Browsing by Subject "PROTEINS"

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  • Hytönen, Marjo K.; Arumilli, Meharji; Sarkiala, Eva; Nieminen, Pekka; Lohi, Hannes (2019)
    Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) refers to a genetically and clinically heterogeneous group of inherited disorders affecting the structure, composition, and quantity of tooth enamel. Both non-syndromic and syndromic forms of AI have been described and several genes affecting various aspects of the enamel physiology have been reported. Genetically modified murine models of various genes have provided insights into the complex regulation of proper amelogenesis. Non-syndromic AI occurs spontaneously also in dogs with known recessive variants in ENAM and SLC24A4 genes. Unlike rodents with a reduced dentition and continuously erupting incisors, canine models are valuable for human AI due to similarity in the dental anatomy including deciduous and permanent teeth. We have performed a series of clinical and genetic analyses to investigate AI in several breeds of dogs and describe here two novel recessive variants in the ENAM and ACP4 genes. A fully segregating missense variant (c.716C>T) in exon 8 of ENAM substitutes a well-conserved proline to leucine, p.(Pro239Leu), resulting in a clinical hypomineralization of teeth. A 1-bp insertion in ACP4 (c.1189dupG) is predicted to lead to a frameshift, p.(Ala397Glyfs), resulting in an abnormal C-terminal part of the protein, and hypoplastic AI. The ENAM variant was specific for Parson Russell Terriers with a carrier frequency of 9%. The ACP4 variant was found in two breeds, Akita and American Akita with a carrier frequency of 22%. These genetic findings establish novel canine models of human AI with a particular interest in the case of the ACP4-deficient model, since ACP4 physiology is poorly characterized in human AI. The affected dogs could also serve as preclinical models for novel treatments while the breeds would benefit from genetic tests devised here for veterinary diagnostics and breeding programs.
  • Lietzen, Niina; Cheng, Lu; Moulder, Robert; Siljander, Heli; Laajala, Essi; Härkönen, Taina; Peet, Aleksandr; Vehtari, Aki; Tillmann, Vallo; Knip, Mikael; Lahdesmaki, Harri; Lahesmaa, Riitta (2018)
    Children develop rapidly during the first years of life, and understanding the sources and associated levels of variation in the serum proteome is important when using serum proteins as markers for childhood diseases. The aim of this study was to establish a reference model for the evolution of a healthy serum proteome during early childhood. Label-free quantitative proteomics analyses were performed for 103 longitudinal serum samples collected from 15 children at birth and between the ages of 3-36 months. A flexible Gaussian process-based probabilistic modelling framework was developed to evaluate the effects of different variables, including age, living environment and individual variation, on the longitudinal expression profiles of 266 reliably identified and quantified serum proteins. Age was the most dominant factor influencing approximately half of the studied proteins, and the most prominent age-associated changes were observed already during the first year of life. High inter-individual variability was also observed for multiple proteins. These data provide important details on the maturing serum proteome during early life, and evaluate how patterns detected in cord blood are conserved in the first years of life. Additionally, our novel modelling approach provides a statistical framework to detect associations between covariates and non-linear time series data.
  • Rabsztyn, K.; Kasperkiewicz, K.; Duda, K. A.; Li, C-M.; Lukasik, M.; Radziejewska-Lebrecht, J.; Skurnik, M. (2011)
  • Kallijärvi, Jukka; Stratoulias, Vassilis; Virtanen, Kristel; Hietakangas, Ville; Heino, Tapio I.; Saarma, Mart (2012)
  • Magarkar, Aniket; Dhawan, Vivek; Kallinteri, Paraskevi; Viitala, Tapani; Elmowafy, Mohammed; Rog, Tomasz; Bunker, Alex (2014)
  • Hedenbjork-Lager, Anders; Hamberg, Kristina; Paakkonen, Virve; Tjaderhane, Leo; Ericson, Dan (2016)
    Objective: Dental caries is a process driven by acids produced by oral microorganisms followed by degradation of the dentine collagen matrix by proteolytic enzymes. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) have been suggested to contribute to caries by degrading collagen. The aim of this study was to develop a method for generating demineralized dentine matrix substrate (DDM) maintaining MMP-8 bioactivity and no interference with later assays. Such a substrate would allow study of the effects of various treatments on MMP-8 activity and collagen degradation in demineralized dentine. Design: Human dentine was powderized in a tissue grinder and frozen (-80 degrees C). The powder was demineralized in dialysis tubes, using EDTA or acetic acid. The demineralized dentine matrix (DDM) was harvested and analyzed for collagen content using SDS-PAGE. The DDM was subsequently suspended in PBS or TESCA buffer. Protein, MMP-8 (ELISA) and collagen (HYP) was analyzed directly or after 1 wk. Results: EDTA or acid demineralization of dentine using dialysis yielded a substrate rich in collagen coupled with preserved MMP-8 activity. Collagen degraded in room temperature, assessed by higher HYP amounts in the soluble fraction of DDM after one wk, indicating that the methods used preserved active DDM-components after the demineralization process. Conclusions: The presented demineralization methods both provided insoluble DDM substrates suitable for further intervention studies. However, it was found that the substrates differed depending on the demineralization method and buffers used. This needs further study to find an optimal technique for generating DDM with retained proteins as well as enzymatic bioactivity. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • Multamäki, Elina; Nanekar, Rahul; Morozov, Dmitry; Lievonen, Topias; Golonka, David; Wahlgren, Weixiao Yuan; Stucki-Buchli, Brigitte; Rossi, Jari; Hytönen, Vesa P.; Westenhoff, Sebastian; Ihalainen, Janne A.; Möglich, Andreas; Takala, Heikki (2021)
    Bacterial phytochrome photoreceptors usually belong to two-component signaling systems which transmit environmental stimuli to a response regulator through a histidine kinase domain. Phytochromes switch between red light-absorbing and far-red light-absorbing states. Despite exhibiting extensive structural responses during this transition, the model bacteriophytochrome from Deinococcus radiodurans (DrBphP) lacks detectable kinase activity. Here, we resolve this long-standing conundrum by comparatively analyzing the interactions and output activities of DrBphP and a bacteriophytochrome from Agrobacterium fabrum (Agp1). Whereas Agp1 acts as a conventional histidine kinase, we identify DrBphP as a light-sensitive phosphatase. While Agp1 binds its cognate response regulator only transiently, DrBphP does so strongly, which is rationalized at the structural level. Our data pinpoint two key residues affecting the balance between kinase and phosphatase activities, which immediately bears on photoreception and two-component signaling. The opposing output activities in two highly similar bacteriophytochromes suggest the use of light-controllable histidine kinases and phosphatases for optogenetics. The bacteriophytochrome DrBphP from Deinococcus radiodurans shows high sequence homology to the histidine kinase Agp1 from Agrobacterium fabrum but lacks kinase activity. Here, the authors structurally and biochemically analyse DrBphP and Agp1, showing that DrBphP is a light-activatable phosphatase.
  • Saraswat, Mayank; Joenvaara, Sakari; Seppanen, Hanna; Mustonen, Harri; Haglund, Caj; Renkonen, Risto (2017)
    Finland ranks sixth among the countries having highest incidence rate of pancreatic cancer with mortality roughly equaling incidence. The average age of diagnosis for pancreatic cancer is 69years in Nordic males, whereas the average age of diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis is 40-50years, however, many cases overlap in age. By radiology, the evaluation of a pancreatic mass, that is, the differential diagnosis between chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer is often difficult. Preoperative needle biopsies are difficult to obtain and are demanding to interpret. New blood based biomarkers are needed. The accuracy of the only established biomarker for pancreatic cancer, CA 19-9 is rather poor in differentiating between benign and malignant mass of the pancreas. In this study, we have performed mass spectrometry analysis (High Definition MSE) of serum samples from patients with chronic pancreatitis (13) and pancreatic cancer (22). We have quantified 291 proteins and performed detailed statistical analysis such as principal component analysis, orthogonal partial least square discriminant analysis and receiver operating curve analysis. The proteomic signature of chronic pancreatitis versus pancreatic cancer samples was able to separate the two groups by multiple statistical techniques. Some of the enriched pathways in the proteomic dataset were LXR/RXR activation, complement and coagulation systems and inflammatory response. We propose that multiple high-confidence biomarker candidates in our pilot study including Inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor heavy chain H2 (Area under the curve, AUC: 0.947), protein AMBP (AUC: 0.951) and prothrombin (AUC: 0.917), which should be further evaluated in larger patient series as potential new biomarkers for differential diagnosis.
  • Ye, Lingling; Wang, Xin; Lyu, Munan; Siligato, Riccardo; Eswaran, Gugan; Vainio, Leo; Blomster, Tiina; Zhang, Jing; Mähönen, Ari Pekka (2021)
    During primary growth, plant tissues increase their length, and as these tissues mature, they initiate secondary growth to increase thickness.(1) It is not known what activates this transition to secondary growth. Cytokinins are key plant hormones regulating vascular development during both primary and secondary growth. During primary growth of Arabidopsis roots, cytokinins promote procambial cell proliferation(2,3) and vascular patterning together with the hormone auxin.(4-7) In the absence of cytokinins, secondary growth fails to initiate.(8) Enhanced cytokinin levels, in turn, promote secondary growth.(8,9) Despite the importance of cytokinins, little is known about the downstream signaling events in this process. Here, we show that cytokinins and a few downstream LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES DOMAIN (LBD) family of transcription factors are rate limiting components in activating and further promoting secondary growth in Arabidopsis roots. Cytokinins directly activate transcription of two homologous LBD genes, LBD3 and LBD4. Two other homologous LBDs, LBD1 and LBD11, are induced only after prolonged cytokinin treatment. Our genetic studies revealed a two stage mechanism downstream of cytokinin signaling: while LBD3 and LBD4 regulate activation of secondary growth, LBD1, LBD3, LBD4, and LBD11 together promote further radial growth and maintenance of cambial stem cells. LBD overexpression promoted rapid cell growth followed by accelerated cell divisions, thus leading to enhanced secondary growth. Finally, we show that LBDs rapidly inhibit cytokinin signaling. Together, our data suggest that the cambium-promoting LBDs negatively feed back into cytokinin signaling to keep root secondary growth in balance.
  • Choi, Jaeyoung; Kim, Ki-Tae; Huh, Aram; Kwon, Seomun; Hong, Changyoung; Asiegbu, Fred O.; Jeon, Junhyun; Lee, Yong-Hwan (2015)
    Over the past two decades, epigenetics has evolved into a key concept for understanding regulation of gene expression. Among many epigenetic mechanisms, covalent modifications such as acetylation and methylation of lysine residues on core histones emerged as a major mechanism in epigenetic regulation. Here, we present the database for histone-modifying enzymes (dbHiMo; http://hme.riceblast.snu.ac.kr/) aimed at facilitating functional and comparative analysis of histone-modifying enzymes (HMEs). HMEs were identified by applying a search pipeline built upon profile hidden Markov model (HMM) to proteomes. The database incorporates 11 576 HMEs identified from 603 proteomes including 483 fungal, 32 plants and 51 metazoan species. The dbHiMo provides users with web-based personalized data browsing and analysis tools, supporting comparative and evolutionary genomics. With comprehensive data entries and associated web-based tools, our database will be a valuable resource for future epigenetics/epigenomics studies.
  • Tammimäki, Anne; Aonurm-Helm, Anu; Männistö, Pekka T. (2018)
    1.Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) is involved in the O-methylation of l-DOPA, dopamine, and other catechols. The enzyme is expressed in two isoforms: soluble (S-COMT), which resides in the cytoplasm, and membrane-bound (MB-COMT), which is anchored to intracellular membranes. 2.To obtain specific information on the functions of COMT isoforms, we studied how a complete MB-COMT deficiency affects the total COMT activity in the body, peripheral l-DOPA levels, and metabolism after l-DOPA (10mg kg(-1)) plus carbidopa (30mg kg(-1)) administration by gastric tube in wild-type (WT) and MB-COMT-deficient mice. l-DOPA and 3-O-methyl-l-DOPA (3-OMD) levels were assayed in plasma, duodenum, and liver. 3.We showed that the selective lack of MB-COMT did not alter the total COMT activity, COMT enzyme kinetics, l-DOPA levels, or the total O-methylation of l-DOPA but delayed production of 3-OMD in plasma and peripheral tissues.
  • Feng, Shaohong; Stiller, Josefin; Deng, Yuan; Armstrong, Joel; Fang, Qi; Reeve, Andrew Hart; Xie, Duo; Chen, Guangji; Guo, Chunxue; Faircloth, Brant C.; Petersen, Bent; Wang, Zongji; Zhou, Qi; Diekhans, Mark; Chen, Wanjun; Andreu-Sanchez, Sergio; Margaryan, Ashot; Howard, Jason Travis; Parent, Carole; Pacheco, George; Sinding, Mikkel-Holger S.; Puetz, Lara; Cavill, Emily; Ribeiro, Angela M.; Eckhart, Leopold; Fjeldsa, Jon; Hosner, Peter A.; Brumfield, Robb T.; Christidis, Les; Bertelsen, Mads F.; Sicheritz-Ponten, Thomas; Tietze, Dieter Thomas; Robertson, Bruce C.; Song, Gang; Borgia, Gerald; Claramunt, Santiago; Lovette, Irby J.; Cowen, Saul J.; Njoroge, Peter; Dumbacher, John Philip; Ryder, Oliver A.; Fuchs, Jerome; Bunce, Michael; Burt, David W.; Cracraft, Joel; Meng, Guanliang; Hackett, Shannon J.; Ryan, Peter G.; Jønsson, Knud Andreas; Jamieson, Ian G.; da Fonseca, Rute R.; Braun, Edward L.; Houde, Peter; Mirarab, Siavash; Suh, Alexander; Hansson, Bengt; Ponnikas, Suvi; Sigeman, Hanna; Stervander, Martin; Frandsen, Paul B.; van der Zwan, Henriette; van der Sluis, Rencia; Visser, Carina; Balakrishnan, Christopher N.; Clark, Andrew G.; Fitzpatrick, John W.; Bowman, Reed; Chen, Nancy; Cloutier, Alison; Sackton, Timothy B.; Edwards, Scott V.; Foote, Dustin J.; Shakya, Subir B.; Sheldon, Frederick H.; Vignal, Alain; Soares, Andre E. R.; Shapiro, Beth; Gonzalez-Solis, Jacob; Ferrer-Obiol, Joan; Rozas, Julio; Riutort, Marta; Tigano, Anna; Friesen, Vicki; Dalen, Love; Urrutia, Araxi O.; Szekely, Tamas; Liu, Yang; Campana, Michael G.; Corvelo, Andre; Fleischer, Robert C.; Rutherford, Kim M.; Gemmell, Neil J.; Dussex, Nicolas; Mouritsen, Henrik; Thiele, Nadine; Delmore, Kira; Liedvogel, Miriam; Franke, Andre; Hoeppner, Marc P.; Krone, Oliver; Fudickar, Adam M.; Mila, Borja; Ketterson, Ellen D.; Fidler, Andrew Eric; Friis, Guillermo; Parody-Merino, Angela M.; Battley, Phil F.; Cox, Murray P.; Lima, Nicholas Costa Barroso; Prosdocimi, Francisco; Parchman, Thomas Lee; Schlinger, Barney A.; Loiselle, Bette A.; Blake, John G.; Lim, Haw Chuan; Day, Lainy B.; Fuxjager, Matthew J.; Baldwin, Maude W.; Braun, Michael J.; Wirthlin, Morgan; Dikow, Rebecca B.; Ryder, T. Brandt; Camenisch, Glauco; Keller, Lukas F.; DaCosta, Jeffrey M.; Hauber, Mark E.; Louder, Matthew I. M.; Witt, Christopher C.; McGuire, Jimmy A.; Mudge, Joann; Megna, Libby C.; Carling, Matthew D.; Wang, Biao; Taylor, Scott A.; Del-Rio, Glaucia; Aleixo, Alexandre; Vasconcelos, Ana Tereza Ribeiro; Mello, Claudio V.; Weir, Jason T.; Haussler, David; Li, Qiye; Yang, Huanming; Wang, Jian; Lei, Fumin; Rahbek, Carsten; Gilbert, M. Thomas P.; Graves, Gary R.; Jarvis, Erich D.; Paten, Benedict; Zhang, Guojie (2020)
    Whole-genome sequencing projects are increasingly populating the tree of life and characterizing biodiversity(1-4). Sparse taxon sampling has previously been proposed to confound phylogenetic inference(5), and captures only a fraction of the genomic diversity. Here we report a substantial step towards the dense representation of avian phylogenetic and molecular diversity, by analysing 363 genomes from 92.4% of bird families-including 267 newly sequenced genomes produced for phase II of the Bird 10,000 Genomes (B10K) Project. We use this comparative genome dataset in combination with a pipeline that leverages a reference-free whole-genome alignment to identify orthologous regions in greater numbers than has previously been possible and to recognize genomic novelties in particular bird lineages. The densely sampled alignment provides a single-base-pair map of selection, has more than doubled the fraction of bases that are confidently predicted to be under conservation and reveals extensive patterns of weak selection in predominantly non-coding DNA. Our results demonstrate that increasing the diversity of genomes used in comparative studies can reveal more shared and lineage-specific variation, and improve the investigation of genomic characteristics. We anticipate that this genomic resource will offer new perspectives on evolutionary processes in cross-species comparative analyses and assist in efforts to conserve species. A dataset of the genomes of 363 species from the Bird 10,000 Genomes Project shows increased power to detect shared and lineage-specific variation, demonstrating the importance of phylogenetically diverse taxon sampling in whole-genome sequencing.
  • Virtanen, Jenni; Aaltonen, Kirsi; Vapalahti, Olli; Sironen, Tarja (2020)
    Aleutian disease (AD), caused by Aleutian mink disease virus (AMDV), causes significant welfare problems to mink, and financial losses to the farmers. As there is no vaccine or treatment available, reliable diagnostics is important for disease control. Here, we set up a probe-based real-time PCR (NS1-probe-PCR) to detect all strains of AMDV. PCR was validated and compared to two other real-time PCR methods (pan-AMDV- and pan-AMDO-PCR) currently used for AMDV diagnostics in Finland. The NS1-probe-PCR had a similar detection limit of 20 copies/reaction based on plasmid dilution series, and similar or better diagnostic sensitivity, when evaluated using spleen samples from mink, and stool samples from mink and foxes. None of the three PCR tests cross-reacted with other parvoviruses. The NS1-probe-PCR also showed a significantly higher specificity than the pan-AMDO-PCR with spleen samples and the best specificity with stool samples. Furthermore, it produced the results more rapidly than the other two PCRs making it a promising tool for both diagnostic and research purposes.
  • Kaurola, Petri; Sharma, Vivek; Vonk, Amanda; Vattulainen, Ilpo; Rog, Tomasz (2016)
    Quinone and its analogues (Q) constitute an important class of compounds that perform key electron transfer reactions in oxidative- and photo-phosphorylation. In the inner membrane of mitochondria, ubiquinone molecules undergo continuous redox transitions enabling electron transfer between the respiratory complexes. In such a dynamic system undergoing continuous turnover for ATP synthesis, an uninterrupted supply of substrate molecules is absolutely necessary. In the current work, we have performed atomistic molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations to assess the structure, dynamics, and localization of quinone and its analogues in a lipid bilayer, whose composition mimics the one in the inner mitochondrial membrane. The results show that there is a strong tendency of both quinone and quinol molecules to localize in the vicinity of the lipids' acyl groups, right under the lipid head group region. Additionally, we observe a second location in the middle of the bilayer where quinone molecules tend to stabilize. Translocation of quinone through a lipid bilayer is very fast and occurs in 10-100 ns time scale, whereas the translocation of quinol is at least an order of magnitude slower. We suggest that this has important mechanistic implications given that the localization of Q ensures maximal occupancy of the Q-binding sites or Q-entry points in electron transport chain complexes, thereby maintaining an optimal turnover rate for ATP synthesis. (C) 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
  • Virtanen, Jori A.; Vartiainen, Maria K. (2017)
    In addition to its essential roles as part of the cytoskeleton, actin has also been linked to many processes in the nucleus. Recent data has demonstrated the presence of both monomeric and polymeric actin in the nucleus, and implied distinct functional roles for these actin pools. Monomeric actin seems to be involved in regulation of gene expression through transcription factors, chromatin regulating complexes and RNA polymerases. In addition to cytoplasmic actin regulators, nuclear proteins, such as emerin, can regulate actin polymerization properties specifically in this compartment. Besides of structural roles, nuclear actin filaments may be required for organizing the nuclear contents and for the maintenance of genomic integrity.
  • Reidelbach, Marco; Zimmer, Christoph; Meunier, Brigitte; Rich, Peter R.; Sharma, Vivek (2021)
    Cellular respiration is a fundamental process required for energy production in many organisms. The terminal electron transfer complex in mitochondrial and many bacterial respiratory chains is cytochrome c oxidase (CcO). This converts the energy released in the cytochrome c/oxygen redox reaction into a transmembrane proton electrochemical gradient that is used subsequently to power ATP synthesis. Despite detailed knowledge of electron and proton transfer paths, a central question remains as to whether the coupling between electron and proton transfer in mammalian mitochondrial forms of CcO is mechanistically equivalent to its bacterial counterparts. Here, we focus on the conserved span between H376 and G384 of transmembrane helix (TMH) X of subunit I. This conformationally-dynamic section has been suggested to link the redox activity with the putative H pathway of proton transfer in mammalian CcO. The two helix X mutants, Val380Met (V380M) and Gly384Asp (G384D), generated in the genetically-tractable yeast CcO, resulted in a respiratory-deficient phenotype caused by the inhibition of intra-protein electron transfer and CcO turnover. Molecular aspects of these variants were studied by long timescale atomistic molecular dynamics simulations performed on wild-type and mutant bovine and yeast CcOs. We identified redox- and mutation-state dependent conformational changes in this span of TMH X of bovine and yeast CcOs which strongly suggests that this dynamic module plays a key role in optimizing intra-protein electron transfers.
  • Dong, Yujiao; Paukkonen, Heli; Fang, Wenwen; Kontturi, Eero; Laaksonen, Timo; Laaksonen, Paivi (2018)
    Drug release from a new type of matrix material consisting of partially fibrillated microcrystalline cellulose was investigated. A mechanical treatment of novel AaltoCell T cellulose microcrystals caused partial opening of the nanofibrillary structure of the cellulose particles and entanglement of individual particles led into formation of an elastic network of microcrystalline cellulose. The rheological properties of the stable hydrogel-like materials were characterised by shear rheometry. Model compounds metronidazole and lysozyme were successfully employed in drug release experiments carried out by delignified (bleached) and lignin-containing matrices. The viscosity as well as the lignin-content played a role in the release dynamics of the drugs. Microcrystalline AaltoCell T was proven as high-performing material for diffusion controlled release of the chosen model compounds and can be seen as a safe and economical alternative for novel matrix materials such as nanocellulose or cellulose derivatives.
  • Mannerström, Bettina; Kornilov, Roman; Abu-Shahba, Ahmed G.; Chowdhury, Iftekhar M.; Sinha, Snehadri; Seppänen-Kaijansinkko, Riitta; Kaur, Sippy (2019)
    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are central to intercellular communication and play an important role in cancer progression and development. Osteosarcoma (OS) is an aggressive bone tumour, characterized by the presence of malignant mesenchymal cells. The specific tumour-driving genetic alterations that are associated with OS development are currently poorly understood. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) of osteogenic lineage have been postulated as likely candidates as the cells of origin for OS, thus indicating that MSCs and OS stroma cells may be related cell types. Therefore, this study set out to examine the EV-mediated intercellular crosstalk of MSCs and OS. MSCs and pre-osteoblasts were treated with OS-EVs at different time points, and the epigenetic signature of OS-EVs was assessed by methylation analysis of LINE-1 (long interspersed element) and tumour suppressor genes. In addition, surface markers and expression of specific genes were also evaluated. Our data indicated that OS-EVs mediated LINE-1 hypomethylation in MSCs, whereas an opposite effect was seen in pre-osteoblasts, indicating that MSCs but not pre-osteoblasts were susceptible to epigenetic transformation. Thus, OS-EVs modulated the fate of MSCs by modulating the epigenetic status, and also influenced the expression of genes related to bone microenvironment remodelling. Overall, this study provided evidence that epigenetic regulation appears to be an early event in the transformation of MSCs during the development of OS. Elucidating the mechanisms of EV-mediated communication may lead to new avenues for therapeutic exploitation.
  • Deptula, Paulina; Chamlagain, Bhawani; Edelmann, Minnamari; Sangsuwan, Panchanit; Nyman, Tuula A.; Savijoki, Kirsi; Piironen, Vieno; Varmanen, Pekka (2017)
    Propionibacterium freudenreichii is a traditional dairy bacterium and a producer of short chain fatty acids (propionic and acetic acids) as well as vitamin B12. In food applications, it is a promising organism for in situ fortification with B12 vitamin since it is generally recognized as safe (GRAS) and it is able to synthesize biologically active form of the vitamin. In the present study, vitamin B12 and pseudovitamin biosynthesis by P. freudenreichii was monitored by UHPLC as a function of growth in food-like conditions using a medium mimicking cheese environment, without cobalt or 5,6-dimethylbenzimidazole (DMBI) supplementation. Parallel growth experiments were performed in industrial-type medium known to support the biosynthesis of vitamin B12. The production of other key metabolites in the two media were determined by HPLC, while the global protein production was compared by gel-based proteomics to assess the effect of growth conditions on the physiological status of the strain and on the synthesis of different forms of vitamin. The results revealed distinct protein andmetabolite production, which reflected the growth conditions and the potential of P. freudenreichii for synthesizing nutritionally relevant amounts of active vitamin B12 regardless of the metabolic state of the cells.
  • Inamdar, Kaushik; Tsai, Feng-Ching; Dibsy, Rayane; de Poret, Aurore; Manzi, John; Merida, Peggy; Muller, Remi; Lappalainen, Pekka; Roingeard, Philippe; Mak, Johnson; Bassereau, Patricia; Favard, Cyril; Muriaux, Delphine (2021)
    During HIV-1 particle formation, the requisite plasma membrane curvature is thought to be solely driven by the retroviral Gag protein. Here, we reveal that the cellular I-BAR protein IRSp53 is required for the progression of HIV-1 membrane curvature to complete particle assembly. siRNA-mediated knockdown of IRSp53 gene expression induces a decrease in viral particle production and a viral bud arrest at half completion. Single-molecule localization microscopy at the cell plasma membrane shows a preferential localization of IRSp53 around HIV-1 Gag assembly sites. In addition, we observe the presence of IRSp53 in purified HIV-1 particles. Finally, HIV-1 Gag protein preferentially localizes to curved membranes induced by IRSp53 I-BAR domain on giant unilamellar vesicles. Overall, our data reveal a strong interplay between IRSp53 I-BAR and Gag at membranes during virus assembly. This highlights IRSp53 as a crucial host factor in HIV-1 membrane curvature and its requirement for full HIV-1 particle assembly.