Browsing by Subject "16S"

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  • Ritari, Jarmo; Salojärvi, Jarkko; Lahti, Leo; de Vos, Willem M. (2015)
    Background: Current sequencing technology enables taxonomic profiling of microbial ecosystems at high resolution and depth by using the 16S rRNA gene as a phylogenetic marker. Taxonomic assignation of newly acquired data is based on sequence comparisons with comprehensive reference databases to find consensus taxonomy for representative sequences. Nevertheless, even with well-characterised ecosystems like the human intestinal microbiota it is challenging to assign genus and species level taxonomy to 16S rRNA amplicon reads. A part of the explanation may lie in the sheer size of the search space where competition from a multitude of highly similar sequences may not allow reliable assignation at low taxonomic levels. However, when studying a particular environment such as the human intestine, it can be argued that a reference database comprising only sequences that are native to the environment would be sufficient, effectively reducing the search space. Results: We constructed a 16S rRNA gene database based on high-quality sequences specific for human intestinal microbiota, resulting in curated data set consisting of 2473 unique prokaryotic species-like groups and their taxonomic lineages, and compared its performance against the Greengenes and Silva databases. The results showed that regardless of used assignment algorithm, our database improved taxonomic assignation of 16S rRNA sequencing data by enabling significantly higher species and genus level assignation rate while preserving taxonomic diversity and demanding less computational resources. Conclusion: The curated human intestinal 16S rRNA gene taxonomic database of about 2500 species-like groups described here provides a practical solution for significantly improved taxonomic assignment for phylogenetic studies of the human intestinal microbiota.
  • Kaunisto, Kari M.; Roslin, Tomas; Sääksjärvi, Ilari E.; Vesterinen, Eero J. (2017)
    Recent advances in molecular techniques allow us to resolve the diet of unstudied taxa. Odonates are potentially important top-down regulators of many insects. Yet, to date, our knowledge of odonate prey use is based mainly on limited observations of odonates catching or eating their prey. In this study, we examine the potential use of metabarcoding in establishing the diet of three adult odonate species (Lestes sponsa, Enallagma cyathigerum, and Sympetrum danae) at a site in southwestern Finland. To this purpose, we compared three different methods for extracting DNA from fecal samples: the Macherey-Nagel Nucleospin XS kit, a traditional salt extraction, and the Zymo Research Fecal Microprep kit. From these extracts, we amplified group-specific mitochondrial markers (COI and 16S rRNA) from altogether 72 odonate individuals, and compared them to comprehensive reference libraries. The three odonate species show major overlap in diet, with no significant differences between individuals of different size and/or gender, reflecting opportunistic foraging of adult odonates. Of a total of 41 different prey species detected, the most frequently consumed ones were Diptera, with additional records of six other orders. Based on our data, the best DNA extraction method is the traditional salt extraction, as it provides the most information on prey content while also being the most economical. To our knowledge, this is the first study to resolve the species-level diet of adult odonates. Armed with the appropriate methodological caveats, we are ready to examine the ecological role of odonates in both terrestrial and aquatic food webs, and in transferring subsidies between these two realms.
  • Vetterli, Adrien; Hietanen, Susanna; Leskinen, Elina (2016)
    The diversity and dynamics of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and archaea (AOA) nitrifying communities in the sediments of the eutrophic Gulf of Finland (GoF) were investigated. Using clone libraries of ammonia monooxygenase (amoA) gene fragments and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP), we found a low richness of both AOB and AOA. The AOB amoA phylogeny matched that of AOB 16S ribosomal genes from the same samples. AOA communities were characterized by strong spatial variation while AOB communities showed notable temporal patterns. At open sea sites, where transient anoxic conditions prevail, richness of both AOA and AOB was lowest and communities were dominated by organisms with gene signatures unique to the GoF. Given the importance of nitrification as a link between the fixation of nitrogen and its removal from aquatic environments, the low diversity of ammonia-oxidizing microbes across the GoF could be of relevance for ecosystem resilience in the face of rapid global environmental changes. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.