Browsing by Subject "ADAPTIVE INTROGRESSION"

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  • Pulido-Santacruz, Paola; Aleixo, Alexandre; Weir, Jason T. (2020)
    The incidence of introgression during the diversification process and the timespan following divergence when introgression is possible are poorly understood in the neotropics where high species richness could provide extensive opportunities for genetic exchange. We used thousands of genome-wide SNPs to infer phylogenetic relationships, calculate ages of splitting, and to estimate the timing of introgression in a widespread avian neotropical genus of woodcreepers. Five distinct introgression events were reconstructed involving taxa classified both as subspecies and species including lineages descending from the basal-most split, dated to 7.3 million years ago. Introgression occurred between just a few hundred thousand to about 2.5 million years following divergence, suggesting substantial portions of the genome are capable of introgressing across taxa boundaries during a protracted time window of a few million years following divergence. Despite this protracted time window, we found that the proportion of the genome introgressing (6-11%) declines with the time of introgression following divergence, suggesting that the genome becomes progressively more immune to introgression as reproductive isolation increases.
  • Satokangas, Ina; Martin, S. H.; Helanterä, H.; Saramaki, J.; Kulmuni, J. (2020)
    All genes interact with other genes, and their additive effects and epistatic interactions affect an organism's phenotype and fitness. Recent theoretical and empirical work has advanced our understanding of the role of multi-locus interactions in speciation. However, relating different models to one another and to empirical observations is challenging. This review focuses on multi-locus interactions that lead to reproductive isolation (RI) through reduced hybrid fitness. We first review theoretical approaches and show how recent work incorporating a mechanistic understanding of multi-locus interactions recapitulates earlier models, but also makes novel predictions concerning the build-up of RI. These include high variance in the build-up rate of RI among taxa, the emergence of strong incompatibilities producing localized barriers to introgression, and an effect of population size on the build-up of RI. We then review recent experimental approaches to detect multi-locus interactions underlying RI using genomic data. We argue that future studies would benefit from overlapping methods like ancestry disequilibrium scans, genome scans of differentiation and analyses of hybrid gene expression. Finally, we highlight a need for further overlap between theoretical and empirical work, and approaches that predict what kind of patterns multi-locus interactions resulting in incompatibilities will leave in genome-wide polymorphism data. This article is part of the theme issue 'Towards the completion of speciation: the evolution of reproductive isolation beyond the first barriers'.
  • Nouhaud, Pierre; Blanckaert, Alexandre; Bank, Claudia; Kulmuni, Jonna (2020)
    Hybridization has broad evolutionary consequences, from fueling or counteracting speciation to facilitating adaptation to novel environments. Hybridization and subsequent introgression appear widespread along the tree of life. However, our understanding of how distinct evolutionary forces shape admixed genomes and the fate of introgressed genetic variants remains scarce. Most admixture research in animals has focused on diploid organisms. Wepropose that haplodiploid organisms can help resolve open questions about the genomic consequences of hybridization in natural populations. The ploidy difference between haploid males and diploid females, the availability of genome-wide male haplotypes, and ongoing cases of admixture make haplodiploid organisms promising models to improve our knowledge with regards to the evolution of hybrid genomes.