Browsing by Subject "ALLERGIC DISEASE"

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  • Twardziok, Monika; Schroder, Paul C.; Krusche, Johanna; Casaca, Vera I.; Illi, Sabina; Bock, Andreas; Loss, Georg J.; Kabesch, Michael; Toncheva, Antoaneta A.; Roduit, Caroline; Depner, Martin; Genuneit, Jon; Renz, Harald; Roponen, Marjut; Weber, Juliane; Braun-Fahrlander, Charlotte; Riedler, Josef; Lauener, Roger; Vuitton, Dominique Angele; Dalphin, Jean-Charles; Pekkanen, Juha; von Mutius, Erika; Schaub, Bianca; PASTURE Study Grp; Hyvarinen, Anne; Karvonen, Anne M.; Kirjavainen, Pirkka V.; Remes, Sami; Kaulek, Vincent; Dalphin, Marie-Laure; Ege, Markus; Pfefferle, Petra I.; Doekes, Gert (2017)
    Several studies report an important role of CD8(+) cytotoxic T-cells in atopy. Farm children show protection against atopy development, partly explained by CD4(+) T-cell subtypes. Additional effects of CD8(+) T-cells are unknown being investigated in this study within the PASTURE/EFRAIM birth cohort in PBMCs from farming and non-farming 6-year-old (N = 76) German children. CD3(+) CD8(+) CD25(+) T-cells were analyzed by flow cytometry. Genotyping of 17q21 locus-SNPs associated with childhood asthma was performed. No differences in CD8(+) T-cell subsets were seen between farmers and non-farmers regardless of asthma. Among farm children, asthmatics displayed increased CD3(+) CD8(low)(CD25(+)) T-cells compared to non-asthmatics. Asthmatic farm children exhibited a lower PI-induced stimulatory capacity of CD3(+) CD8(low)(CD25(+)) cells and a lower IFN-gamma secretion than non-asthmatic farm children. Among farm children with GSDMB and ORMDL3 risk alleles, asthmatics displayed higher CD3(+) CD8(low) cells than non-asthmatics. Our data indicates a specific role of CD8(low) T-cells in asthmatic farm children. (C) 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Ruokolainen, Lasse; Lehtimaki, Jenni; Karkman, Antti; Haahtela, Tari; von Hertzen, Leena; Fyhrquist, Nanna (2017)
    The western world has witnessed a rising epidemic of chronic inflammatory disorders, such as allergies and asthma. This epidemic is expected to spread also to the rest of the world, where allergies have to date been practically absent, along with adoption of western lifestyle. In parallel, biological diversity is globally declining. This inspired Ilkka Hanski, together with medical doctors, to formulate the biodiversity hypothesis of allergic disease. This hypothesis proposes that reduced contact with natural environments, including natural microbial diversity, is associated with unhealthy human microbiota, less able to educate the immune system. Contact with beneficial bacteria, particularly early in life, seems to be instrumental to the normal development of immune responses. Changes in lifestyle and diet, destruction of natural environments, and urbanisation threaten our natural exposure to these beneficial bacteria and thus also reduce their impact on our physiology. To ensure a healthy life, we need to preserve biodiversity in the environment and make sure it finds a favourable home in us. In this review, we will focus on the role of commensal microbiota in human health and wellbeing, as well as the interaction between our microbiota and environmental microbiota, highlighting the contribution of Ilkka Hanski.
  • Ringel-Kulka, Tamar; Cheng, Jing; Ringel, Yehuda; Salojarvi, Jarkko; Carroll, Ian; Palva, Airi; de Vos, Willem M.; Satokari, Reetta (2013)
  • Harju, Maijakaisa; Keski-Nisula, Leea; Georgiadis, Leena; Raatikainen, Kaisa; Raisanen, Sari; Heinonen, Seppo (2015)