,160 men and women from 10 European countries. During a mean follow-up of 14years, there were 5991 incident CRC cases, of which 3897 were in the colon and 2094 were in the rectum. Polyphenol intake was estimated using validated centre/country specific dietary questionnaires and the Phenol-Explorer database. In multivariable-adjusted Cox regression models, a doubling in total dietary polyphenol intake was not associated with CRC risk in women (HRlog2=1.06, 95% CI 0.99-1.14) or in men (HRlog2=0.97, 95% CI 0.90-1.05), respectively. Phenolic acid intake, highly correlated with coffee consumption, was inversely associated with colon cancer in men (HRlog2=0.91, 95% CI 0.85-0.97) and positively associated with rectal cancer in women (HRlog2=1.10, 95% CI 1.02-1.19); although associations did not exceed the Bonferroni threshold for significance. Intake of other polyphenol classes was not related to colorectal, colon or rectal cancer risks. Our study suggests a possible inverse association between phenolic acid intake and colon cancer risk in men and positive with rectal cancer risk in women.
  • Wiersema, Renske; Jukarainen, Sakari; Eck, Ruben J.; Kaufmann, Thomas; Koeze, Jacqueline; Keus, Frederik; Pettilä, Ville; van der Horst, Iwan C. C.; Vaara, Suvi T. (2020)
    Background Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a frequent and clinically relevant problem in critically ill patients. Various randomized controlled trials (RCT) have attempted to assess potentially beneficial treatments for AKI. Different approaches to applying the Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) criteria for AKI make a comparison of studies difficult. The objective of this study was to assess how different approaches may impact estimates of AKI incidence and whether the association between AKI and 90-day mortality varied by the approach used. Methods Consecutive acutely admitted adult intensive care patients were included in a prospective observational study. AKI was determined following the KDIGO criteria during the first 7 days of ICU admission. In this post hoc analysis, we assessed whether AKI incidence differed when applying the KDIGO criteria in 30 different possible methods, varying in (A) serum creatinine (sCr), (B) urine output (UO), and (C) the method of combining these two into an outcome, e.g., severe AKI. We assessed point estimates and 95% confidence intervals for each incidence. Univariable regression was used to assess the associations between AKI and 90-day mortality. Results A total of 1010 patients were included. Baseline creatinine was available in 449 (44%) patients. The incidence of any AKI ranged from 28% (95%CI 25-31%) to 75% (95%CI 72-77%) depending on the approach used. Methods to estimate missing baseline sCr caused a variation in AKI incidence up to 15%. Different methods of handling UO caused a variation of up to 35%. At 90 days, 263 patients (26%) had died, and all 30 variations were associated with 90-day mortality. Conclusions In this cohort of critically ill patients, AKI incidence varied from 28 to 75%, depending on the method used of applying the KDIGO criteria. A tighter adherence to KDIGO definitions is warranted to decrease the heterogeneity of AKI and increase the comparability of future studies.