Browsing by Subject "3111 Biomedicine"

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  • Vakkilainen, Svetlana; Constantini, Alice; Taskinen, Mervi; Wartiovaara-Kautto, Ulla; Mäkitie, Outi (2019)
  • Nevala, Riikka; Tukiainen, Erkki; Tarkkanen, Maija; Böhling, Tom; Blomqvist, Carl; Sampo, Mika (2019)
    A single-institution series using a (neo)adjuvant chemotherapy and interdigitated hyperfractionated split-course radiation therapy (CRT) treatment protocol for soft tissue sarcoma was reviewed. Our specific aims were to study recurrence rates and long-term toxicity. Between 1998 and 2016, 89 patients with non-metastatic soft tissue sarcoma were treated with surgery combined with six courses of doxorubicin and ifosfamide and hyperfractionated radiation therapy (42-60 Gy/1.5 Gy twice daily). Patients were considered being at high risk if tumour malignancy grade was high and the tumour fulfilled at least two of the following criteria: size >8 cm, presence of necrosis or vascular invasion. The mean age of the patients was 50.7 years. With a median follow-up of 5.4 years for survivors, the local control rate was 81.4%. Six (7%) patients progressed during neoadjuvant CRT. Seven (8%) patients discontinued the treatment due to toxicity. Eighty-six patients were operated and three (3%) of these developed a long-term complication. The estimated metastasis-free survival was 47.6% and overall survival 53.0% at five years. The limb-salvage rate was 93%. The limb-salvage rate, local control and complication rates were good in these patients with high risk soft tissue sarcoma. Metastases-free survival and overall survival rates were less satisfactory, reflecting the aggressive nature of these tumours.
  • Moilanen, Anne-Mari; Rysa, Jaana; Serpi, Raisa; Mustonen, Erja; Szabo, Zoltan; Aro, Jani; Napankangas, Juha; Tenhunen, Olli; Sutinen, Meeri; Salo, Tuula; Ruskoaho, Heikki (2012)
  • Duggan, Ana T.; Perdomo, Maria F.; Piombino-Mascali, Dario; Marciniak, Stephanie; Poinar, Debi; Emery, Matthew V.; Buchmann, Jan P.; Duchene, Sebastian; Jankauskas, Rimantas; Humphreys, Margaret; Golding, G. Brian; Southon, John; Devault, Alison; Rouillard, Jean-Marie; Sahl, Jason W.; Dutour, Olivier; Hedman, Klaus; Sajantila, Antti; Smith, Geoffrey L.; Holmes, Edward C.; Poinar, Hendrik N. (2016)
    Smallpox holds a unique position in the history of medicine. It was the first disease for which a vaccine was developed and remains the only human disease eradicated by vaccination. Although there have been claims of smallpox in Egypt, India, and China dating back millennia [1-4], the timescale of emergence of the causative agent, variola virus (VARV), and how it evolved in the context of increasingly widespread immunization, have proven controversial [4-9]. In particular, some molecular-clock-based studies have suggested that key events in VARV evolution only occurred during the last two centuries [4-6] and hence in apparent conflict with anecdotal historical reports, although it is difficult to distinguish smallpox from other pustular rashes by description alone. To address these issues, we captured, sequenced, and reconstructed a draft genome of an ancient strain of VARV, sampled from a Lithuanian child mummy dating between 1643 and 1665 and close to the time of several documented European epidemics [1, 2, 10]. When compared to vaccinia virus, this archival strain contained the same pattern of gene degradation as 20th century VARVs, indicating that such loss of gene function had occurred before ca. 1650. Strikingly, the mummy sequence fell basal to all currently sequenced strains of VARV on phylogenetic trees. Molecular-clock analyses revealed a strong clock-like structure and that the timescale of smallpox evolution is more recent than often supposed, with the diversification of major viral lineages only occurring within the 18th and 19th centuries, concomitant with the development of modern vaccination.
  • Papaevgeniou, Nikoletta; Sakellari, Marianthi; Jha, Sweta; Tavernarakis, Nektarios; Holmberg, Carina I.; Gonos, Efstathios S.; Chondrogianni, Niki (2016)
    Aims: Proteasomes are constituents of the cellular proteolytic networks that maintain protein homeostasis through regulated proteolysis of normal and abnormal (in any way) proteins. Genetically mediated proteasome activation in multicellular organisms has been shown to promote longevity and to exert protein antiaggregation activity. In this study, we investigate whether compound-mediated proteasome activation is feasible in a multicellular organism and we dissect the effects of such approach in aging and Alzheimer's disease (AD) progression. Results: Feeding of wild-type Caenorhabditis elegans with 18 alpha-glycyrrhetinic acid (18 alpha-GA; a previously shown proteasome activator in cell culture) results in enhanced levels of proteasome activities that lead to a skinhead-1- and proteasomeactivation-dependent life span extension. The elevated proteasome function confers lower paralysis rates in various AD nematode models accompanied by decreased A beta deposits, thus ultimately decelerating the progression of AD phenotype. More importantly, similar positive results are also delivered when human and murine cells of nervous origin are subjected to 18 alpha-GA treatment. Innovation: This is the first report of the use of 18 alpha-GA, a diet-derived compound as prolongevity and antiaggregation factor in the context of a multicellular organism. Conclusion: Our results suggest that proteasome activation with downstream positive outcomes on aging and AD, an aggregation-related disease, is feasible in a nongenetic manipulation manner in a multicellular organism. Moreover, they unveil the need for identification of antiaging and antiamyloidogenic compounds among the nutrients found in our normal diet.
  • Kahila, Hanna; Marjonen, Heidi; Auvinen, Pauliina; Avela, Kristiina; Riikonen, Raili; Kaminen-Ahola, Nina (2020)
    Abstract Background A pair of dizygotic twins discordantly affected by heavy prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE) was reported previously by Riikonen, suggesting the role of genetic risk or protective factors in the etiology of alcohol-induced developmental disorders. Now, we have re-examined these 25-year-old twins and explored genetic origin of the phenotypic discordancy reminiscent with fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS). Furthermore, we explored alterations in DNA methylation profile of imprinting control region at growth-related insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2)/H19 locus in twins' white blood cells (WBC), which have been associated earlier with alcohol-induced genotype-specific changes in placental tissue. Methods Microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) was used to detect potential submicroscopic chromosomal abnormalities, and developmental as well as phenotypic information about twins were collected. Traditional bisulfite sequencing was used for DNA methylation analysis. Results Microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization revealed a microdeletion 18q12.3-q21.1. in affected twin, residing in a known 18q deletion syndrome region. This syndrome has been associated with growth restriction, developmental delay or intellectual deficiency, and abnormal facial features in previous studies, and thus likely explains the phenotypic discordancy between the twins. We did not observe association between WBCs? DNA methylation profile and PAE, but interestingly, a trend of decreased DNA methylation at the imprinting control region was seen in the twin with prenatal growth retardation at birth. Conclusions The microdeletion emphasizes the importance of adequate chromosomal testing in examining the etiology of complex alcohol-induced developmental disorders. Furthermore, the genotype-specific decreased DNA methylation at the IGF2/H19 locus cannot be considered as a biological mark for PAE in adult WBCs.
  • Hackman, Peter; Udd, Bjarne; Bonnemann, Carsten G.; Ferreiro, Ana; Titinopathy Database Consortium (2017)
  • Clement, Cristina C.; D'Alessandro, Angelo; Thangaswamy, Sangeetha; Chalmers, Samantha; Furtado, Raquel; Spada, Sheila; Mondanelli, Giada; Ianni, Federica; Gehrke, Sarah; Gargaro, Marco; Manni, Giorgia; Lopez Cara, Luisa Carlota; Runge, Peter; Tsai, Wanxia Li; Karaman, Sinem; Arasa, Jorge; Fernandez-Rodriguez, Ruben; Beck, Amanda; Macchiarulo, Antonio; Gadina, Massimo; Halin, Cornelia; Fallarino, Francesca; Skobe, Mihaela; Veldhoen, Marc; Moretti, Simone; Formenti, Silvia; Demaria, Sandra; Soni, Rajesh K.; Galarini, Roberta; Sardella, Roccaldo; Lauvau, Gregoire; Putterman, Chaim; Alitalo, Kari; Grohmann, Ursula; Santambrogio, Laura (2021)
    Tryptophan catabolism is a major metabolic pathway utilized by several professional and non-professional antigen presenting cells to maintain immunological tolerance. Here we report that 3-hydroxy-l-kynurenamine (3-HKA) is a biogenic amine produced via an alternative pathway of tryptophan metabolism. In vitro, 3-HKA has an anti-inflammatory profile by inhibiting the IFN-gamma mediated STAT1/NF-kappa Beta pathway in both mouse and human dendritic cells (DCs) with a consequent decrease in the release of pro-inflammatory chemokines and cytokines, most notably TNF, IL-6, and IL12p70. 3-HKA has protective effects in an experimental mouse model of psoriasis by decreasing skin thickness, erythema, scaling and fissuring, reducing TNF, IL-1 beta, IFN-gamma, and IL-17 production, and inhibiting generation of effector CD8(+) T cells. Similarly, in a mouse model of nephrotoxic nephritis, besides reducing inflammatory cytokines, 3-HKA improves proteinuria and serum urea nitrogen, overall ameliorating immune-mediated glomerulonephritis and renal dysfunction. Overall, we propose that this biogenic amine is a crucial component of tryptophan-mediated immune tolerance. 3-hydroxy-L-kynurenamine (3-HKA) is a metabolite deriving from a lateral pathway of tryptophan catabolism. Here the authors identify 3-HKA as a biogenic amine and show it has anti-inflammatory properties that can protect mice against psoriasis and nephrotoxic nephritis.
  • Khattab, Ayman; Jylha, Kaisa; Hakala, Tomi; Aalto, Mikko; Malima, Robert; Kisinza, William; Honkala, Markku; Nousiainen, Pertti; Meri, Seppo (2017)
    Background: Mosquitoes are vectors for many diseases such as malaria. Insecticide-treated bed nets and indoor residual spraying of insecticides are the principal malaria vector control tools used to prevent malaria in the tropics. Other interventions aim at reducing man-vector contact. For example, house screening provides additive or synergistic effects to other implemented measures. We used commercial screen materials made of polyester, polyethylene or polypropylene to design novel mosquito screens that provide remarkable additional benefits to those commonly used in house screening. The novel design is based on a double screen setup made of a screen with 3D geometric structures parallel to a commercial mosquito screen creating a trap between the two screens. Owing to the design of the 3D screen, mosquitoes can penetrate the 3D screen from one side but cannot return through the other side, making it a unidirectional mosquito screen. Therefore, the mosquitoes are trapped inside the double screen system. The permissiveness of both sides of the 3D screens for mosquitoes to pass through was tested in a wind tunnel using the insectary strain of Anopheles stephensi. Results: Among twenty- five tested 3D screen designs, three designs from the cone, prism, or cylinder design groups were the most efficient in acting as unidirectional mosquito screens. The three cone-,prism-, and cylinder-based screens allowed, on average, 92, 75 and 64% of Anopheles stephensi mosquitoes released into the wind tunnel to penetrate the permissive side and 0, 0 and 6% of mosquitoes to escape through the non-permissive side, respectively. Conclusions: A cone- based 3D screen fulfilled the study objective. It allowed capturing 92% of mosquitoes within the double screen setup inside the wind tunnel and blocked 100% from escaping. Thus, the cone- based screen effectively acted as a unidirectional mosquito screen. This 3D screen-based trap design could therefore be used in house screening as a means of avoiding infective bites and reducing mosquito population size.
  • Gu, Ying; Lee, Hsi-Ming; Napolitano, Nicole; Clemens, McKenzie; Zhang, Yazhou; Sorsa, Timo; Zhang, Yu; Johnson, Francis; Golub, Lorne M. (2013)
  • Buettner, Ralf; Le Xuan Truong Nguyen,; Kumar, Bijender; Morales, Corey; Liu, Chao; Chen, Lisa S.; Pemovska, Tea; Synold, Timothy W.; Palmer, Joycelynne; Thompson, Ryan; Li, Ling; Dinh Hoa Hoang,; Zhang, Bin; Ghoda, Lucy; Kowolik, Claudia; Kontro, Mika; Leitch, Calum; Wennerberg, Krister; Yu, Xiaochun; Chen, Ching-Cheng; Horne, David; Gandhi, Varsha; Pullarkat, Vinod; Marcucci, Guido; Rosen, Steven T. (2019)
    Nucleoside analogs represent the backbone of several distinct chemotherapy regimens for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and combination with tyrosine kinase inhibitors has improved survival of AML patients, including those harboring the poor-risk FLT3-ITD mutation. Although these compounds are effective in killing proliferating blasts, they lack activity against quiescent leukemia stem cells (LSCs), which contributes to initial treatment refractoriness or subsequent disease relapse. The reagent 8-chloro-adenosine (8-Cl-Ado) is a ribose-containing, RNA-directed nucleoside analog that is incorporated into newly transcribed RNA rather than in DNA, causing inhibition of RNA transcription. In this report, we demonstrate antileukemic activities of 8-Cl-Ado in vitro and in vivo and provide mechanistic insight into the mode of action of 8-Cl-Ado in AML. 8-Cl-Ado markedly induced apoptosis in LSC, with negligible effects on normal stem cells. 8-Cl-Ado was particularly effective against AML cell lines and primary AML blast cells harboring the FLT3-ITD mutation. FLT3-ITD is associated with high expression of miR-155. Furthermore, we demonstrate that 8-Cl-Ado inhibits miR-155 expression levels accompanied by induction of DNA-damage and suppression of cell proliferation, through regulation of miR-155/ErbB3 binding protein 1(Ebp1)/p53/PCNA signaling. Finally, we determined that combined treatment of NSG mice engrafted with FLT3-ITD (+) MV4-11 AML cells with 8-Cl-Ado and the FLT3 inhibitor AC220 (quizartinib) synergistically enhanced survival, compared with that of mice treated with the individual drugs, suggesting a potentially effective approach for FLT3-ITD AML patients.
  • Harris, Elizabeth; Töpf, Ana; Vihola, Anna; Evilä, Anni; Barresi, Rita; Hudson, Judith; Hackman, Peter; Herron, Brian; MacArthur, Daniel; Lochmüller, Hanns; Bushby, Kate; Udd, Bjarne; Straub, Volker (2017)
    Mutations in the gene encoding the giant skeletal muscle protein titin are associated with a variety of muscle disorders, including recessive congenital myopathies cardiomyopathy, limb girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) and late onset dominant distal myopathy. Heterozygous truncating mutations have also been linked to dilated cardiomyopathy. The phenotypic spectrum of titinopathies is emerging and expanding, as next generation sequencing techniques make this large gene amenable to sequencing. We undertook whole exome sequencing in four individuals with LGMD. An essential splice site mutation, previously reported in dilated cardiomyopathy, was identified in all families in combination with a second truncating mutation. Affected individuals presented with childhood onset proximal weakness associated with joint contractures and elevated CK. Cardiac dysfunction was present in two individuals. Muscle biopsy showed increased internal nuclei and immunoblotting identified reduction or absence of calpain-3 and demonstrated a marked reduction of C-terminal titin fragments. We confirm the co-occurrence of cardiac and skeletal myopathies associated with recessive truncating titin mutations. Compound heterozygosity of a truncating mutation previously associated with dilated cardiomyopathy and a 'second truncation' in TTN was identified as causative in our skeletal myopathy patients. These findings add to the complexity of interpretation and genetic counselling for titin mutations. (C) 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
  • Ainola, Mari; Tomaszewski, Waclaw; Ostrowska, Barbara; Wesolowska, Ewa; Wagner, H. Daniel; Swieszkowski, Wojciech; Sillat, Tarvo; Peltola, Emilia; Konttinen, Yrjo T. (2016)
    The aim was to develop a hybrid three-dimensional-tissue engineering construct for chondrogenesis. The hypothesis was that they support chondrogenesis. A biodegradable, highly porous polycaprolactone-grate was produced by solid freeform fabrication. The polycaprolactone support was coated with a chitosan/polyethylene oxide nanofibre sheet produced by electrospinning. Transforming growth factor-3-induced chondrogenesis was followed using the following markers: sex determining region Y/-box 9, runt-related transcription factor 2 and collagen II and X in quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, histology and immunostaining. A polycaprolactone-grate and an optimized chitosan/polyethylene oxide nanofibre sheet supported cellular aggregation, chondrogenesis and matrix formation. In tissue engineering constructs, the sheets were seeded first with mesenchymal stem cells and then piled up according to the lasagne principle. The advantages of such a construct are (1) the cells do not need to migrate to the tissue engineering construct and therefore pore size and interconnectivity problems are omitted and (2) the cell-tight nanofibre sheet and collagen-fibre network mimic a cell culture platform for mesenchymal stem cells/chondrocytes (preventing escape) and hinders in-growth of fibroblasts and fibrous scarring (preventing capture). This allows time for the slowly progressing, multiphase true cartilage regeneration.
  • Kluger, Nicolas (2020)
    Abstract The oil canvas ?Punch or May Day? (1829) by British painter Benjamin Robert Haydon (1786-1846) is exhibited at Tate Britain in London [1,2]. The painting theatrically depicts a colorful London-street scene not far from St Marylebone church during May Day a bit after noon. The crowd attends Punch and Judy puppet show in the middle of the street and blocks the coaches? traffic (Figure 1). Among the 25 characters in this painting, a seeming aged-man wearing a creamy white coat and top hat stands out. He has his pocket picked deftly by a small hand while gawping [2].
  • GEMO Study Collaborators; EMBRACE Collaborators; kConFab Investigators; HEBON Investigators; ABCTB Investigators; Coignard, Juliette; Lush, Michael; Beesley, Jonathan; Blomqvist, Carl; Kiiski, Johanna I.; Nevanlinna, Heli (2021)
    Breast cancer (BC) risk for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers varies by genetic and familial factors. About 50 common variants have been shown to modify BC risk for mutation carriers. All but three, were identified in general population studies. Other mutation carrier-specific susceptibility variants may exist but studies of mutation carriers have so far been underpowered. We conduct a novel case-only genome-wide association study comparing genotype frequencies between 60,212 general population BC cases and 13,007 cases with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations. We identify robust novel associations for 2 variants with BC for BRCA1 and 3 for BRCA2 mutation carriers, P
  • Prokopenko, Inga; Poon, Wenny; Maegi, Reedik; Prasad, Rashmi B.; Salehi, S. Albert; Almgren, Peter; Osmark, Peter; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Wierup, Nils; Fall, Tove; Stancakova, Alena; Barker, Adam; Lagou, Vasiliki; Osmond, Clive; Xie, Weijia; Lahti, Jari; Jackson, Anne U.; Cheng, Yu-Ching; Liu, Jie; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Blomstedt, Paul A.; Fadista, Joao; Alkayyali, Sami; Dayeh, Tasnim; Ahlqvist, Emma; Taneera, Jalal; Lecoeur, Cecile; Kumar, Ashish; Hansson, Ola; Hansson, Karin; Voight, Benjamin F.; Kang, Hyun Min; Levy-Marchal, Claire; Vatin, Vincent; Palotie, Aarno; Syvanen, Ann-Christine; Mari, Andrea; Weedon, Michael N.; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Ong, Ken K.; Nilsson, Peter; Isomaa, Bo; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Stumvoll, Michael; Widen, Elisabeth; Lakka, Timo A.; Langenberg, Claudia; Tonjes, Anke; Rauramaa, Rainer; Kuusisto, Johanna; Frayling, Timothy M.; Froguel, Philippe; Walker, Mark; Eriksson, Johan G.; Ling, Charlotte; Kovacs, Peter; Ingelsson, Erik; McCarthy, Mark I.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Silver, Kristi D.; Laakso, Markku; Groop, Leif; Lyssenko, Valeriya (2014)
  • Zhou, Kecheng; Dichlberger, Andrea; Martinez-Seara, Hector; Nyholm, Thomas K. M.; Li, Shiqian; Kim, Young Ah; Vattulainen, Ilpo; Ikonen, Elina; Blom, Tomas (2018)
    Membrane proteins are functionally regulated by the composition of the surrounding lipid bilayer. The late endosomal compartment is a central site for the generation of ceramide, a bioactive sphingolipid, which regulates responses to cell stress. The molecular interactions between ceramide and late endosomal transmembrane proteins are unknown. Here, we uncover in atomistic detail the ceramide interaction of Lysosome Associated Protein Transmembrane 4B (LAPTM4B), implicated in ceramide-dependent cell death and autophagy, and its functional relevance in lysosomal nutrient signaling. The ceramide-mediated regulation of LAPTM4B depends on a sphingolipid interaction motif and an adjacent aspartate residue in the protein's third transmembrane (TM3) helix. The interaction motif provides the preferred contact points for ceramide while the neighboring membrane-embedded acidic residue confers flexibility that is subject to ceramide-induced conformational changes, reducing TM3 bending. This facilitates the interaction between LAPTM4B and the amino acid transporter heavy chain 4F2hc, thereby controlling mTORC signaling. These findings provide mechanistic insights into how transmembrane proteins sense and respond to ceramide.
  • Ahonen, Saija J.; Arumilli, Meharji; Lohi, Hannes (2013)
  • Luukkainen, Annika; Puan, Kia Joo; Yusof, Nurhashikin; Lee, Bernett; Tan, Kai Sen; Liu, Jing; Yan, Yan; Toppila-Salmi, Sanna; Renkonen, Risto; Chow, Vincent T.; Rotzschke, Olaf; Wang, De Yun (2018)
    Background: We established an in vitro co-culture model involving H3N2-infection of human nasal epithelium with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) to investigate their cross-talk during early H3N2 infection. Methods: Nasal epithelium was differentiated from human nasal epithelial stem/progenitor cells and cultured wtih fresh human PBMC. PBMC and supernatants were harvested after 24 and 48 h of co-culture with H3N2-infected nasal epithelium. We used flow cytometry and Luminex to characterize PBMC subpopulations, their activation and secretion of cytokine and chemokines. Results: H3N2 infection of the nasal epithelium associated with significant increase in interferons (IFN-alpha, IFN-gamma, IL-29), pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-alpha, BDNF, IL-3) and viral-associated chemokines (IP-10, MCP-3, I-TAC, MIG), detectable already after 24 h. This translates into rapid activation of monocytes, NK-cells and innate T-cells (MAIT and gamma delta T cells), evident with CD38+ and/or CD69+ upregulation. Conclusions: This system may contribute to in vitro mechanistic immunological studies bridging systemic models and possibly enable the development of targeted immunomodulatory therapies.