Browsing by Subject "ACUTE MYELOGENOUS LEUKEMIA"

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  • Poire, Xavier; Labopin, Myriam; Polge, Emmanuelle; Passweg, Jakob; Craddock, Charles; Blaise, Didier; Cornelissen, Jan J.; Volin, Liisa; Russell, Nigel H.; Socie, Gerard; Michallet, Mauricette; Fegueux, Nathalie; Chevallier, Patrice; Brecht, Arne; Hunault-Berger, Mathilde; Mohty, Mohamad; Esteve, Jordi; Nagler, Arnon (2018)
    Intermediate-risk cytogenetic acute myeloid leukemia with an internal tandem duplication of FLT3 (FLT3-ITD) is associated with a high risk of relapse, and is now a standard indication for allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Nevertheless, most studies supporting this strategy have been performed in young patients. To address the benefit of allogeneic transplantation in the elderly, we made a selection from the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation registry of de novo intermediate-risk cytogenetic acute myeloid leukemia harboring FLT3-ITD in patients aged 60 or over and transplanted from a related or unrelated donor between January 2000 and December 2015. Two hundred and ninety-one patients were identified. Most patients received a reduced-intensity conditioning (82%), while donors consisted of an unrelated donor in 161 (55%) patients. Two hundred and twelve patients received their transplantation in first remission, 37 in second remission and 42 in a more advanced stage of the disease. The 2-year leukemia-free survival rate was 56% in patients in first remission, 22% in those in second remission and 10% in patients with active disease, respectively (P= 60 with FLT3-ITD acute myeloid leukemia in first remission, similarly to current treatment recommendations for younger patients.
  • Impola, Ulla; Turpeinen, Hannu; Alakulppi, Noora; Linjama, Tiina; Volin, Liisa; Niittyvuopio, Riitta; Partanen, Jukka; Koskela, Satu (2014)
    Successful allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) depends not only on good HLA match but also on T-cell mediated graft-versus-leukemia (GyL) effect. Natural killer (NK) cells are able to kill malignant cells by receiving activation signal from the killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) recognizing HLA molecules on a cancer cell. It has been recently reported that the risk of relapse in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is reduced in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients whose donors have several activating KIR genes or KIR B-motifs in unrelated donor setting, obviously due to enhanced GyL effect by NK cells. We studied the effect on relapse rate of donor KIR haplotypes in the HLA-identical adult sibling HSCT, done in a single center, in Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland. Altogether, 134 patients with 6 different diagnoses were identified. Their donors were KIR genotyped using the Luminex and the SSP techniques. The clinical endpoint, that is, occurrence of relapse, was compared with the presence or absence of single KIR genes. Also, time from transplantation to relapse was analyzed. The patients with AML whose donors have KIR2DL2 or KIR2DS2 had statistically significantly longer relapse-free survival (P = 0.015). Our data support previous reports that donors with KIR B-haplotype defining genes have a lower occurrence of relapse in HSCT of AML patients. Determination of donor KIR haplotypes could be a useful addition for a risk assessment of HSCT especially in AML patients.
  • Malard, Florent; Labopin, Myriam; Cho, Christina; Blaise, Didier; Papadopoulos, Esperanza B.; Passweg, Jakob; O'Reilly, Richard; Forcade, Edouard; Maloy, Molly; Volin, Liisa; Castro-Malaspina, Hugo; Hicheri, Yosr; Jakubowski, Ann A.; Orvain, Corentin; Giralt, Sergio; Mohty, Mohamad; Nagler, Arnon; Perales, Miguel-Angel (2018)
    BackgroundGraft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is one of the leading causes of non-relapse mortality and morbidity after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HCT).MethodsWe evaluated the outcomes of two well-established strategies used for GVHD prevention: in vivo T cell depletion using antithymocyte globulin (ATG) and ex vivo T cell depletion using a CD34-selected (CD34+) graft. A total of 525 adult patients (363 ATG, 162 CD34+) with intermediate or high-risk cytogenetics acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in first complete remission (CR1) were included. Patients underwent myeloablative allo-HCT using matched related or unrelated donors.ResultsTwo-year overall survival estimate was 69.9% (95% CI, 58.5-69.4) in the ATG group and 67.6% (95% CI, 60.3-74.9) in the CD34+ group (p=0.31). The cumulative incidence of grade II-IV acute GVHD and chronic GVHD was higher in the ATG cohort [HR 2.0 (95% CI 1.1-3.7), p=0.02; HR 15.1 (95% CI 5.3-42.2), p
  • Canaani, Jonathan; Labopin, Myriam; Socie, Gerard; Nihtinen, Anne; Huynh, Anne; Cornelissen, Jan; Deconinck, Eric; Gedde-Dahl, Tobias; Forcade, Edouard; Chevallier, Patrice; Bourhis, Jean H.; Blaise, Didier; Mohty, Mohamad; Nagler, Arnon (2017)
    Up to 20% of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients present initially with hyperleukocytosis, placing them at increased risk for early mortality during induction. Yet, it is unknown whether hyperleukocytosis still retains prognostic value for AML patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Furthermore, it is unknown whether hyperleukocytosis holds prognostic significance when modern molecular markers such as FLT3-ITD and NPM1 are accounted for. To determine whether hyperleukocytosis is an independent prognostic factor influencing outcome in transplanted AML patients we performed a retrospective analysis using the registry of the acute leukemia working party of the European Society of Blood and Marrow Transplantation. A cohort of 357 patients with hyperleukocytosis (159 patients with white blood count [WBC] 50 K-100 K, 198 patients with WBC >= 100 K) was compared to 918 patients without hyperleukocytosis. Patients with hyperleukocytosis were younger, had an increased rate of favorable risk cytogenetics, and more likely to be FLT3 and NPM1 mutated. In multivariate analysis, hyperleukocytosis was independently associated with increased relapse incidence (hazard ratio [HR] of 1.55, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.14-2.12; P = .004), decreased leukemia-free survival (HR of 1.38, 95% CI, 1.07-1.78; P = .013), and inferior overall survival (HR of 1.4, 95% CI, 1.07-1.84; P = .013). Hyperleukocytosis retains a significant prognostic role for AML patients undergoing HSCT.
  • Saraceni, Francesco; Labopin, Myriam; Gorin, Norbert-Claude; Blaise, Didier; Tabrizi, Reza; Volin, Liisa; Cornelissen, Jan; Cahn, Jean-Yves; Chevallier, Patrice; Craddock, Charles; Wu, Depei; Huynh, Anne; Arcese, William; Mohty, Mohamad; Nagler, Arnon (2016)
    Background: Optimal post-remission strategy for patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is matter of intense debate. Recent reports have shown stronger anti-leukemic activity but similar survival for allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) from matched sibling donor compared to autologous transplantation (auto-HSCT); however, there is scarcity of literature confronting auto-HSCT with allo-HSCT from unrelated donor (UD-HSCT), especially mismatched UD-HSCT. Methods: We retrospectively compared outcome of allogeneic transplantation from matched (10/10 UD-HSCT) or mismatched at a single HLA-locus unrelated donor (9/10 UD-HSCT) to autologous transplantation in patients with AML in first complete remission (CR1). A total of 2879 patients were included; 1202 patients received auto-HSCT, 1302 10/10 UD-HSCT, and 375 9/10 UD-HSCT. A propensity score-weighted analysis was conducted to control for disease risk imbalances between the groups. Results: Matched 10/10 UD-HSCT was associated with the best leukemia-free survival (10/10 UD-HSCT vs auto-HSCT: HR 0.7, rho = 0.0016). Leukemia-free survival was not statistically different between auto-HSCT and 9/10 UD-HSCT (9/10 UD-HSCT vs auto-HSCT: HR 0.8, rho = 0.2). Overall survival was similar across the groups (10/10 UD-HSCT vs auto-HSCT: HR 0.98, rho = 0.84; 9/10 UD-HSCT vs auto-HSCT: HR 1.1, rho = 0.49). Notably, in intermediate-risk patients, OS was significantly worse for 9/10 UD-HSCT (9/10 UD-HSCT vs auto-HSCT: HR 1.6, rho = 0.049), while it did not differ between auto-HSCT and 10/10 UD-HSCT (HR 0.95, rho = 0.88). In favorable risk patients, auto-HSCT resulted in 3-year LFS and OS rates of 59 and 78 %, respectively. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that in AML patients in CR1 lacking an HLA-matched sibling donor, 10/10 UD-HSCT significantly improves LFS, but this advantage does not translate in better OS compared to auto-HSCT. In intermediate-risk patients lacking a fully HLA-matched donor, auto-HSCT should be considered as a valid option, as better survival appears to be provided by auto-HSCT compared to mismatched UD-HSCT. Finally, auto-HSCT provided an encouraging outcome in patients with favorable risk AML.
  • Poire, Xavier; Labopin, Myriam; Polge, Emmanuelle; Volin, Liisa; Finke, Juergen; Ganser, Arnold; Blaise, Didier; Yakoub-Agha, Ibrahim; Beelen, Dietrich; Forcade, Edouard; Lioure, Bruno; Socie, Gerard; Niederwieser, Dietger; Labussiere-Wallet, Helene; Maertens, Johan; Cornelissen, Jan; Craddock, Charles; Mohty, Mohamad; Esteve, Jordi; Nagler, Arnon (2020)
    Monosomy 7 or deletion 7q (-7/7q-) is the most frequent adverse cytogenetic features reported in acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and is a common indication for allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT). Nevertheless, -7/7q- occurs frequently with other high-risk cytogenetic abnormalities such as complex karyotype (CK), monosomal karyotype (MK), monosomy 5 or deletion 5q (-5/5q-), 17p abnormalities (abn(17p)) or inversion of chromosome 3 (inv(3)), the presence of which may influence the outcomes after SCT. A total of 1109 patients were allocated to this study. Two-year probability of leukemia-free survival (LFS) and overall survival (OS) were 30% and 36%, respectively. Two-year probability of non-relapse mortality (NRM) was 20%. We defined five different cytogenetic subgroups: the "-7/7q- +/- CK group- designated group1," the "MK group-designated group 2," the "-5/5q- group- designated group 3," the "abn(17p) group- designated group 4" and the "inv(3) group- designated group 5." The 2-year probability of LFS in first remission was 48% for group 1, 36.4% for group 2, 28.4% for group 3, 19.1% for group 4 and 17.3% for group 5, respectively (P <.001). Multivariate analysis confirmed those significant differences across groups. Note, SCT in -7/7q- AML provides durable responses in one third of the patients. The presence of -7/7q- with or without CK in the absence of MK, abn(17p) or inv (3) is associated with a better survival after SCT. On the contrary, addition of MK, -5/5q-, abn(17p) or inv(3) identifies a sub-group of patients with poor prognosis even after SCT.