Browsing by Subject "ABSCISIC-ACID"

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  • Kaurilind, Eve; Xu, Enjun; Brosche, Mikael (2015)
    Background: To survive in a changing environment plants constantly monitor their surroundings. In response to several stresses and during photorespiration plants use reactive oxygen species as signaling molecules. The Arabidopsis thaliana catalase2 (cat2) mutant lacks a peroxisomal catalase and under photorespiratory conditions accumulates H2O2, which leads to activation of cell death. Methods: A cat2 double mutant collection was generated through crossing and scored for cell death in different assays. Selected double mutants were further analyzed for photosynthetic performance and H2O2 accumulation. Results: We used a targeted mutant analysis with more than 50 cat2 double mutants to investigate the role of stress hormones and other defense regulators in H2O2 -mediated cell death. Several transcription factors (AS1, MYB30, MYC2, WRKY70), cell death regulators (RCD1, DND1) and hormone regulators (AXR1, ERA1, SID2, EDS1, SGT1b) were essential for execution of cell death in cat2. Genetic loci required for cell death in cat2 was compared with regulators of cell death in spontaneous lesion mimic mutants and led to the identification of a core set of plant cell death regulators. Analysis of gene expression data from cat2 and plants undergoing cell death revealed similar gene expression profiles, further supporting the existence of a common program for regulation of plant cell death. Conclusions: Our results provide a genetic framework for further study on the role of H2O2 in regulation of cell death. The hormones salicylic acid, jasmonic acid and auxin, as well as their interaction, are crucial determinants of cell death regulation.
  • Whitaker, Vance M.; Knapp, Steven J.; Hardigan, Michael A.; Edger, Patrick P.; Slovin, Janet P.; Bassil, Nahla V.; Hytönen, Timo; Mackenzie, Kathryn K.; Lee, Seonghee; Jung, Sook; Main, Dorrie; Barbey, Christopher R.; Verma, Sujeet (2020)
    The cultivated strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) is an allo-octoploid species, originating nearly 300 years ago from wild progenitors from the Americas. Since that time the strawberry has become the most widely cultivated fruit crop in the world, universally appealing due to its sensory qualities and health benefits. The recent publication of the first high-quality chromosome-scale octoploid strawberry genome (cv. Camarosa) is enabling rapid advances in genetics, stimulating scientific debate and provoking new research questions. In this forward-looking review we propose avenues of research toward new biological insights and applications to agriculture. Among these are the origins of the genome, characterization of genetic variants, and big data approaches to breeding. Key areas of research in molecular biology will include the control of flowering, fruit development, fruit quality, and plant–pathogen interactions. In order to realize this potential as a global community, investments in genome resources must be continually augmented.
  • Castillejo, Cristina; Waurich, Veronika; Wagner, Henning; Ramos, Ruben; Oiza, Nicolas; Munoz, Pilar; Trivino, Juan C.; Caruana, Julie; Liu, Zhongchi; Cobo, Nicolas; Hardigan, Michael A.; Knapp, Steven J.; Vallarino, Jose G.; Osorio, Sonia; Martin-Pizarro, Carmen; Pose, David; Toivainen, Tuomas; Hytonen, Timo; Oh, Youngjae; Barbey, Christopher R.; Whitaker, Vance M.; Lee, Seonghee; Olbricht, Klaus; Sanchez-Sevilla, Jose F.; Amaya, Iraida (2020)
    Independent mutations in the transcription factor MYB10 cause most of the anthocyanin variation observed in diploid woodland strawberry (Fragaria vesca) and octoploid cultivated strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa). The fruits of diploid and octoploid strawberry (Fragaria spp) show substantial natural variation in color due to distinct anthocyanin accumulation and distribution patterns. Anthocyanin biosynthesis is controlled by a clade of R2R3 MYB transcription factors, among which MYB10 is the main activator in strawberry fruit. Here, we show that mutations in MYB10 cause most of the variation in anthocyanin accumulation and distribution observed in diploid woodland strawberry (F. vesca) and octoploid cultivated strawberry (F. xananassa). Using a mapping-by-sequencing approach, we identified a gypsy-transposon in MYB10 that truncates the protein and knocks out anthocyanin biosynthesis in a white-fruited F. vesca ecotype. Two additional loss-of-function mutations in MYB10 were identified among geographically diverse white-fruited F. vesca ecotypes. Genetic and transcriptomic analyses of octoploid Fragaria spp revealed that FaMYB10-2, one of three MYB10 homoeologs identified, regulates anthocyanin biosynthesis in developing fruit. Furthermore, independent mutations in MYB10-2 are the underlying cause of natural variation in fruit skin and flesh color in octoploid strawberry. We identified a CACTA-like transposon (FaEnSpm-2) insertion in the MYB10-2 promoter of red-fleshed accessions that was associated with enhanced expression. Our findings suggest that cis-regulatory elements in FaEnSpm-2 are responsible for enhanced MYB10-2 expression and anthocyanin biosynthesis in strawberry fruit flesh.
  • Calleja-Rodriguez, Ainhoa; Li, Zitong; Hallingbäck, Henrik R.; Sillanpää, Mikko J.; Wu, Harry X.; Abrahamsson, Sara; Garcia-Gil, Maria Rosario (2019)
    In forest tree breeding, family-based Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) studies are valuable as methods to dissect the complexity of a trait and as a source of candidate genes. In the field of conifer research, our study contributes to the evaluation of phenotypic and predicted breeding values for the identification of QTL linked to complex traits in a three-generation pedigree population in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.). A total of 11 470 open pollinated F-2-progeny trees established at three different locations, were measured for growth and adaptive traits. Breeding values were predicted for their 360 mothers, originating from a single cross of two grand-parents. A multilevel LASSO association analysis was conducted to detect QTL using genotypes of the mothers with the corresponding phenotypes and Estimated Breeding Values (EBV). Different levels of genotype-by-environment (G x E) effects among sites at different years, were detected for survival and height. Moderate-to-low narrow sense heritabilities and EBV accuracies were found for all traits and all sites. We identified 18 AFLPs and 12 SNPs to be associated with QTL for one or more traits. 62 QTL were significant with percentages of variance explained ranging from 1.7 to 18.9%. In those cases where the same marker was associated to a phenotypic or an ebvQTL, the ebvQTL always explained higher proportion of the variance, maybe due to the more accurate nature of Estimated Breeding Values (EBV). Two SNP-QTL showed pleiotropic effects for traits related with hardiness, seed, cone and flower production. Furthermore, we detected several QTL with significant effects across multiple ages, which could be considered as strong candidate loci for early selection. The lack of reproducibility of some QTL detected across sites may be due to environmental heterogeneity reflected by the genotype- and QTL-by-environment effects. (C) 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license.
  • Ayvaz, Muavviz; Guven, Avni; Fagerstedt, Kurt Valter (2015)
    Potato crop production in Turkey ranks on the thirteenth place in the world. Toxicity is a problematic issue for some parts of the Turkish soils. Hence, it is very important to clarify the physiological responses of plants to toxic mineral stress. In this study, two different potato cultivars - Solanum tuberosum cv. Resy and Solanum tuberosum cv. Agria - were used as a study material. Excess boron was applied in two different concentrations (5 mmol/L and 12.5 mmol/L) 32 days after planting the tubers. Plants were harvested at the end of 15 days of excess boron application. Chlorophyll fluorescence (Fv/Fm) was measured. Shoot height and shoot-root fresh weight contents were determined. Analyses were carried out for the contents of the endogenous hormones indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and abscisic acid (ABA) by using gas chromatography-mass spectrophotometry (GS-MS). According to the obtained data, plants' shoot height did not change, whereas the shoot's fresh weight decreased significantly with increasing of the boron concentrations in cv Resy, by applying 12.5 mmol/L boron. With 12.5 mmol/L boron, the photosynthesis was negatively affected in both cultivars. Boron application led to increased endogenous IAA and ABA content in both cultivars. As a result, cv. Resy showed more resistance to excess boron. Findings on the hormone metabolism and chlorophyll fluorescence in different cultivars will shed a light on understanding the physiological response to excess mineral stress.
  • Kovalchuk, Andriy; Zeng, Zhen; Ghimire, Rajendra P.; Kivimäenpää, Minna; Raffaello, Tommaso; Liu, Mengxia; Mukrimin, Mukrimin; Kasanen, Risto Aarne Olavi; Sun, Hui; Julkunen-Tiitto, Riitta; Holopainen, Jarmo K.; Asiegbu, Frederick Obioma (2019)
    BackgroundRoot and butt rot of conifer trees caused by fungi belonging to the Heterobasidion annosum species complex is one of the most economically important fungal diseases in commercial conifer plantations throughout the Northern hemisphere. We investigated the interactions between Heterobasidion fungi and their host by conducting dual RNA-seq and chemical analysis on Norway spruce trees naturally infected by Heterobasidion spp. We analyzed host and pathogen transcriptome and phenolic and terpenoid contents of the spruce trees.ResultsPresented results emphasize the role of the phenylpropanoid and flavonoid pathways in the chemical defense of Norway spruce trees. Accumulation of lignans was observed in trees displaying symptoms of wood decay. A number of candidate genes with a predicted role in the higher level regulation of spruce defense responses were identified. Our data indicate a possible role of abscisic acid (ABA) signaling in the spruce defense against Heterobasidion infection. Fungal transcripts corresponding to genes encoding carbohydrate- and lignin-degrading enzymes, secondary metabolism genes and effector-like genes were expressed during the host colonization.ConclusionsOur results provide additional insight into defense strategies employed by Norway spruce trees against Heterobasidion infection. The potential applications of the identified candidate genes as markers for higher resistance against root and butt rot deserve further evaluation.
  • Wang, Jinhui; Haapalainen, Minna; Nissinen, Anne I.; Pirhonen, Minna (2021)
    The interactions between the phloem-limited pathogen 'Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum' haplotype C and carrot (Daucus carota subsp. sativus) were studied at 4, 5, and 9 weeks postinoculation (wpi), by combining dual RNA-Seq results with data on bacterial colonization and observations of the plant phenotype. In the infected plants, genes involved in jasmonate biosynthesis, salicylate signaling, pathogen-associated molecular pattern- and effector-triggered immunity, and production of pathogenesis-related proteins were up-regulated. At 4 wpi, terpenoid synthesis-related genes were up-regulated, presumably as a response to the psyllid feeding, whereas at 5 and 9 wpi, genes involved in both the terpenoid and flavonoid production were down-regulated and phenylpropanoid genes were up-regulated. Chloroplast-related gene expression was down-regulated, in concordance with the observed yellowing of the infected plant leaves. Both the RNA-Seq data and electron microscopy suggested callose accumulation in the infected phloem vessels, likely to impair the transport of photosynthates, while phloem regeneration was suggested by the formation of new sieve cells and the upregulation of cell wall-related gene expression. The 'Ca. L. solanacearum' genes involved in replication, transcription, and translation were expressed at high levels at 4 and 5 wpi, whereas, at 9 wpi, the Flp pilus genes were highly expressed, suggesting adherence and reducedmobility of the bacteria. The 'Ca. L. solanacearum' genes encoding ATP and C4-dicarboxylate uptake were differentially expressed between the early and late infection stages, suggesting a change in the dependence on different host-derived energy sources. HPE1 effector and salicylate hydroxylasewere expressed, presumably to suppress host cell death and salicylic acid-dependent defenses during the infection.
  • Johansson, Karin S. L.; El-Soda, Mohamed; Pagel, Ellen; Meyer, Rhonda C.; Toldsepp, Kadri; Nilsson, Anders K.; Brosche, Mikael; Kollist, Hannes; Uddling, Johan; Andersson, Mats X. (2020)
    Background and Aims The stomatal conductance (g(s)) of most plant species decreases in response to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration. This response could have a significant impact on plant water use in a future climate. However, the regulation of the CO2 induced stomatal closure response is not fully understood. Moreover, the potential genetic links between short-term (within minutes to hours) and long-term (within weeks to months) responses of g(s) to increased atmospheric CO2 have not been explored. Methods We used Arabidopsis thaliana recombinant inbred lines originating from accessions Col-0 (strong CO2 response) and C24 (weak CO2 response) to study short- and long-term controls of g(s) Quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping was used to identify loci controlling short- and long-term g(s) responses to elevated CO2 as well as other stomata-related traits. Key Results Short- and long-term stomatal responses to elevated CO2 were significantly correlated. Both short-and long-term responses were associated with a QTL, at the end of chromosome 2. The location of this QTL was confirmed using near-isogonic lines and it was fine-mapped to a 410-kb region. The QTL did not correspond to any known gene involved in stomatal closure and had no effect on the responsiveness to abscisic acid. Additionally, we identified numerous other loci associated with stomatal regulation. Conclusions We identified and confirmed the effect of a strong QTL corresponding to a yet unknown regulator of stomatal closure in response to elevated CO2 concentration. The correlation between short- and long-term stomatal CO2 responses and the genetic link between these traits highlight the importance of understanding guard cell CO2 signalling to predict and manipulate plant water use in a world with increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration. This study demonstrates the power of using natural variation to unravel the genetic regulation of complex traits.
  • Pavicic, M.; Wang, F.; Mouhu, K.; Himanen, K. (2019)
    Seed quality is an important factor for seedling vigour as well as adult plant resilience. The key quality attributes are related to physical characteristics, physiological performance, genetic background and health status of the seeds. Many ways to address seed quality attributes have been developed and recently many of them have featured automated high throughput methods. In our study, we addressed two of the seed quality attributes, namely physiological performance and genetic background by analysing germination rates in our mutant collection. These mutants represent ubiquitin E3 ligases that transcriptionally respond to abscisic acid (ABA). This plant hormone is an important regulator of germination and seedling establishment. To facilitate in vitro germination screens of large seed collections a high throughput image-based assay was developed. As a read out of the germination on ABA treatment the cotyledon emergence was detected with top view chlorophyll fluorescence camera. By applying the ABA treatment during germination, RING-type ubiquitin E3 ligase mutants were identified, showing either resistant or sensitive responses to ABA. In conclusion, a scalable high throughput screen for in vitro germination assay was established that allowed fast screening of tens of mutants in a hormone supplemented media.
  • Overmyer, Kirk Loren; Vuorinen, Katariina Elina; Brosche, Mikael Johan (2018)
    Plants live in a world where they are challenged by abiotic and biotic stresses. In response to unfavorable conditions or an acute challenge like a pathogen attack, plants use various signaling pathways that regulate expression of defense genes and other mechanisms to provide resistance or stress adaptation. Identification of the regulatory steps in defense signaling has seen much progress in recent years. Many of the identified signaling pathways show interactions with each other, exemplified by the modulation of the jasmonic acid response by salicylic acid. Accordingly, defense regulation is more appropriately thought of as a web of interactions, rather than linear pathways. Here we describe various regulatory components and how they interact to provide an appropriate defense response. One of the common assays to monitor the output of defense signaling, as well as interaction between signaling pathways, is the measurement of altered gene expression. We illustrate that, while this is a suitable assay to monitor defense regulation, it can also inadvertently provide overstated conclusions about interaction among signaling pathways.
  • Chen, Fugui; Shen, Juan; Min, Dou; Ke, Lixia; Tian, Xin; Korpelainen, Helena; Li, Chunyang (2018)
    High Mn poisoned male and female Populus cathayana. The toxicity could be alleviated by exogenous ABA application. Intriguingly, ABA granted higher resistance to males than to females under high Mn stress because ABA could induce more blocking of Mn translocation to leaf in males than in females. Abscisic acid (ABA) is involved in plants' adaptive responses to various environmental stresses. However, little is known about the sex-related detoxification of ABA in plants under excess manganese (Mn) conditions. To reveal potentially different ABA detoxification mechanisms between Populus cathayana males and females against excess Mn exposure, photosynthesis performance, Mn2+ concentrations and morphologic changes were investigated. High Mn stress led to a more severe chloroplast destruction and, thus, greater reduction in the photosynthesis of P. cathayana females when compared to males. Under high Mn conditions, Mn reallocated mainly to leaves in females, while in males, it was distributed equally to roots and leaves. With the application of ABA, photosynthesis was restored more in males and more integrated grana in males than in females. It should be noted that Mn concentrations in males were lower in leaves and higher in roots and stems than those in females when treated with the combination of Mn and ABA. Conclusively, due to the reduction of root-shoot Mn transportation induced by ABA in P. cathayana males, males experienced less physiological injuries than do females, which suggest that males possess greater ABA-inducible resistance to Mn stress than do females.
  • Survila, Mantas; Davidsson, Pär R.; Pennanen, Ville; Kariola, Tarja; Broberg, Martin; Sipari, Nina; Heino, Pekka; Palva, Erkki T. (2016)
    Cuticular defects trigger a battery of reactions including enhanced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and resistance to necrotrophic pathogens. However, the source of ROS generated by such impaired cuticles has remained elusive. Here, we report the characterization of Arabidopsis thaliana ohyl mutant, a Peroxidase 57 (PER57) - overexpressing line that demonstrates enhanced defense responses that result both from increased accumulation of ROS and permeability of the leaf cuticle. The ohyl mutant was identified in a screen of A. thaliana seedlings for oligogalacturonides (OGs) insensitive/hypersensitive mutants that exhibit altered growth retardation in response to exogenous OGs. Mutants impaired in OG sensitivity were analyzed for disease resistance/susceptibility to the necrotrophic phytopathogens Botrytis cinerea and Pectobacterium carotovorum. In the ohyl line, the hypersensitivity to OGs was associated with resistance to the tested pathogens. This PER57 overexpressing line exhibited a significantly more permeable leaf cuticle than wild-type plants and this phenotype could be recapitulated by overexpressing other class III peroxidases. Such peroxidase overexpression was accompanied by the suppressed expression of cutin biosynthesis genes and the enhanced expression of genes associated with OG-signaling. Application of ABA completely removed ROS, restored the expression of genes associated with cuticle biosynthesis and led to decreased permeability of the leaf cuticle, and finally, abolished immunity to B. cinerea. Our work demonstrates that increased peroxidase activity increases permeability of the leaf cuticle. The loss of cuticle integrity primes plant defenses to necrotrophic pathogens via the activation of DAMP-responses.
  • Nuhkat, Maris; Brosché, Mikael; Stoelzle-Feix, Sonja; Dietrich, Petra; Hedrich, Rainer; Roelfsema, M.Rob G.; Kollist, Hannes (2021)
    Plant stress signalling involves bursts of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which can be mimicked by the application of acute pulses of ozone. Such ozone-pulses inhibit photosynthesis and trigger stomatal closure in a few minutes, but the signalling that underlies these responses remains largely unknown. We measured changes in Arabidopsis thaliana gas exchange after treatment with acute pulses of ozone and set up a system for simultaneous measurement of membrane potential and cytosolic calcium with the fluorescent reporter R-GECO1. We show that within 1 min, prior to stomatal closure, O3 triggered a drop in whole-plant CO2 uptake. Within this early phase, O3 pulses (200–1000 ppb) elicited simultaneous membrane depolarization and cytosolic calcium increase, whereas these pulses had no long-term effect on either stomatal conductance or photosynthesis. In contrast, pulses of 5000 ppb O3 induced cell death, systemic Ca2+ signals and an irreversible drop in stomatal conductance and photosynthetic capacity. We conclude that mesophyll cells respond to ozone in a few seconds by distinct pattern of plasma membrane depolarizations accompanied by an increase in the cytosolic calcium ion (Ca2+) level. These responses became systemic only at very high ozone concentrations. Thus, plants have rapid mechanism to sense and discriminate the strength of ozone signals. © 2021 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2021 New Phytologist Foundation
  • Ehonen, Sanna; Yarmolinsky, Dmitry; Kollist, Hannes; Kangasjärvi, Jaakko (2019)
    Significance: Stomata sense the intercellular carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration (C-i) and water availability under changing environmental conditions and adjust their apertures to maintain optimal cellular conditions for photosynthesis. Stomatal movements are regulated by a complex network of signaling cascades where reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a key role as signaling molecules. Recent Advances: Recent research has uncovered several new signaling components involved in CO2- and abscisic acid-triggered guard cell signaling pathways. In addition, we are beginning to understand the complex interactions between different signaling pathways. Critical Issues: Plants close their stomata in reaction to stress conditions, such as drought, and the subsequent decrease in C-i leads to ROS production through photorespiration and over-reduction of the chloroplast electron transport chain. This reduces plant growth and thus drought may cause severe yield losses for agriculture especially in arid areas. Future Directions: The focus of future research should be drawn toward understanding the interplay between various signaling pathways and how ROS, redox, and hormonal balance changes in space and time. Translating this knowledge from model species to crop plants will help in the development of new drought-resistant crop species with high yields. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 00, 000-000.