Browsing by Subject "ADULT HIPPOCAMPAL NEUROGENESIS"

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  • Goubert, Emmanuelle; Altvater, Marc; Rovira, Marie-Noelle; Khalilov, Ilgam; Mazzarino, Morgane; Sebastiani, Anne; Schaefer, Michael K. E.; Rivera, Claudio; Pellegrino, Christophe (2019)
    Brain trauma triggers a cascade of deleterious events leading to enhanced incidence of drug resistant epilepsies, depression, and cognitive dysfunctions. The underlying mechanisms leading to these alterations are poorly understood and treatment that attenuates those sequels are not available. Using controlled-cortical impact as an experimental model of brain trauma in adult mice, we found a strong suppressive effect of the sodium-potassium-chloride importer (NKCC1) specific antagonist bumetanide on the appearance of depressive-like behavior. We demonstrate that this alteration in behavior is associated with an impairment of post-traumatic secondary neurogenesis within the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. The mechanism mediating the effect of bumetanide involves early transient changes in the expression of chloride regulatory proteins and qualitative changes in GABA(A) mediated transmission from hyperpolarizing to depolarizing after brain trauma. This work opens new perspectives in the early treatment of human post-traumatic induced depression. Our results strongly suggest that bumetanide might constitute an efficient prophylactic treatment to reduce neurological and psychiatric consequences of brain trauma.
  • Castren, Eero; Hen, Rene (2013)
  • Kraus, Christoph; Castrén, Eero; Kasper, Siegfried; Lanzenberger, Rupert (2017)
    Serotonin modulates neuroplasticity, especially during early life, and dysfunctions in both systems likewise contribute to pathophysiology of depression. Recent findings demonstrate that serotonin reuptake inhibitors trigger reactivation of juvenile-like neuroplasticity. How these findings translate to clinical antidepressant treatment in major depressive disorder remains unclear. With this review, we link preclinical with clinical work on serotonin and neuroplasticity to bring two pathophysiologic models in clinical depression closer together. Dysfunctional developmental plasticity impacts on later-life cognitive and emotional functions, changes of synaptic serotonin levels and receptor levels are coupled with altered synaptic plasticity and neurogenesis. Structural magnetic resonance imaging in patients reveals disease-state-specific reductions of gray matter, a marker of neuroplasticity, and reversibility upon selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor treatment. Translational evidence from magnetic resonance imaging in animals support that reduced densities and sizes of neurons and reduced hippocampal volumes in depressive patients could be attributable to changes of serotonergic neuroplasticity. Since ketamine, physical exercise or learning enhance neuroplasticity, combinatory paradigms with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors could enhance clinical treatment of depression. (C) 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • Han, Jinah; Calvo, Charles-Felix; Kang, Tae Hyuk; Baker, Kasey L.; Park, June-Hee; Parras, Carlos; Levittas, Marine; Birba, Ulrick; Pibouin-Fragner, Laurence; Fragner, Pascal; Bilguvar, Kaya; Duman, Ronald S.; Nurmi, Harri Juhani; Alitalo, Kari; Eichmann, Anne C.; Thomas, Jean-Leon (2015)