Browsing by Subject "A-BETA"

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  • Ni, Ruiqing; Gillberg, Per-Goran; Bogdanovic, Nenad; Viitanen, Matti; Myllykangas, Liisa; Nennesmo, Inger; Langstrom, Bengt; Nordberg, Agneta (2017)
    Introduction: Amyloid imaging has been integrated into diagnostic criteria for Alzheimer's disease (AD). How amyloid tracers binding differ for different tracer structures and amyloid-beta aggregates in autosomal dominant AD (ADAD) and sporadic AD is unclear. Methods: Binding properties of different amyloid tracers were examined in brain homogenates from six ADAD with APPswe, PS1 M146V, and PS1 E Delta 9 mutations, 13 sporadic AD, and 14 control cases. Results: H-3-PIB, H-3-florbetaben, H-3-AZD2184, and BTA-1 shared a high-and a varying low-affinity binding site in the frontal cortex of sporadic AD. AZD2184 detected another binding site (affinity 33 nM) in the frontal cortex of ADAD. The H-3-AZD2184 and H-3-PIB binding were significantly higher in the striatum of ADAD compared to sporadic AD and control. Polyphenol resveratrol showed strongest inhibition on H-3-AZD84 binding followed by H-3-florbetaben and minimal on H-3-PIB. Discussion: This study implies amyloid tracers of different structures detect different sites on amyloid-beta fibrils or conformations. (C) 2016 the Alzheimer's Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Relander, Kristiina; Hietanen, Marja; Nuotio, Krista; Ijäs, Petra; Tikkala, Irene; Saimanen, Eija; Lindsberg, Perttu J.; Soinne, Lauri (2021)
    Background: Carotid endarterectomy (CEA) has been associated with both postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) and improvement (POCI). However, the prognostic significance of postoperative cognitive changes related to CEA is largely unknown. The aim of this study was to examine the associations between postoperative cognitive changes after CEA and long-term survival. Methods: We studied 43 patients 1 day before CEA as well as 4 days and 3 months after surgery with an extensive neuropsychological test array, and followed them for up to 14 years. POCD and POCI relative to baseline were determined with the reliable change index derived from 17 healthy controls. Associations between POCD/POCI and mortality within the patient group were studied with Cox regression analyses adjusted for confounders. Results: POCD in any functional domain was evident in 28% of patients 4 days after surgery and in 33% of patients 3 months after surgery. POCI was shown in 23% of patients at 4 days and in 44% of patients at 3 months. POCD at 3 months was associated with higher long-term mortality (hazard ratio 5.0, 95% CI 1.8-13.9, p = 0.002) compared with patients with no cognitive decline. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that POCD in a stable phase, 3 months after CEA predicts premature death. Evaluation of postoperative cognitive changes is essential, and POCD in a stable phase after CEA should prompt scrutiny of underlying factors and better adherence to therapies to prevent recurrences and to promote early intervention in imminent deterioration.
  • Patel, Tirth K.; Habimana-Griffin, LeMoyne; Gao, Xuefeng; Xu, Baogang; Achilefu, Samuel; Alitalo, Kari; McKee, Celia A.; Sheehan, Patrick W.; Musiek, Erik S.; Xiong, Chengjie; Coble, Dean; Holtzman, David M. (2019)
    BackgroundAlzheimer's disease is characterized by two main neuropathological hallmarks: extracellular plaques of amyloid- (A) protein and intracellular aggregates of tau protein. Although tau is normally a soluble monomer that bind microtubules, in disease it forms insoluble, hyperphosphorylated aggregates in the cell body. Aside from its role in AD, tau is also involved in several other neurodegenerative disorders collectively called tauopathies, such as progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), corticobasal degeneration (CBD), some forms of frontotemporal dementia, and argyrophilic grain disease (AGD). The prion hypothesis suggests that after an initial trigger event, misfolded forms of tau are released into the extracellular space, where they spread through different brain regions, enter cells, and seeding previously normal forms. Thus understanding mechanisms regulating the clearance of extracellular tau from the CNS is important. The discovery of a true lymphatic system in the dura and its potential role in mediating A pathology prompted us to investigate its role in regulating extracellular tau clearance.MethodsTo study clearance of extracellular tau from the brain, we conjugated monomeric human tau with a near-infrared dye cypate, and injected this labeled tau in the parenchyma of both wild-type and K14-VEGFR3-Ig transgenic mice, which lack a functional CNS lymphatic system. Following injection we performed longitudinal imaging using fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) and quantified fluorescence to calculate clearance of tau from the brain. To complement this, we also measured tau clearance to the periphery by measuring plasma tau in both groups of mice.ResultsOur results show that a significantly higher amount of tau is retained in the brains of K14-VEGFR3-Ig vs. wild type mice at 48 and 72h post-injection and its subsequent clearance to the periphery is delayed. We found that clearance of reference tracer human serum albumin (HSA) was also significantly delayed in the K14-VEGFR3-Ig mice.ConclusionsThe dural lymphatic system appears to play an important role in clearance of extracellular tau, since tau clearance is impaired in the absence of functional lymphatics. Based on our baseline characterization of extracellular tau clearance, future studies are warranted to look at the interaction between tau pathology and efficiency of lymphatic function.
  • Elieh Ali Komi, Daniel; Shafaghat, Farzaneh; Kovanen, Petri T.; Meri, Seppo (2020)
    Abstract The emergence and evolution of the complement system and mast cells (MCs) can be traced back to sea urchins and the ascidian Styela plicata, respectively. Acting as a cascade of enzymatic reactions, complement is activated through the classical (CP), the alternative (AP), and the lectin pathway (LP) based on the recognized molecules. The system's main biological functions include lysis, opsonization, and recruitment of phagocytes. MCs, beyond their classic role as master cells of allergic reactions, play a role in other settings, as well. Thus, MCs are considered as extrahepatic producers of complement proteins. They express various complement receptors, including those for C3a and C5a. C3a and C5a not only activate the C3aR and C5aR expressing MCs but also act as chemoattractants for MCs derived from different anatomic sites, such as from the bone marrow, human umbilical cord blood, or skin in vitro. Cross talk between MCs and complement is facilitated by the production of complement proteins by MCs and their activation by the MC tryptase. The coordinated activity between MCs and the complement system plays a key role, for example, in a number of allergic, cutaneous, and vascular diseases. At a molecular level, MCs and complement system interactions are based on the production of several complement zymogens by MCs and their activation by MC-released proteases. Additionally, at a cellular level, MCs act as potent effector cells of complement activation by expressing receptors for C3a and C5a through which their chemoattraction and activation are mediated by anaphylatoxins in a paracrine and autocrine fashion.
  • Merezhko, Maria; Muggalla, Pranuthi; Nykanen, Niko-Petteri; Yan, Xu; Sakha, Prasanna; Huttunen, Henri J. (2014)
  • Owen, Michael C.; Kulig, Waldemar; Poojari, Chetan; Rog, Tomasz; Strodel, Birgit (2018)
    To resolve the contribution of ceramide-containing lipids to the aggregation of the amyloid-β protein into β-sheet rich toxic oligomers, we employed molecular dynamics simulations to study the effect of cholesterol-containing bilayers comprised of POPC (70% POPC, and 30% cholesterol) and physiologically relevant concentrations of sphingomyelin (SM) (30% SM, 40% POPC, and 30% cholesterol), and the GM1 ganglioside (5% GM1, 70% POPC, and 25% cholesterol). The increased bilayer rigidity provided by SM (and to a lesser degree, GM1) reduced the interactions between the SM-enriched bilayer and the N-terminus of Aβ42 (and also residues Ser26, Asn27, and Lys28), which facilitated the formation of a β-sheet in the normally disordered N-terminal region. Aβ42 remained anchored to the SM-enriched bilayer through hydrogen bonds with the side chain of Arg5. With β-sheets in the at the N and C termini, the structure of Aβ42 in the sphingomyelin-enriched bilayer most resembles β-sheet-rich structures found in higher-ordered Aβ fibrils. Conversely, when bound to a bilayer comprised of 5% GM1, the conformation remained similar to that observed in the absence of GM1, with Aβ42 only making contact with one or two GM1 molecules. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Protein Aggregation and Misfolding at the Cell Membrane Interface edited by Ayyalusamy Ramamoorthy.
  • Sweeney, Patrick; Park, Hyunsun; Baumann, Marc; Dunlop, John; Frydman, Judith; Kopito, Ron; McCampbell, Alexander; Leblanc, Gabrielle; Venkateswaran, Anjli; Nurmi, Antti; Hodgson, Robert (2017)
    A hallmark of neurodegenerative proteinopathies is the formation of misfolded protein aggregates that cause cellular toxicity and contribute to cellular proteostatic collapse. Therapeutic options are currently being explored that target different steps in the production and processing of proteins implicated in neurodegenerative disease, including synthesis, chaperone-assisted folding and trafficking, and degradation via the proteasome and autophagy pathways. Other therapies, like mTOR inhibitors and activators of the heat shock response, can rebalance the entire proteostatic network. However, there are major challenges that impact the development of novel therapies, including incomplete knowledge of druggable disease targets and their mechanism of action as well as a lack of biomarkers to monitor disease progression and therapeutic response. A notable development is the creation of collaborative ecosystems that include patients, clinicians, basic and translational researchers, foundations and regulatory agencies to promote scientific rigor and clinical data to accelerate the development of therapies that prevent, reverse or delay the progression of neurodegenerative proteinopathies.