Browsing by Subject "AIR-POLLUTION"

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  • Halonen, Jaana I.; Erhola, Marina; Furman, Eeva; Haahtela, Tari; Jousilahti, Pekka; Barouki, Robert; Bergman, Åke; Billo, Nils E.; Fuller, Richard; Haines, Andrew; Kogevinas, Manolis; Kolossa-Gehring, Marike; Krauze, Kinga; Lanki, Timo; Vicente, Joana Lobo; Messerli, Peter; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark; Paloniemi, Riikka; Peters, Annette; Posch, Karl-Heinz; Timonen, Pekka; Vermeulen, Roel; Virtanen, Suvi M.; Bousquet, Jean; Antó, Josep M. (2021)
    In 2015, the Rockefeller Foundation-Lancet Commission launched a report introducing a novel approach called Planetary Health and proposed a concept, a strategy and a course of action. To discuss the concept of Planetary Health in the context of Europe, a conference entitled: “Europe That Protects: Safeguarding Our Planet, Safeguarding Our Health” was held in Helsinki in December 2019. The conference participants concluded with a need for action to support Planetary Health during the 2020s. The Helsinki Declaration emphasizes the urgency to act as scientific evidence shows that human activities are causing climate change, biodiversity loss, land degradation, overuse of natural resources and pollution. They threaten the health and safety of human kind. Global, regional, national, local and individual initiatives are called for and multidisciplinary and multisectorial actions and measures are needed. A framework for an action plan is suggested that can be modified for local needs. Accordingly, a shift from fragmented approaches to policy and practice towards systematic actions will promote human health and health of the planet. Systems thinking will feed into conserving nature and biodiversity, and into halting climate change. The Planetary Health paradigm ‒ the health of human civilization and the state of natural systems on which it depends ‒ must become the driver for all policies.
  • Alghamdi, Mansour A.; Al-Hunaiti, Afnan; Arar, Sharif; Khoder, Mamdouh; Abdelmaksoud, Ahmad S.; Al-Jeelani, Hisham; Lihavainen, Heikki; Hyvärinen, Antti; Shabbaj, Ibrahim I.; Almehmadi, Fahd M.; Zaidan, Martha A.; Hussein, Tareq; Dada, Lubna (2019)
    Ground level ozone (O-3) plays an important role in controlling the oxidation budget in the boundary layer and thus affects the environment and causes severe health disorders. Ozone gas, being one of the well-known greenhouse gases, although present in small quantities, contributes to global warming. In this study, we present a predictive model for the steady-state ozone concentrations during daytime (13:00-17:00) and nighttime (01:00-05:00) at an urban coastal site. The model is based on a modified approach of the null cycle of O-3 and NOx and was evaluated against a one-year data-base of O-3 and nitrogen oxides (NO and NO2) measured at an urban coastal site in Jeddah, on the west coast of Saudi Arabia. The model for daytime concentrations was found to be linearly dependent on the concentration ratio of NO2 to NO whereas that for the nighttime period was suggested to be inversely proportional to NO2 concentrations. Knowing that reactions involved in tropospheric O-3 formation are very complex, this proposed model provides reasonable predictions for the daytime and nighttime concentrations. Since the current description of the model is solely based on the null cycle of O-3 and NOx, other precursors could be considered in future development of this model. This study will serve as basis for future studies that might introduce informing strategies to control ground level O-3 concentrations, as well as its precursors' emissions.
  • Hussein, Tareq; Juwhari, Hassan; Al Kuisi, Mustafa; Alkattan, Hamza; Lahlouh, Bashar; Al-Hunaiti, Afnan (2018)
    In this study, we analyzed the concentrations of accumulation and coarse modes measured during November 2013–July 2017 at an urban background site in Amman, Jordan. The concentrations showed distinct seasonal variations with high concentrations with a monthly average higher than 100 cm−3 and 1.5 cm−3, respectively, for accumulation and coarse modes during the winter and low concentrations with a monthly average less than 40 cm−3 and 1–1.5 cm−3, respectively, for accumulation and coarse modes during the summer. Sand and dust storms (SDS) affected the coarse mode during the early spring whereas local dust re-suspension affected them during the autumn. The gravimetric analysis confirmed the seasonal variation of the calculated particulate mass concentration but suggested that the assumption of spherical particles and unit density is not always proper. The ATR-FTIR analysis of selected filters revealed that aerosols in the background atmosphere of Amman are a mixture of locally emitted (fossil fuel combustion) and local/regional dust. Based on the 24-h average of the calculated PM10, the pollution standard index (PSI) revealed that about 81% of the days were either good or moderate air quality conditions. About 71% of the days were below the 24-h PM10 limit value according to the Jordanian air quality standards (120 μg m−3).
  • Flamant, Cyrille; Deroubaix, Adrien; Chazette, Patrick; Brito, Joel; Gaetani, Marco; Knippertz, Peter; Fink, Andreas H.; de Coetlogon, Gaelle; Menut, Laurent; Colomb, Aurelie; Denjean, Cyrielle; Meynadier, Remi; Rosenberg, Philip; Dupuy, Regis; Dominutti, Pamela; Duplissy, Jonathan; Bourrianne, Thierry; Schwarzenboeck, Alfons; Ramonet, Michel; Totems, Julien (2018)
    The complex vertical distribution of aerosols over coastal southernWest Africa (SWA) is investigated using airborne observations and numerical simulations. Observations were gathered on 2 July 2016 offshore of Ghana and Togo, during the field phase of the Dynamics-Aerosol-Chemistry-Cloud Interactions in West Africa project. This was the only flight conducted over the ocean during which a downward-looking lidar was operational. The aerosol loading in the lower troposphere includes emissions from coastal cities (Accra, Lome, Cotonou, and Lagos) as well as biomass burning aerosol and dust associated with long-range transport from central Africa and the Sahara, respectively. Our results indicate that the aerosol distribution on this day is impacted by subsidence associated with zonal and meridional regional-scale overturning circulations associated with the land-sea surface temperature contrast and orography over Ghana and Togo, as typically observed on hot, cloud-free summer days such as 2 July 2016. Furthermore, we show that the zonal circulation evidenced on 2 July is a persistent feature over the Gulf of Guinea during July 2016. Numerical tracer re-lease experiments highlight the dominance of aged emissions from Accra on the observed pollution plume loadings over the ocean, in the area of aircraft operation. The contribution of aged emission from Lome and Cotonou is also evident above the marine boundary layer. Given the general direction of the monsoon flow, the tracer experiments indicate no contribution from Lagos emissions to the atmospheric composition of the area west of Cotonou, where our airborne observations were gathered. The tracer plume does not extend very far south over the ocean (i.e. less than 100 km from Accra), mostly because emissions are transported northeastward near the surface over land and westward above the marine atmospheric boundary layer. The latter is possible due to interactions between the monsoon flow, complex terrain, and land-sea breeze systems, which support the vertical mixing of the urban pollution. This work sheds light on the complex - and to date undocumented - mechanisms by which coastal shallow circulations can distribute atmospheric pollutants over the densely populated SWA region.
  • Shen, Yicheng; Virkkula, Aki; Ding, Aijun; Wang, Jiaping; Chi, Xuguang; Nie, Wei; Qi, Ximeng; Huang, Xin; Liu, Qiang; Zheng, Longfei; Xu, Zheng; Petäjä, Tuukka; Aalto, Pasi P.; Fu, Congbin; Kulmala, Markku (2018)
    Aerosol optical properties (AOPs) and supporting parameters-particle number size distributions, PM2 : 5 mass concentrations, and the concentrations of trace gases (NOx and NOy) - were measured at SORPES, a regional background station in Nanjing, China from June 2013 to May 2015. The aerosol was highly scattering: the average scattering coefficient was sigma(sp) =403 +/- 314Mm 1, the absorption coefficient sigma(ap) =26 +/- 19Mm 1, and the single-scattering albedo SS Lambda =0.93 +/- 0.03 for green light. The SSA in Nanjing appears to be slightly higher than published values from several other sites in China and elsewhere. The average Angstrom exponent of absorption (AAE) for the wavelength range 370-950 nm was 1.04 and the AAE range was 0.7-1.4. These AAE values can be explained with different amounts of non-absorbing coating on pure black carbon (BC) cores and different core sizes rather than contribution by brown carbon. The AOPs had typical seasonal cycles with high sigma(sp) and sigma(ap) in winter and low ones in summer: the averages were sigma(sp) =544 +/- 422 and sigma(ap) =36 +/- 24Mm 1 in winter and sigma(sp) =342 +/- 281 and sigma(ap) =20 +/- 13Mm 1 in summer. The intensive AOPs had no clear seasonal cycles, the variations in them were rather related to the evolution of pollution episodes. The diurnal cycles of the intensive AOPs were clear and in agreement with the cycle of the particle number size distribution. The diurnal cycle of SSA was similar to that of the air photochemical age, suggesting that the darkest aerosol originated from fresh traffic emissions. A Lagrangian retroplume analysis showed that the potential source areas of high sigma(sp) and sigma(ap) are mainly in eastern China. Synoptic weather phenomena dominated the cycle of AOPs on a temporal scale of 3-7 days. During pollution episodes, modeled boundary layer height decreased, whereas PM2.5 concentrations and sigma(sp) and sigma(ap) typically increased gradually and remained high during several days but decreased faster, sometimes by even more than an order of magnitude within some hours. During the growth phase of the pollution episodes the intensive AOPs evolved clearly. The mass scattering efficiency MSE of PM2.5 grew during the extended pollution episodes from similar to 4 to similar to 6m(2) g(-1) and the mass fraction of BCe decreased from similar to 10 to similar to 3% during the growth phase of the episodes. Particle growth resulted in the backscatter fraction decreasing from more than 0.16 to less than 0.10, SSA growing from less than 0.9 to more than 0.95, and radiative forcing efficiency (RFE) changing from less than -26Wm(-2) to more than 24Wm(-2), which means that the magnitude of RFE decreased. The RFE probability distribution at SORPES was clearly narrower than at a clean background site which is in agreement with a published RFE climatology.
  • Chu, Biwu; Kerminen, Veli-Matti; Bianchi, Federico; Yan, Chao; Petäjä, Tuukka; Kulmala, Markku (2019)
    New particle formation (NPF) studies in China were summarized comprehensively in this paper. NPF frequency, formation rate, and particle growth rate were closely compared among the observations carried out at different types of sites in different regions of China in different seasons, with the aim of exploring the nucleation and particle growth mechanisms. The interactions between air pollution and NPF are discussed, emphasizing the properties of NPF under heavy pollution conditions. The current understanding of NPF cannot fully explain the frequent occurrence of NPF at high aerosol loadings in China, and possible reasons for this phenomenon are proposed. The effects of NPF and some aspects of NPF research requiring further investigation are also summarized in this paper.
  • Nielsen, Ingeborg E.; Skov, Henrik; Massling, Andreas; Eriksson, Axel C.; Dall'Osto, Manuel; Junninen, Heikki; Sarnela, Nina; Lange, Robert; Collier, Sonya; Zhang, Qi; Cappa, Christopher D.; Nøjgaard, Jacob K. (2019)
    There are limited measurements of the chemical composition, abundance and sources of atmospheric particles in the High Arctic To address this, we report 93 d of soot particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS) data collected from 20 February to 23 May 2015 at Villum Research Station (VRS) in northern Greenland (81 degrees 36' N). During this period, we observed the Arctic haze phenomenon with elevated PM1 concentrations ranging from an average of 2.3, 2.3 and 3.3 mu g m(-3) in February, March and April, respectively, to 1.2 mu g m(-3) in May. Particulate sulfate (SO42-) accounted for 66 % of the non-refractory PM1 with the highest concentration until the end of April and decreasing in May. The second most abundant species was organic aerosol (OA) (24 %). Both OA and PM1, estimated from the sum of all collected species, showed a marked decrease throughout May in accordance with the polar front moving north, together with changes in aerosol removal processes. The highest refractory black carbon (rBC) concentrations were found in the first month of the campaign, averaging 0.2 mu g m(-3). In March and April, rBC averaged 0.1 mu g m(-3) while decreasing to 0.02 mu g m(-3) in May. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) of the OA mass spectra yielded three factors: (1) a hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA) factor, which was dominated by primary aerosols and accounted for 12 % of OA mass, (2) an Arctic haze organic aerosol (AOA) factor and (3) a more oxygenated marine organic aerosol (MOA) factor. AOA dominated until mid-April (64 %-81 % of OA), while being nearly absent from the end of May and correlated significantly with SO42-, suggesting the main part of that factor is secondary OA. The MOA emerged late at the end of March, where it increased with solar radiation and reduced sea ice extent and dominated OA for the rest of the campaign until the end of May (24 %-74 % of OA), while AOA was nearly absent. The highest O/C ratio (0.95) and S/C ratio (0.011) was found for MOA. Our data support the current understanding that Arctic aerosols are highly influenced by secondary aerosol formation and receives an important contribution from marine emissions during Arctic spring in remote High Arctic areas. In view of a changing Arctic climate with changing sea-ice extent, biogenic processes and corresponding source strengths, highly time-resolved data are needed in order to elucidate the components dominating aerosol concentrations and enhance the understanding of the processes taking place.
  • Sundström, A. -M.; Nikandrova, A.; Atlaskina, K.; Nieminen, T.; Vakkari, V.; Laakso, L.; Beukes, J. P.; Arola, A.; van Zyl, P. G.; Josipovic, M.; Venter, A. D.; Jaars, K.; Pienaar, J. J.; Piketh, S.; Wiedensohler, A.; Chiloane, E. K.; de Leeuw, G.; Kulmala, Markku (2015)
    Proxies for estimating nucleation mode number concentrations and further simplification for their use with satellite data have been presented in Kulmala et al. (2011). In this paper we discuss the underlying assumptions for these simplifications and evaluate the resulting proxies over an area in South Africa based on a comparison with a suite of ground-based measurements available from four different stations. The proxies are formulated in terms of sources (concentrations of precursor gases (NO2 and SO2) and UVB radiation intensity near the surface) and a sink term related to removal of the precursor gases due to condensation on pre-existing aerosols. A-Train satellite data are used as input to compute proxies. Both the input data and the resulting proxies are compared with those obtained from ground-based measurements. In particular, a detailed study is presented on the substitution of the local condensation sink (CS) with satellite aerosol optical depth (AOD), which is a column-integrated parameter. One of the main factors affecting the disagreement between CS and AOD is the presence of elevated aerosol layers. Overall, the correlation between proxies calculated from the in situ data and observed nucleation mode particle number concentrations (N-nuc) remained low. At the time of the satellite overpass (13: 00-14: 00 LT) the highest correlation is observed for SO2/CS (R-2 D 0.2). However, when the proxies are calculated using satellite data, only NO2/AOD showed some correlation with N-nuc (R-2 D 0.2). This can be explained by the relatively high uncertainties related especially to the satellite SO2 columns and by the positive correlation that is observed between the ground-based SO2 and NO2 concentrations. In fact, results show that the satellite NO2 columns compare better with in situ SO2 concentration than the satellite SO2 column. Despite the high uncertainties related to the proxies calculated using satellite data, the proxies calculated from the in situ data did not better predict N-nuc. Hence, overall improvements in the formulation of the proxies are needed.
  • Al Bawab, Abeer; Al-Hunaiti, Afnan; Abu Mallouh, Saida; Bozeya, Ayat; Abu-Zurayk, Rund; Hussein, Tareq (2020)
    Some cultural heritage sites in Jordan are in urban areas being exposed to anthropogenic pollution. Therefore, it is important to evaluate the contamination at these sites to protect them. Here, we considered a Roman archeological site (Nymphaeum) situated in Amman. The contamination in soil, plants, and building stones did not show spatial distribution within the site. The contamination was the highest in soil (heavy metals 10(4) -10(7) ppb and sulfur similar to 3.5x10(6) ppb) whereas in plants was the least for Cr (similar to 400 ppb) and in building stones it was the least for Cu (similar to 860 ppb). The highest contamination in plants and building stones was found for Al (similar to 5x10(4) and similar to 6.2x10(5) ppb respectively). The sulfur content in plants (similar to 7.6x10(5) ppb) was higher than that in the building stones (similar to 2.3x10(5) ppb). The heavy metals and sulfur contamination in the building stones were lower than what was reported elsewhere outside Jordan.
  • Wang, Yonghong; Gao, Wenkang; Wang, Shuai; Song, Tao; Gong, Zhengyu; Ji, Dongsheng; Wang, Lili; Liu, Zirui; Tang, Guiqian; Huo, Yanfeng; Tian, Shili; Li, Jiayun; Li, Mingge; Yang, Yuan; Chu, Biwu; Petäjä, Tuukka; Kerminen, Veli-Matti; He, Hong; Hao, Jiming; Kulmala, Markku; Wang, Yuesi; Zhang, Yuanhang (2020)
    Although much attention has been paid to investigating and controlling air pollution in China, the trends of air-pollutant concentrations on a national scale have remained unclear. Here, we quantitatively investigated the variation of air pollutants in China using long-term comprehensive data sets from 2013 to 2017, during which Chinese government made major efforts to reduce anthropogenic emission in polluted regions. Our results show a significant decreasing trend in the PM2.5 concentration in heavily polluted regions of eastern China, with an annual decrease of similar to 7% compared with measurements in 2013. The measured decreased concentrations of SO2, NO2 and CO (a proxy for anthropogenic volatile organic compounds) could explain a large fraction of the decreased PM2.5 concentrations in different regions. As a consequence, the heavily polluted days decreased significantly in corresponding regions. Concentrations of organic aerosol, nitrate, sulfate, ammonium and chloride measured in urban Beijing revealed a remarkable reduction from 2013 to 2017, connecting the decreases in aerosol precursors with corresponding chemical components closely. However, surface-ozone concentrations showed increasing trends in most urban stations from 2013 to 2017, which indicates stronger photochemical pollution. The boundary-layer height in capital cities of eastern China showed no significant trends over the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei, Yangtze River Delta and Pearl River Delta regions from 2013 to 2017, which confirmed the reduction in anthropogenic emissions. Our results demonstrated that the Chinese government was successful in the reduction of particulate matter in urban areas from 2013 to 2017, although the ozone concentration has increased significantly, suggesting a more complex mechanism of improving Chinese air quality in the future.
  • Bousquet, Jean; Bedbrook, Anna; Czarlewski, Wienczyslawa; De Carlo, Giuseppe; Fonseca, Joao A.; Ballester, Miguel A. Gonzalez; Illario, Maddalena; Koskinen, Seppo; Laatikainen, Tiina; Onorato, Gabrielle L.; Palkonen, Susanna; Patella, Vincenzo; Nhan, Pham-Thi; Puggioni, Francesca; Ventura, Maria Teresa; Joos, Guy; Kuna, Piotr; Louis, Renaud; Makris, Michael; Zalud, Petra; Zuberbier, Torsten; Bachert, Claus; Brussino, Luisa; Carreiro-Martins, Pedro; Carrion y Ribas, Carme; Chalubinski, Maciej; Costa, Elisio M.; de Vries, Govert; Gemicioglu, Bilun; Gennimata, Dimitra; Micheli, Yann; Niedoszytko, Marek; Regateiro, Frederico S.; Romantowski, Jan; Taborda-Barata, Luis; Toppila-Salmi, Sanna; Tsiligianni, Ioanna; Viart, Frederic; Laune, Daniel (2021)
  • Kangasniemi, Oskari; Kuuluvainen, Heino; Heikkilä, Joni; Pirjola, Liisa; Niemi, Jarkko V.; Timonen, Hilkka; Saarikoski, Sanna; Rönkkö, Topi; Dal Maso, Miikka (2019)
    Traffic is a major source of ultrafine aerosol particles in urban environments. Recent studies show that a significant fraction of traffic-related particles are only few nanometers in diameter. Here, we study the dispersion of this nanocluster aerosol (NCA) in the size range 1.3-4 nm. We measured particle concentrations near a major highway in the Helsinki region of Finland, varying the distance from the highway. Additionally, modelling studies were performed to gain further information on how different transformation processes affect NCA dispersion. The roadside measurements showed that NCA concentrations fell more rapidly than the total particle concentrations, especially during the morning. However, a significant amount of NCA particles remained as the aerosol population evolved. Modelling studies showed that, while dilution is the main process acting on the total particle concentration, deposition also had a significant impact. Condensation and possibly enhanced deposition of NCA were the main plausible processes explaining why dispersion is faster for NCA than for total particle concentration, while the effect of coagulation on all size ranges was small. Based on our results, we conclude that NCA may play a significant role in urban environments, since, rather than being scavenged by larger particles, NCA particles remain in the particle population and grow by condensation.
  • Reinius, Lovisa E.; Gref, Anna; Saaf, Annika; Acevedo, Nathalie; Joerink, Maaike; Kupczyk, Maciej; D'Amato, Mauro; Bergstroem, Anna; Melen, Erik; Scheynius, Annika; Dahlen, Sven-Erik; Pershagen, Goran; Soderhall, Cilla; Kere, Juha; BIOAIR Study Grp (2013)
  • Casas, Lidia; Karvonen, Anne M.; Kirjavainen, Pirkka V.; Täubel, Martin; Hyytiäinen, Heidi; Jayaprakash, Balamuralikrishna; Lehmann, Irina; Standl, Marie; Pekkanen, Juha; Heinrich, Joachim (2019)
    This study evaluates the association between indoor microbial diversity early in life and hyperactivity/inattention symptoms in children at ages 10 and 15 years.A random sample enriched with subjects with hyperactivity/inattention at age 15 years was selected from the German LISA birth cohort. Bedroom floor dust was collected at age 3 months and 4 bacterial and fungal diversity measures [number of observed operational taxonomic units (OTUs), Chao1, Shannon and Simpson indices] were calculated from Illumina MiSeq sequencing data. Hyperactivity/inattention was based on the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire at ages 10 and 15 (cut-off >= 7). Adjusted associations between 4 diversity measures in tertiles and hyperactivity/inattention were investigated with weighted and survey logistic regression models. We included 226 individuals with information on microbial diversity and hyperactivity/inattention. Early life bacterial diversity was inversely associated with hyperactivity/inattention at age 10 [bacterial OTUs (medium vs low: aOR = 0.4, 95%CI = (0.2-0.8)) and Chao1 (medium vs low: 0.3 (0.1-0.5); high vs low: 0.3 (0.2-0.6)], whereas fungal diversity was directly associated [Chao1 (high vs low: 2.1 (1.1-4.0)), Shannon (medium vs low: 2.8 (1.3-5.8)), and Simpson (medium vs low: 4.7 (2.4-9.3))]. At age 15, only Shannon index was significantly associated with hyperactivity/inattention [bacteria (medium vs low: 2.3 (1.2-4.2); fungi (high vs low: 0.5 (0.3-0.9))]. In conclusion, early life exposure to microbial diversity may play a role in the psychobehavioural development. We observe heterogeneity in the direction of the associations encouraging further longitudinal studies to deepen our understanding of the characteristics of the microbial community underlying the observed associations.
  • Viippola, Viljami; Yli-Pelkonen, Vesa; Järvi, Leena; Kulmala, Markku; Setälä, Heikki (2020)
    Trees and other vegetation have been advocated as a mitigation measure for urban air pollution mainly due to the fact that they passively filter particles from the air. However, mounting evidence suggests that vegetation may also worsen air quality by slowing the dispersion of pollutants and by producing volatile organic compounds that contribute to formation of ozone and other secondary pollutants. We monitored nanoparticle (>10 nm) counts along distance gradients away from major roads along paired transects across open and forested landscapes in Baltimore (USA), Helsinki (Finland) and Shenyang (China) − i.e. sites in three biomes with different pollution levels − using condensation particle counters. Mean particle number concentrations averaged across all sampling sites were clearly reduced (15 %) by the presence of forest cover only in Helsinki. For Baltimore and Shenyang, levels showed no significant difference between the open and forested transects at any of the sampling distances. This suggests that nanoparticle deposition on trees is often counterbalanced by other factors, including differing flow fields and aerosol processes under varying meteorological conditions. Similarly, consistent differences in high frequency data patterns between the transects were detected only in Helsinki. No correlations between nanoparticle concentrations and solar radiation or local wind speed as affecting nanoparticle abundances were found, but they were to some extent associated with canopy closure. These data add to the accumulating evidence according to which trees do not necessarily improve air quality in near-road environments.
  • Ding, A. J.; Huang, X.; Nie, W.; Sun, J. N.; Kerminen, V. -M.; Petäjä, T.; Su, H.; Cheng, Y. F.; Yang, X. -Q.; Wang, M. H.; Chi, X. G.; Wang, J. P.; Virkkula, A.; Guo, W. D.; Yuan, J.; Wang, S. Y.; Zhang, R. J.; Wu, Y. F.; Song, Y.; Zhu, T.; Zilitinkevich, S.; Kulmala, M.; Fu, C. B. (2016)
    Aerosol-planetary boundary layer (PBL) interactions have been found to enhance air pollution in megacities in China. We show that black carbon (BC) aerosols play the key role in modifying the PBL meteorology and hence enhancing the haze pollution. With model simulations and data analysis from various field observations in December 2013, we demonstrate that BC induces heating in the PBL, particularly in the upper PBL, and the resulting decreased surface heat flux substantially depresses the development of PBL and consequently enhances the occurrences of extreme haze pollution episodes. We define this process as the dome effect of BC and suggest an urgent need for reducing BC emissions as an efficient way to mitigate the extreme haze pollution in megacities of China.
  • Nieminen, Pentti; Panychev, Dmitry; Lyalyushkin, Sergei; Komarov, German; Nikanov, Alexander; Borisenko, Mark; Kinnula, Vuokko L.; Toljamo, Tuula (2013)
  • Fung, Pak L.; Zaidan, Martha A.; Timonen, Hilkka; Niemi, Jarkko V.; Kousa, Anu; Kuula, Joel; Luoma, Krista; Tarkoma, Sasu; Petäjä, Tuukka; Kulmala, Markku; Hussein, Tareq (2021)
    Air quality prediction with black-box (BB) modelling is gaining widespread interest in research and industry. This type of data-driven models work generally better in terms of accuracy but are limited to capture physical, chemical and meteorological processes and therefore accountability for interpretation. In this paper, we evaluated different white-box (WB) and BB methods that estimate atmospheric black carbon (BC) concentration by a suite of observations from the same measurement site. This study involves data in the period of 1st January 2017–31st December 2018 from two measurement sites, from a street canyon site in Mäkelänkatu and from an urban background site in Kumpula, in Helsinki, Finland. At the street canyon site, WB models performed (R² = 0.81–0.87) in a similar way as the BB models did (R² = 0.86–0.87). The overall performance of the BC concentration estimation methods at the urban background site was much worse probably because of a combination of smaller dynamic variability in the BC values and longer data gaps. However, the difference in WB (R²= 0.44–0.60) and BB models (R² = 0.41–0.64) was not significant. Furthermore, the WB models are closer to physics-based models, and it is easier to spot the relative importance of the predictor variable and determine if the model output makes sense. This feature outweighs slightly higher performance of some individual BB models, and inherently the WB models are a better choice due to their transparency in the model architecture. Among all the WB models, IAP and LASSO are recommended due to its flexibility and its efficiency, respectively. Our findings also ascertain the importance of temporal properties in statistical modelling. In the future, the developed BC estimation model could serve as a virtual sensor and complement the current air quality monitoring.
  • Pirjola, L.; Rönkkö, T.; Saukko, E.; Parviainen, H.; Malinen, A.; Alanen, J.; Saveljeff, H. (2017)
    Exhaust emissions emitted by a non-road mobile machine were studied chasing a tractor in real-world conditions and repeating the same transient tests with a similar engine on an engine dynamometer where additionally, non-road steady state tests were carried out. The engines were equipped with an oxidation catalyst (DOC) and a selective catalytic reduction (SCR)system, and they were fuelled by fossil diesel fuel with ultra-low sulphur content and hydrotreated vegetable oil (HVO). By substituting diesel fuel with HVO the on-road emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx) reduced 20% and particle number 44%, the emission factors being EFNOx =1.62 +/- 0.04 g/kWh and EFN = (28.2 +/- 7.8) x 10(13) #/kWh. Similar trend was observed for NOx at laboratory although the emissions were somewhat smaller than on-road. In contrast to real-world, in the laboratory experiment the EFN was only 2% smaller with HVO than with diesel, and these emission factors were almost one order of magnitude smaller than observed on-road. The number size distribution and volatility measurements showed that in real-world experiments small nucleation mode particles were formed during uphill and during downhill in engine braking conditions. These were not observed at laboratory. However, nucleation mode particles were observed in the laboratory experiments at high load steady driving conditions. At steady state tests the emissions strongly depended on engine load and engine speed with both fuels. (C) 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • Molgaard, Bjarke; Viitanen, Anna-Kaisa; Kangas, Anneli; Huhtiniemi, Marika; Larsen, Soren Thor; Vanhala, Esa; Hussein, Tareq; Boor, Brandon E.; Hämeri, Kaarle; Koivisto, Antti Joonas (2015)
    Due to the health risk related to occupational air pollution exposure, we assessed concentrations and identified sources of particles and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in a handcraft workshop producing fishing lures. The work processes in the site included polyurethane molding, spray painting, lacquering, and gluing. We measured total VOC (TVOC) concentrations and particle size distributions at three locations representing the various phases of the manufacturing and assembly process. The mean working-hour TVOC concentrations in three locations studied were 41, 37, and 24 ppm according to photo-ionization detector measurements. The mean working-hour particle number concentration varied between locations from 3000 to 36,000 cm(-3). Analysis of temporal and spatial variations of TVOC concentrations revealed that there were at least four substantial VOC sources: spray gluing, mold-release agent spraying, continuous evaporation from various lacquer and paint containers, and either spray painting or lacquering (probably both). The mold-release agent spray was indirectly also a major source of ultrafine particles. The workers' exposure can be reduced by improving the local exhaust ventilation at the known sources and by increasing the ventilation rate in the area with the continuous source.