Browsing by Subject "human"

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  • Omoruyi, I.M.; Pohjanvirta, R. (2018)
    Mounting evidence of the effects of endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in humans has led to assaying a vast array of food items (processed or packaged) as possible sources of human exposure to estrogens. In this study, we investigated the current situation in this respect of different food supplements and beer brands. Eleven food supplements and 24 beer brands were obtained from Helsinki, Finland. Sample preparation was carried out by established methods while estrogenic activities were assessed by a yeast bioluminescent assay, using two recombinant yeast strains (Saccharomyces cerevisiae BMAEREluc/ERα and S. cerevisiae BMA64/luc). All the food supplements as well as 81% of the beer samples tested were found to be estrogenic, with estradiol equivalent concentrations of food supplements and beer brands ranging from 7.5 to 11.5 µg/ml and from below detection limits to 43.6 ng/ml, respectively. The estrogenic activities detected in beer samples were not dependent on the beer's alcoholic content, the country of production, or the size of the production brewery. The results of our study imply that both food supplements and beers can be a significant source of human exposure to estrogens. Therefore, further studies and regular surveillance are warranted. © 2018, © 2018 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.
  • Kuchenbaecker, K.B.; McGuffog, L.; Barrowdale, D.; Lee, Andrew; Soucy, P.; Dennis, J.; Domchek, S.M.; Robson, M.; Spurdle, A.B.; Ramus, S.J.; Mavaddat, N.; Terry, M.B.; Neuhausen, S.L.; Schmutzler, R.K.; Simard, J.; Pharoah, P.D.P.; Offit, K.; Couch, F.J.; Chenevix-Trench, G.; Easton, D.F.; Antoniou, A.C.; Healey, S.; Lush, M.; Hamann, U.; Southey, M.; John, E.M.; Chung, W.K.; Daly, M. B.; Buys, S.S.; Goldgar, D.E.; Dorfling, C.M.; van Rensburg, E.J.; Ding, Y.C.; Ejlertsen, B.; Gerdes, A.-M.; Hansen, T.V.O.; Slager, S.; Hallberg, E.; Benitez, J.; Osorio, A.; Cohen, N.; Lawler, W.; Weitzel, J.N.; Peterlongo, P.; Pensotti, V.; Dolcetti, R.; Barile, M.; Aittomäki, K.; Nevanlinna, H.; Rantala, J. (2017)
    Background: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified 94 common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with breast cancer (BC) risk and 18 associated with ovarian cancer (OC) risk. Several of these are also associated with risk of BC or OC for women who carry a pathogenic mutation in the high-risk BC and OC genes BRCA1 or BRCA2. The combined effects of these variants on BC or OC risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers have not yet been assessed while their clinical management could benefit from improved personalized risk estimates. Methods: We constructed polygenic risk scores (PRS) using BC and OC susceptibility SNPs identified through population-based GWAS: for BC (overall, estrogen receptor [ER]-positive, and ER-negative) and for OC. Using data from 15 252 female BRCA1 and 8211 BRCA2 carriers, the association of each PRS with BC or OC risk was evaluated using a weighted cohort approach, with time to diagnosis as the outcome and estimation of the hazard ratios (HRs) per standard deviation increase in the PRS. Results: The PRS for ER-negative BC displayed the strongest association with BC risk in BRCA1 carriers (HR = 1.27, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.23 to 1.31, P = 8.2 × 10-53). InBRCA2 carriers, the strongest association with BC risk was seen for the overall BCPRS (HR = 1.22, 95% CI = 1.17 to 1.28, P = 7.2 × 10-20). The OC PRS was strongly associated with OC risk for both BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers. These translate to differences in absolute risks (more than 10% in each case) between the top and bottom deciles of the PRS distribution; for example, the OC risk was 6% by age 80 years for BRCA2 carriers at the 10th percentile of the OC PRS compared with 19% risk for those at the 90th percentile of PRS. Conclusions: BC and OC PRS are predictive of cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers. Incorporation of the PRS into risk prediction models has promise to better inform decisions on cancer risk management. © The Author 2017.
  • Paavola, Mika; Malmivaara, Antti; Taimela, Simo; Kanto, Kari; Järvinen, Teppo L. N. (2017)
    Introduction: Arthroscopic subacromial decompression (ASD) is the most commonly performed surgical intervention for shoulder pain, yet evidence on its efficacy is limited. The rationale for the surgery rests on the tenet that symptom relief is achieved through decompression of the rotator cuff tendon passage. The primary objective of this superiority trial is to compare the efficacy of ASD versus diagnostic arthroscopy (DA) in patients with shoulder impingement syndrome (SIS), where DA differs only by the lack of subacromial decompression. A third group of supervised progressive exercise therapy (ET) will allow for pragmatic assessment of the relative benefits of surgical versus non-operative treatment strategies. Methods and Analysis: Finnish Subacromial Impingement Arthroscopy Controlled Trial is an ongoing multicentre, three-group randomised controlled study. We performed two-fold concealed allocation, first by randomising patients to surgical (ASD or DA) or conservative (ET) treatment in 2:1 ratio and then those allocated to surgery further to ASD or DA in 1:1 ratio. Our two primary outcomes are pain at rest and at arm activity, assessed using visual analogue scale (VAS). We will quantify the treatment effect as the difference between the groups in the change in the VAS scales with the associated 95% CI at 24 months. Our secondary outcomes are functional assessment (Constant score and Simple shoulder test), quality of life (15D and SF-36), patient satisfaction, proportions of responders and non-responders, reoperations/treatment conversions, all at 2 years post-randomisation, as well as adverse effects and complications. We recruited a total of 210 patients from three tertiary referral centres. We will conduct the primary analysis on the intention-to-treat basis. Ethics and Dissemination: The study was approved by the Institutional Review Board of the Pirkanmaa Hospital District and duly registered at ClinicalTrials.gov. The findings of this study will be disseminated widely through peer-reviewed publications and conference presentations. © 2017 Article author(s).
  • Viisanen, Tyyne; Gazali, Ahmad M.; Ihantola, Emmi-Leena; Ekman, Ilse; Näntö-Salonen, Kirsti; Veijola, Riitta; Toppari, Jorma; Knip, Mikael; Ilonen, Jorma; Kinnunen, Tuure (2019)
    The dysfunction of FOXP3-positive regulatory T cells (Tregs) plays a key role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases, including type 1 diabetes (T1D). However, previous studies analyzing the peripheral blood Treg compartment in patients with T1D have yielded partially conflicting results. Moreover, the phenotypic complexity of peripheral blood Tregs during the development of human T1D has not been comprehensively analyzed. Here, we used multi-color flow cytometry to analyze the frequency of distinct Treg subsets in blood samples from a large cohort comprising of 74 children with newly diagnosed T1D, 76 autoantibody-positive children at-risk for T1D and 180 age- and HLA-matched control children. The frequency of CD4+CD25+CD127lowFOXP3+ Tregs was higher in children with T1D compared to control children, and this change was attributable to a higher proportion of naive Tregs in these subjects. Further longitudinal analyses demonstrated that the increase in Treg frequency correlated with disease onset. The frequencies of the minor subsets of CD25+FOXP3low memory Tregs as well as CD25lowCD127lowFOXP3+ Tregs were also increased in children with T1D. Moreover, the ratio of CCR6-CXCR3+ and CCR6+CXCR3- memory Tregs was altered and the frequency of proliferating Ki67-positive and IFN-gamma producing memory Tregs was decreased in children with T1D. The frequency of CXCR5+FOXP3+ circulating follicular T regulatory cells was not altered in children with T1D. Importantly, none of the alterations observed in children with T1D were observed in autoantibody-positive at-risk children. In conclusion, our study reveals multiple alterations in the peripheral blood Treg compartment at the diagnosis of T1D that appear not to be features of early islet autoimmunity.
  • Global Burden of Disease Self-Harm Collaboration; Orpana, H.M.; Doku, D.T.; Meretoja, T.J.; Shiri, R.; Vasankari, T. (2019)
    Objectives To use the estimates from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2016 to describe patterns of suicide mortality globally, regionally, and for 195 countries and territories by age, sex, and Socio-demographic index, and to describe temporal trends between 1990 and 2016. Design Systematic analysis. Main outcome measures Crude and age standardised rates from suicide mortality and years of life lost were compared across regions and countries, and by age, sex, and Socio-demographic index (a composite measure of fertility, income, and education). Results The total number of deaths from suicide increased by 6.7% (95% uncertainty interval 0.4% to 15.6%) globally over the 27 year study period to 817 000 (762 000 to 884 000) deaths in 2016. However, the age standardised mortality rate for suicide decreased by 32.7% (27.2% to 36.6%) worldwide between 1990 and 2016, similar to the decline in the global age standardised mortality rate of 30.6%. Suicide was the leading cause of age standardised years of life lost in the Global Burden of Disease region of high income Asia Pacific and was among the top 10 leading causes in eastern Europe, central Europe, western Europe, central Asia, Australasia, southern Latin America, and high income North America. Rates for men were higher than for women across regions, countries, and age groups, except for the 15 to 19 age group. There was variation in the female to male ratio, with higher ratios at lower levels of Socio-demographic index. Women experienced greater decreases in mortality rates (49.0%, 95% uncertainty interval 42.6% to 54.6%) than men (23.8%, 15.6% to 32.7%). Conclusions Age standardised mortality rates for suicide have greatly reduced since 1990, but suicide remains an important contributor to mortality worldwide. Suicide mortality was variable across locations, between sexes, and between age groups. Suicide prevention strategies can be targeted towards vulnerable populations if they are informed by variations in mortality rates. © Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited.
  • Global Burden of Disease Cancer Collaboration; Fitzmaurice, C.; Doku, D.T.; Hadkhale, K.; Meretoja, T.J.; Neupane, S. (2019)
    Importance: Cancer and other noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) are now widely recognized as a threat to global development. The latest United Nations high-level meeting on NCDs reaffirmed this observation and also highlighted the slow progress in meeting the 2011 Political Declaration on the Prevention and Control of Noncommunicable Diseases and the third Sustainable Development Goal. Lack of situational analyses, priority setting, and budgeting have been identified as major obstacles in achieving these goals. All of these have in common that they require information on the local cancer epidemiology. The Global Burden of Disease (GBD) study is uniquely poised to provide these crucial data. Objective: To describe cancer burden for 29 cancer groups in 195 countries from 1990 through 2017 to provide data needed for cancer control planning. Evidence Review: We used the GBD study estimation methods to describe cancer incidence, mortality, years lived with disability, years of life lost, and disability-Adjusted life-years (DALYs). Results are presented at the national level as well as by Socio-demographic Index (SDI), a composite indicator of income, educational attainment, and total fertility rate. We also analyzed the influence of the epidemiological vs the demographic transition on cancer incidence. Findings: In 2017, there were 24.5 million incident cancer cases worldwide (16.8 million without nonmelanoma skin cancer [NMSC]) and 9.6 million cancer deaths. The majority of cancer DALYs came from years of life lost (97%), and only 3% came from years lived with disability. The odds of developing cancer were the lowest in the low SDI quintile (1 in 7) and the highest in the high SDI quintile (1 in 2) for both sexes. In 2017, the most common incident cancers in men were NMSC (4.3 million incident cases); tracheal, bronchus, and lung (TBL) cancer (1.5 million incident cases); and prostate cancer (1.3 million incident cases). The most common causes of cancer deaths and DALYs for men were TBL cancer (1.3 million deaths and 28.4 million DALYs), liver cancer (572000 deaths and 15.2 million DALYs), and stomach cancer (542000 deaths and 12.2 million DALYs). For women in 2017, the most common incident cancers were NMSC (3.3 million incident cases), breast cancer (1.9 million incident cases), and colorectal cancer (819000 incident cases). The leading causes of cancer deaths and DALYs for women were breast cancer (601000 deaths and 17.4 million DALYs), TBL cancer (596000 deaths and 12.6 million DALYs), and colorectal cancer (414000 deaths and 8.3 million DALYs). Conclusions and Relevance: The national epidemiological profiles of cancer burden in the GBD study show large heterogeneities, which are a reflection of different exposures to risk factors, economic settings, lifestyles, and access to care and screening. The GBD study can be used by policy makers and other stakeholders to develop and improve national and local cancer control in order to achieve the global targets and improve equity in cancer care. © 2019 American Medical Association. All rights reserved.
  • Fagerstedt, Klaus W.; Böhling, Tom; Sihto, Harri; Salonen, Tarja; Zhao, Fang; Kero, Mia; Andersson, Leif C.; Arola, Johanna (2021)
    Mixed neuroendocrine-non-neuroendocrine neoplasms (MINEN) are rare tumors that consist of at least 30% of both neuroendocrine and non-neuroendocrine components. The data concerning the pathogenesis of MINEN suggest a monoclonal origin. We describe a spontaneously immortalized cell line derived from gastric MINEN called GNEN-1. Primary tumor consisted of components of high-grade neuroendocrine carcinoma and adenocarcinoma. The GNEN-1 cell line was initiated from metastatic tumor cells of peritoneal fluid and expresses a purely neuroendocrine phenotype. The GNEN-1 cell line grows as monolayers and has retained the neuroendocrine phenotype with positivity for chromogranin A in immunohistochemistry. Electron microscopy showed cytoplasmic dense core granules and axon hillocks. The karyotype revealed alterations typical of both adenocarcinoma and neuroendocrine carcinoma such as trisomy 7 and 8. GNEN-1 cells were also positive for stanniocalcin-1, a marker of poor prognosis in gastric carcinomas. Expression of several markers related to neuroendocrine tumors was found. There have been only a few studies on the pathogenesis of MINEN and management of the disease due to the rarity of this tumor type. Here we describe for the first time an immortalized cell line derived from mixed gastric NEN. The GNEN-1 line offers a tool for future research on gastric NEN. © 2021 The authors.
  • Savarese, M.; Qureshi, T.; Torella, A.; Laine, P.; Giugliano, T.; Jonson, P.H.; Johari, M.; Paulin, L.; Piluso, G.; Auvinen, P.; Nigro, V.; Udd, Bjarne; Hackman, P. (2020)
    Although DNA-sequencing is the most effective procedure to achieve a molecular diagnosis in genetic diseases, complementary RNA analyses are often required. Reverse-Transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) is still a valuable option when the clinical phenotype and/or available DNA-test results address the diagnosis toward a gene of interest or when the splicing effect of a single variant needs to be assessed. We use Single-Molecule Real-Time sequencing to detect and characterize splicing defects and single nucleotide variants in well-known disease genes (DMD, NF1, TTN). After proper optimization, the procedure could be used in the diagnostic setting, simplifying the workflow of cDNA analysis. © 2020 - IOS Press and the authors. All rights reserved.
  • eQTLGen Consortium (2018)
    Understanding the difference in genetic regulation of gene expression between brain and blood is important for discovering genes for brain-related traits and disorders. Here, we estimate the correlation of genetic effects at the top-associated cis-expression or -DNA methylation (DNAm) quantitative trait loci (cis-eQTLs or cis-mQTLs) between brain and blood (r b ). Using publicly available data, we find that genetic effects at the top cis-eQTLs or mQTLs are highly correlated between independent brain and blood samples (r b = 0.70 for cis-eQTLs and r ^ b = 0.78 for cis-mQTLs). Using meta-analyzed brain cis-eQTL/mQTL data (n = 526 to 1194), we identify 61 genes and 167 DNAm sites associated with four brain-related phenotypes, most of which are a subset of the discoveries (97 genes and 295 DNAm sites) using data from blood with larger sample sizes (n = 1980 to 14,115). Our results demonstrate the gain of power in gene discovery for brain-related phenotypes using blood cis-eQTL/mQTL data with large sample sizes. © 2018 The Author(s).
  • Saari, Sisko (2006)
    The study deals with Max Scheler, Erik Ahlman and Lauri Rauhala's ideas of the human being, and its focus is on spirituality, values and the question 'what is a human being?'. Scheler applies the phenomenological method to e.g. ethics, religious philosophy and sociology. According to Scheler's outlook on life, emotion – in its spiritual form – guides and defines the contents of life, rules the world and history, but emotion is also irrational and makes the source of creative energy. Furthermore, Scheler favours metaphysical individualism which puts emphasis on the 'self's' independency and value as concrete and existential and denies its deriving from the idea of spiritual. In spirituality the human being is somehow committed to deity. Spirituality is however an autonomous and original circle of being, self-supporting and super-individual. Spiritual activity is a person's activity. A person is a psychophysical whole. Human beings are part of the Cosmos. Ahlman studies the human being with the aid of special features deriving from spirituality. The prime mover of spiritual activity is the spiritual fundament of the human being. It is not the same as the conscious, thinking ego but by thinking we can become aware of it. The spirit is self-understanding. As Ahlman puts it, the human being is a rational being which is equipped with the ability to understand oneself. The word 'spirit' is positive to its value. The superego is the spirit's implementation in the human being. Truthfulness and emotionality make the spirit. Volition's world takes action in the human being. It is singular and absolute but also problematic: volition has emotions with it. Volition manifests itself as ethical awareness. Its special quality becomes clear in expressions. All activity contains intuition. Intuition makes us understand what cannot be understood by sense. Intuition goes hand in hand with intellect and serves it. Values and volition are inner realities, even though they have their expression on the outside. Metaphysics appears in the human being's impersonality: the human being approaches the spirit, represents a timeless idea. Rauhala takes the human being as an individual, a holistic whole, applying the idea of the human being and the view on the human being, the ontological-philosophical analysis to his studies. According to Rauhala's trichotomy, the concept of being consists of physicality, consciousness and situationality. Those are features which have rational grounds. Spirituality belongs to the highest level of consciousness. The human being's uniqueness in the world is based on the hidden wisdom of evolution in that the human being has developed awareness of the ego and the world. The human being is a person. Features of humanity are e.g. consciousness, intentionality, the unconscious, the conscious and ethicality. To work ethicality requires a human individual. The distinguishing feature of these three philosophers is their different approach to the problem. Common for them are their aims to obtain knowledge to solve the problem of the human being. Main sources: - Ahlman, Erik: Ihmisen probleemi - johdatus filosofisen antropologian kysymyksiin (1953), Arvojen ja välineitten maailma - eetillis-idealistinen maailmantarkastelukoe (1920), Totuudellisuuden probleemi (1929), Kulttuurin perustekijöitä - kulttuurifilosofisia tarkasteluja (1939). - Rauhala, Lauri: Ihmiskäsitys ihmistyössä (1983), Henkinen ihmisessä (1992), Ihmisen ainutlaatuisuus (1998). - Scheler, Max: Der Formalismus in der Ethik und die Materiale Wertethik - Neuer Versuch der Grundlegung eines ethischen Personalismus (1954), Die Stellung des Menschen im Kosmos (1930).
  • Vink, P.; Torrell, J.M.R.; Fructuoso, A.S.; Kim, Sung-Joo; Kim, Sang-Il; Zaltzman, J.; Ortiz, F.; Plana, J.M.C.; Rodriguez, A.M.F.; Rodrigo, H.R.; Marti, M.C.; Perez, R.; Roncero, F.M.G.; Kumar, D.; Chiang, Y.-J.; Doucette, K.; Pipeleers, L.; Morales, M.L.A.; Rodriguez-Ferrero, M.L.; Secchi, Antonio; McNeil, S.A.; Campora, L.; Di Paolo, E.; El Idrissi, M.; López-Fauqued, M.; Salaun, B.; Heineman, T.C.; Oostvogels, L. (2020)
    Background. The incidence of herpes zoster is up to 9 times higher in immunosuppressed solid organ transplant recipients than in the general population. We investigated the immunogenicity and safety of an adjuvanted recombinant zoster vaccine (RZV) in renal transplant (RT) recipients ≥18 years of age receiving daily immunosuppressive therapy. Methods. In this phase 3, randomized (1:1), observer-blind, multicenter trial, RT recipients were enrolled and received 2 doses of RZV or placebo 1-2 months (M) apart 4-18M posttransplant. Anti-glycoprotein E (gE) antibody concentrations, gE-specific CD4 T-cell frequencies, and vaccine response rates were assessed at 1M post-dose 1, and 1M and 12M post-dose 2. Solicited and unsolicited adverse events (AEs) were recorded for 7 and 30 days after each dose, respectively. Solicited general symptoms and unsolicited AEs were also collected 7 days before first vaccination. Serious AEs (including biopsy-proven allograft rejections) and potential immune-mediated diseases (pIMDs) were recorded up to 12M post-dose 2. Results. Two hundred sixty-four participants (RZV: 132; placebo: 132) were enrolled between March 2014 and April 2017. gE-specific humoral and cell-mediated immune responses were higher in RZV than placebo recipients across postvaccination time points and persisted above prevaccination baseline 12M post-dose 2. Local AEs were reported more frequently by RZV than placebo recipients. Overall occurrences of renal function changes, rejections, unsolicited AEs, serious AEs, and pIMDs were similar between groups. Conclusions. RZV was immunogenic in chronically immunosuppressed RT recipients. Immunogenicity persisted through 12M postvaccination. No safety concerns arose. © The Author(s) 2019.
  • Scharenberg, Marlena; Vangeti, Sindhu; Kekäläinen, Eliisa; Bergman, Per; Al-Ameri, Mamdoh; Johansson, Niclas; Sonden, Klara; Falck-Jones, Sara; Färnert, Anna; Ljunggren, Hans-Gustaf; Michaelsson, Jakob; Smed-Sörensen, Anna; Marquardt, Nicole (2019)
    NK cells in the human lung respond to influenza A virus-(IAV-) infected target cells. However, the detailed functional capacity of human lung and peripheral blood NK cells remains to be determined in IAV and other respiratory viral infections. Here, we investigated the effects of IAV infection on human lung and peripheral blood NK cells in vitro and ex vivo following clinical infection. IAV infection of lung- and peripheral blood-derived mononuclear cells in vitro induced NK cell hyperresponsiveness to K562 target cells, including increased degranulation and cytokine production particularly in the CD56(bright)CD16(-) subset of NK cells. Furthermore, lung CD16(-) NK cells showed increased IAV-mediated but target cell-independent activation compared to CD16(+) lung NK cells or total NK cells in peripheral blood. IAV infection rendered peripheral blood NK cells responsive toward the normally NK cell-resistant lung epithelial cell line A549, indicating that NK cell activation during IAV infection could contribute to killing of surrounding non-infected epithelial cells. In vivo, peripheral blood CD56(dim)CD16(+) and CD56(bright)CD16(-) NK cells were primed during acute IAV infection, and a small subset of CD16(-) CD49a(+)CXCR3(+) NK cells could be identified, with CD49a and CXCR3 potentially promoting homing to and tissue-retention in the lung during acute infection. Together, we show that IAV respiratory viral infections prime otherwise hyporesponsive lung NK cells, indicating that both CD16(+) and CD16(-) NK cells including CD16(-)CD49a(+) tissue-resident NK cells could contribute to host immunity but possibly also tissue damage in clinical IAV infection.
  • Jaiswal, Alok; Yadav, Bhagwan; Wennerberg, Krister; Aittokallio, Tero (Humana press, 2019)
    Methods in Molecular Biology
    High-throughput drug sensitivity testing provides a powerful phenotypic profiling approach to identify effective drug candidates for individual cell lines or patient-derived samples. Here, we describe an experimental-computational pipeline, named target addiction scoring (TAS), which mathematically transforms the drug response profiles into target addiction signatures, and thereby provides a ranking of potential therapeutic targets according to their functional importance in a particular cancer sample. The TAS pipeline makes use of drug polypharmacology to integrate the drug sensitivity and selectivity profiles through systems-wide interconnection networks between drugs and their targets, including both primary protein targets as well as secondary off-targets. We show how the TAS pipeline enables one to identify not only single-target addictions but also combinatorial coaddictions among targets that often underlie synergistic drug combinations. © Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2019.
  • Taipale, Kristian; Tähtinen, Siri; Havunen, Riikka; Koski, Anniina; Liikanen, Ilkka; Pakarinen, Päivi; Koivisto-Korander, Riitta; Kankainen, Matti; Joensuu, Timo; Kanerva, Anna; Hemminki, Akseli (2018)
    After the landmark approval of T-VEC, oncolytic viruses are finding their way to the clinics. However, response rates have still room for improvement, and unfortunately there are currently no available markers to predict responses for oncolytic immunotherapy. Interleukin 8 (IL-8) production is upregulated in many cancers and it also connects to several pathways that have been shown to impair the efficacy of adenoviral immunotherapy. We studied the role of IL-8 in 103 cancer patients treated with oncolytic adenoviruses. We found high baseline serum IL-8 concentration to be independently associated with poor prognosis (p <0.001). Further, normal baseline IL-8 was associated with improved prognostic potential of calculation of the neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (p <0.001). Interestingly, a decrease in IL-8 concentration after treatment with oncolytic adenovirus predicted better overall survival (p <0.001) and higher response rate, although this difference was not significant (p=0.066). We studied the combination of adenovirus and IL-8 neutralizing antibody ex vivo in single cell suspensions and in co-cultures of tumor-associated CD15+ neutrophils and CD3+ tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes derived from fresh patient tumor samples. These results indicate a role for IL-8 as a biomarker in oncolytic virotherapy, but additionally provide a rationale for targeting IL-8 to improve treatment efficacy. In conclusion, curtailing the activity of IL-8 systemically or locally in the tumor microenvironment could improve anti-tumor immune responses resulting in enhanced efficacy of adenoviral immunotherapy of cancer. © Taipale et al.
  • Savarese, Marco; Välipakka, Salla; Johari, Mridul; Hackman, Peter; Udd, Bjarne (2020)
    Human genes have a variable length. Those having a coding sequence of extraordinary length and a high number of exons were almost impossible to sequence using the traditional Sanger-based gene-by-gene approach. High-throughput sequencing has partly overcome the size-related technical issues, enabling a straightforward, rapid and relatively inexpensive analysis of large genes. Several large genes (e.g. TTN, NEB, RYR1, DMD) are recognized as disease-causing in patients with skeletal muscle diseases. However, because of their sheer size, the clinical interpretation of variants in these genes is probably the most challenging aspect of the high-throughput genetic investigation in the field of skeletal muscle diseases. The main aim of this review is to discuss the technical and interpretative issues related to the diagnostic investigation of large genes and to reflect upon the current state of the art and the future advancements in the field. © 2020 - IOS Press and the authors. All rights reserved.
  • van Bijnen, Sam; Kärkkäinen, Salme; Helenius, P.; Parviainen, Tiina M. (2019)
    Specific language impairment (SLI) is a developmental disorder linked to deficient auditory processing. In this magnetoencephalography (MEG) study we investigated a specific prolonged auditory response (N250m) that has been reported predominantly in children and is associated with level of language skills. We recorded auditory responses evoked by sine-wave tones presented alternately to the right and left ear of 9–10-year-old children with SLI (n = 10) and children with typical language development (n = 10). Source analysis was used to isolate the N250m response in the left and right hemisphere. In children with language impairment left-hemisphere N250m responses were enhanced compared to those of controls, while no group difference was found in the right hemisphere. Consequently, language impaired children lacked the typical right-ward asymmetry that was found in control children. Furthermore, left but not right hemisphere N250m responses correlated positively with performance on a phonological processing task in the SLI group exclusively, possibly signifying a compensatory mechanism for delayed maturation of language processing. These results suggest that enhanced left-hemisphere auditory activation reflects a core neurophysiological manifestation of developmental language disorders, and emphasize the relevance of this developmentally specific activation pattern for competent language development. © 2019, The Author(s).
  • Muha, Villo; Williamson, Ritchie; Hills, Rachel; McNeilly, A.D.; McWilliams, T.G.; Alonso, Jana; Schimpl, Marianne; Leney, Aneika C.; Heck, Albert J.R.; Sutherland, Calum; Read, Kevin D.; McCrimmon, Rory J.; Brooks, S.P.; Van Aalten, Daan M.F. (2019)
    O-GlcNAcylation is an abundant post-translational modification in the nervous system, linked to both neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative disease. However, the mechanistic links between these phenotypes and site-specific O-GlcNAcylation remain largely unexplored. Here, we show that Ser517 O-GlcNAcylation of the microtubule-binding protein Collapsin Response Mediator Protein-2 (CRMP2) increases with age. By generating and characterizing a Crmp2S517A knock-in mouse model, we demonstrate that loss of O-GlcNAcylation leads to a small decrease in body weight and mild memory impairment, suggesting that Ser517 O-GlcNAcylation has a small but detectable impact on mouse physiology and cognitive function. © 2019 The Authors. Published by the Royal Society under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/, which permits unrestricted use, provided the original author and source are credited.
  • Kaartinen, Tanja; Luostarinen, Annu; Maliniemi, Pilvi; Keto, Joni; Arvas, Mikko; Belt, Heini; Koponen, Jonna; Loskog, Angelica; Mustjoki, Satu; Porkka, Kimmo; Yla-Herttuala, Seppo; Korhonen, Matti (2017)
    Background. Adoptive T-cell therapy offers new options for cancer treatment. Clinical results suggest that T-cell persistence, depending on T-cell memory, improves efficacy. The use of interleukin (IL)-2 for in vitro T-cell expansion is not straightforward because it drives effector T-cell differentiation but does not promote the formation of T-cell memory. We have developed a cost-effective expansion protocol for chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells with an early memory phenotype. Methods. Lymphocytes were transduced with third-generation lentiviral vectors and expanded using CD3/CD28 microbeads. The effects of altering the IL-2 supplementation (0-300 IU/mL) and length of expansion (10-20 days) on the phenotype of the T-cell products were analyzed. Results. High IL-2 levels led to a decrease in overall generation of early memory T cells by both decreasing central memory T cells and augmenting effectors. T memory stem cells (T-SCM, CD95(+)CD45RO(-)CD45RA(+)CD27(+)) were present variably during T-cell expansion. However, their presence was not IL-2 dependent but was linked to expansion kinetics. CD19-CART cells generated in these conditions displayed in vitro antileukemic activity. In summary, production of CART cells without any cytokine supplementation yielded the highest proportion of early memory T cells, provided a 10 fold cell expansion and the cells were functionally potent. Discussion. The number of early memory T cells in a T-cell preparation can be increased by simply reducing the amount of IL-2 and limiting the length of T-cell expansion, providing cells with potentially higher in vivo performance. These findings are significant for robust and cost:effective T-cell manufacturing.
  • Valve, A.; Kulmala, A.; Followill, D.; Tenhunen, M. (2019)
    Uniform dose distribution with steep lateral gradient within depth range of 0–0.5 cm is crucial to be able to treat small skin lesions. The standard nominal 4 MeV electron beam from Elekta Versa HD linear accelerator was modified with degrading filter to remove the lateral scatter from treatment head and minimize the penumbra. The energy degrading method was verified based on dosimetric properties and output factors (OFs)with comparison of four types of measurement methods. The properties of degraded 4 MeV electron beam and developed electron applicators seem optimal for treating small targets near the skin surface. © 2019 The Authors
  • Melén, Krister; Jalkanen, Pinja; Kukkonen, Jyrki P.; Partinen, Markku; Nohynek, Hanna; Vuorela, Arja; Vaarala, O.; Freitag, Tobias L.; Meri, Seppo; Julkunen, Ilkka (2020)
    Narcolepsy type 1, likely an immune-mediated disease, is characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness and cataplexy. The disease is strongly associated with human leukocyte antigen (HLA) DQB1∗06:02. A significant increase in the incidence of childhood and adolescent narcolepsy was observed after a vaccination campaign with AS03-adjuvanted Pandemrix influenza vaccine in Nordic and several other countries in 2010 and 2011. Previously, it has been suggested that a surface-exposed region of influenza A nucleoprotein, a structural component of the Pandemrix vaccine, shares amino acid residues with the first extracellular domain of the human OX2 orexin/hypocretin receptor eliciting the development of autoantibodies. Here, we analyzed, whether H1N1pdm09 infection or Pandemrix vaccination contributed to the development of autoantibodies to the orexin precursor protein or the OX1 or OX2 receptors. The analysis was based on the presence or absence of autoantibody responses against analyzed proteins. Entire OX1 and OX2 receptors or just their extracellular N-termini were transiently expressed in HuH7 cells to determine specific antibody responses in human sera. Based on our immunofluorescence analysis, none of the 56 Pandemrix-vaccinated narcoleptic patients, 28 patients who suffered from a laboratory-confirmed H1N1pdm09 infection or 19 Pandemrix-vaccinated controls showed specific autoantibody responses to prepro-orexin, orexin receptors or the isolated extracellular N-termini of orexin receptors. We also did not find any evidence for cell-mediated immunity against the N-terminal epitopes of OX2. Our findings do not support the hypothesis that the surface-exposed region of the influenza nucleoprotein A would elicit the development of an immune response against orexin receptors. © 2020 The Authors