Browsing by Subject "ALZHEIMERS-DISEASE"

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  • Kun-Rodrigues, Celia; Orme, Tatiana; Carmona, Susana; Hernandez, Dena G.; Ross, Owen A.; Eicher, John D.; Shepherd, Claire; Parkkinen, Laura; Darwent, Lee; Heckman, Michael G.; Scholz, Sonja W.; Troncoso, Juan C.; Pletnikova, Olga; Dawson, Ted; Rosenthal, Liana; Ansorge, Olaf; Clarimonm, Jordi; Lleo, Alberto; Morenas-Rodriguez, Estrella; Clark, Lorraine; Honig, Lawrence S.; Marder, Karen; Lemstra, Afina; Rogaeva, Ekaterina; St George-Hyslop, Peter; Londos, Elisabet; Zetterberg, Henrik; Barber, Imelda; Braae, Anne; Brown, Kristelle; Morgan, Kevin; Troakes, Claire; Al-Sarraj, Safa; Lashley, Tammaryn; Holton, Janice; Compta, Yaroslau; Van Deerlin, Vivianna; Serrano, Geidy E.; Beach, Thomas G.; Lesage, Suzanne; Galasko, Douglas; Masliah, Eliezer; Santana, Isabel; Pastor, Pau; Diez-Fairen, Monica; Aguilar, Miquel; Tienari, Pentti J.; Myllykangas, Liisa; Oinas, Minna; Revesz, Tamas; Lees, Andrew; Boeve, Brad F.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Ferman, Tanis J.; Escott-Price, Valentina; Graff-Radford, Neill; Cairns, Nigel J.; Morris, John C.; Pickering-Brown, Stuart; Mann, David; Halliday, Glenda M.; Hardy, John; Trojanowski, John Q.; Dickson, Dennis W.; Singleton, Andrew; Stone, David J.; Guerreiro, Rita; Bras, Jose (2019)
    The role of genetic variability in dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) is now indisputable; however, data regarding copy number variation (CNV) in this disease has been lacking. Here, we used whole-genome genotyping of 1454 DLB cases and 1525 controls to assess copy number variability. We used 2 algorithms to confidently detect CNVs, performed a case-control association analysis, screened for candidate CNVs previously associated with DLB-related diseases, and performed a candidate gene approach to fully explore the data. We identified 5 CNV regions with a significant genome-wide association to DLB; 2 of these were only present in cases and absent from publicly available databases: one of the regions overlapped LAPTM4B, a known lysosomal protein, whereas the other overlapped the NME1 locus and SPAG9. We also identified DLB cases presenting rare CNVs in genes previously associated with DLB or related neurodegenerative diseases, such as SNCA, APP, and MAPT. To our knowledge, this is the first study reporting genome-wide CNVs in a large DLB cohort. These results provide preliminary evidence for the contribution of CNVs in DLB risk. (C) 2019 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Aspelund, Aleksanteri; Antila, Salli; Proulx, Steven T.; Karlsen, Tine Veronica; Karaman, Sinem; Detmar, Michael; Wiig, Helge; Alitalo, Kari (2015)
    The central nervous system (CNS) is considered an organ devoid of lymphatic vasculature. Yet, part of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drains into the cervical lymph nodes (LNs). The mechanism of CSF entry into the LNs has been unclear. Here we report the surprising finding of a lymphatic vessel network in the dura mater of the mouse brain. We show that dural lymphatic vessels absorb CSF from the adjacent subarachnoid space and brain interstitial fluid (ISF) via the glymphatic system. Dural lymphatic vessels transport fluid into deep cervical LNs (dcLNs) via foramina at the base of the skull. In a transgenic mouse model expressing a VEGF-C/D trap and displaying complete aplasia of the dural lymphatic vessels, macromolecule clearance from the brain was attenuated and transport from the subarachnoid space into dcLNs was abrogated. Surprisingly, brain ISF pressure and water content were unaffected. Overall, these findings indicate that the mechanism of CSF flow into the dcLNs is directly via an adjacent dural lymphatic network, which may be important for the clearance of macromolecules from the brain. Importantly, these results call for a reexamination of the role of the lymphatic system in CNS physiology and disease.
  • Maestu, Fernando; Pena, Jose-Maria; Garces, Pilar; Gonzalez, Santiago; Bajo, Ricardo; Bagic, Anto; Cuesta, Pablo; Funke, Michael; Makela, Jyrki P.; Menasalvas, Ernestina; Nakamura, Akinori; Parkkonen, Lauri; Lopez, Maria E.; del Pozo, Francisco; Sudre, Gustavo; Zamrini, Edward; Pekkonen, Eero; Henson, Richard N.; Becker, James T.; Magnetoencephalography Int (2015)
    Synaptic disruption is an early pathological sign of the neurodegeneration of Dementia of the Alzheimer's type (DAT). The changes in network synchronization are evident in patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) at the group level, but there are very few Magnetoencephalography (MEG) studies regarding discrimination at the individual level. In an international multicenter study, we used MEG and functional connectivity metrics to discriminate MCI from normal aging at the individual person level. A labeled sample of features (links) that distinguished MCI patients from controls in a training dataset was used to classify MCI subjects in two testing datasets from four other MEG centers. We identified a pattern of neuronal hypersynchronization in MCI, in which the features that best discriminated MCI were fronto-parietal and interhemispheric links. The hypersynchronization pattern found in the MCI patients was stable across the five different centers, and may be considered an early sign of synaptic disruption and a possible preclinical biomarker for MCI/DAT. (C) 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons. org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).
  • HATICE Grp; FINGER Grp; MAPT DSA Grp; Coley, Nicola; Ngandu, Tiia; Lehtisalo, Jenni; Soininen, Hilkka; Vellas, Bruno; Richard, Edo; Kivipelto, Miia; Andrieu, Sandrine; Laatikainen, Tiina; Strandberg, Timo (2019)
    Introduction: Multidomain interventions, targeting multiple risk factors simultaneously, could be effective dementia prevention strategies, but may be burdensome and not universally acceptable. Methods: We studied adherence rates and predictors in the Finnish Geriatric Intervevntion Study to Prevent Cognitive Impairment and Disability and Multidomain Alzheimer Preventive Trial prevention trials, for all intervention components (separately and simultaneously). Finnish Geriatric Intervevntion Study to Prevent Cognitive Impairment and Disability participants received a 2-year multidomain lifestyle intervention (physical training, cognitive training, nutritional counseling, and cardiovascular monitoring). Multidomain Alzheimer Preventive Trial participants received a 3-year multidomain lifestyle intervention (cognitive training, physical activity counseling, and nutritional counseling) with either an omega-3 supplement or placebo. Results: Adherence decreased with increasing intervention complexity and intensity: it was highest for cardiovascular monitoring, nutritional counseling, and the omega-3 supplement, and lowest for unsupervised computer-based cognitive training. The most consistent baseline predictors of adherence were smoking and depressive symptoms. Discussion: Reducing participant burden, while ensuring that technological tools are suitable for older individuals, maintaining face-to-face contacts, and taking into account participant characteristics may increase adherence in future trials. (C) 2019 the Alzheimer's Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Orme, Tatiana; Hernandez, Dena; Ross, Owen A.; Kun-Rodrigues, Celia; Darwent, Lee; Shepherd, Claire E.; Parkkinen, Laura; Ansorge, Olaf; Clark, Lorraine; Honig, Lawrence S.; Marder, Karen; Lemstra, Afina; Rogaeva, Ekaterina; St. George-Hyslop, Peter; Londos, Elisabet; Zetterberg, Henrik; Morgan, Kevin; Troakes, Claire; Al-Sarraj, Safa; Lashley, Tammaryn; Holton, Janice; Compta, Yaroslau; Van Deerlin, Vivianna; Trojanowski, John Q.; Serrano, Geidy E.; Beach, Thomas G.; Lesage, Suzanne; Galasko, Douglas; Masliah, Eliezer; Santana, Isabel; Pastor, Pau; Tienari, Pentti J.; Myllykangas, Liisa; Oinas, Minna; Revesz, Tamas; Lees, Andrew; Boeve, Brad F.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Ferman, Tanis J.; Escott-Price, Valentina; Graff-Radford, Neill; Cairns, Nigel J.; Morris, John C.; Pickering-Brown, Stuart; Mann, David; Halliday, Glenda; Stone, David J.; Dickson, Dennis W.; Hardy, John; Singleton, Andrew; Guerreiro, Rita; Bras, Jose (2020)
    Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) is a clinically heterogeneous disorder with a substantial burden on healthcare. Despite this, the genetic basis of the disorder is not well defined and its boundaries with other neurodegenerative diseases are unclear. Here, we performed whole exome sequencing of a cohort of 1118 Caucasian DLB patients, and focused on genes causative of monogenic neurodegenerative diseases. We analyzed variants in 60 genes implicated in DLB, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, frontotemporal dementia, and atypical parkinsonian or dementia disorders, in order to determine their frequency in DLB. We focused on variants that have previously been reported as pathogenic, and also describe variants reported as pathogenic which remain of unknown clinical significance, as well as variants associated with strong risk. Rare missense variants of unknown significance were found in APP, CHCHD2, DCTN1, GRN, MAPT, NOTCH3, SQSTM1, TBK1 and TIA1. Additionally, we identified a pathogenic GRN p.Arg493* mutation, potentially adding to the diversity of phenotypes associated with this mutation. The rarity of previously reported pathogenic mutations in this cohort suggests that the genetic overlap of other neurodegenerative diseases with DLB is not substantial. Since it is now clear that genetics plays a role in DLB, these data suggest that other genetic loci play a role in this disease.
  • Brainstorm Consortium; Anttila, Verneri; Bulik-Sullivan, Brendan; Finucane, Hilary K.; Walters, Raymond K.; Bras, Jose; Duncan, Laramie; Escott-Price, Valentina; Falcone, Guido J.; Gormley, Padhraig; Malik, Rainer; Patsopoulos, Nikolaos A.; Ripke, Stephan; Wei, Zhi; Yu, Dongmei; Lee, Phil H.; Turley, Patrick; Grenier-Boley, Benjamin; Chouraki, Vincent; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Berr, Claudine; Letenneur, Luc; Hannequin, Didier; Amouyel, Philippe; Boland, Anne; Deleuze, Jean-Francois; Duron, Emmanuelle; Vardarajan, Badri N.; Reitz, Christiane; Goate, Alison M.; Huentelman, Matthew J.; Kamboh, M. Ilyas; Larson, Eric B.; Rogaeva, Ekaterina; St George-Hyslop, Peter; Hakonarson, Hakon; Kukull, Walter A.; Palta, Priit; Wedenoja, Juho; Artto, Ville; Kaunisto, Mari; Vepsäläinen, Salli; Kurki, Mitja I.; Hämäläinen, Eija; Kaprio, Jaakko; Metspalu, Andres; Keski-Rahkonen, Anna; Raevuori, Anu; Ripatti, Samuli; Lönnqvist, Jouko; Daly, Mark; Palotie, Aarno; Neale, Benjamin M. (2018)
    Disorders of the brain can exhibit considerable epidemiological comorbidity and often share symptoms, provoking debate about their etiologic overlap. We quantified the genetic sharing of 25 brain disorders from genome-wide association studies of 265,218 patients and 784,643 control participants and assessed their relationship to 17 phenotypes from 1,191,588 individuals. Psychiatric disorders share common variant risk, whereas neurological disorders appear more distinct from one another and from the psychiatric disorders. We also identified significant sharing between disorders and a number of brain phenotypes, including cognitive measures. Further, we conducted simulations to explore how statistical power, diagnostic misclassification, and phenotypic heterogeneity affect genetic correlations. These results highlight the importance of common genetic variation as a risk factor for brain disorders and the value of heritability-based methods in understanding their etiology.
  • Rantalainen, Ville; Lahti, Jari; Kajantie, Eero; Tienari, Pentti; Eriksson, Johan G.; Raikkonen, Katri (2019)
    We tested if the epsilon 4 major isoform of the APOE gene and rs405509 and rs440446 promoter and intron-1 polymorphisms predicted risk of any dementia or Alzheimer's disease with diagnoses derived from the Hospital Discharge and Causes of Death Registers in 1453 participants of the Helsinki Birth Cohort Study. We used Cox proportional hazard models adjusted for sex, year of birth, maximum lifetime occupational status and education, and diagnoses of stroke, coronary heart disease, mood disorders, and depressive symptoms. APOE epsilon 4 predicted higher risk of any dementia (hazard ratios >3.68; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.76, 7.70) across all statistical models, and when adjusted for rs405509 and rs440446. The number of minor alleles in rs405509 or rs440446 was not associated with dementia risk (hazard ratios
  • Lee, Crystal ManYing; Woodward, Mark; Batty, G. David; Beiser, Alexa S.; Bell, Steven; Berr, Claudine; Bjertness, Espen; Chalmers, John; Clarke, Robert; Dartigues, Jean-Francois; Davis-Plourde, Kendra; Debette, Stephanie; Di Angelantonio, Emanuele; Feart, Catherine; Frikke-Schmidt, Ruth; Gregson, John; Haan, Mary N.; Hassing, Linda B.; Hayden, Kathleen M.; Hoevenaar-Blom, Marieke P.; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kivimäki, Mika; Lappas, Georgios; Larson, Eric B.; LeBlanc, Erin S.; Lee, Anne; Lui, Li-Yung; van Charante, Eric P. Moll; Ninomiya, Toshiharu; Nordestgaard, Liv Tybjaerg; Ohara, Tomoyuki; Ohkuma, Toshiaki; Palviainen, Teemu; Peres, Karine; Peters, Ruth; Qizilbash, Nawab; Richard, Edo; Rosengren, Annika; Seshadri, Sudha; Shipley, Martin; Singh-Manoux, Archana; Strand, Bjorn Heine; van Gool, Willem A.; Vuoksimaa, Eero; Yaffe, Kristine; Huxley, Rachel R. (2020)
    Uncertainty exists regarding the relation of body size and weight change with dementia risk. As populations continue to age and the global obesity epidemic shows no sign of waning, reliable quantification of such associations is important. We examined the relationship of body mass index, waist circumference, and annual percent weight change with risk of dementia and its subtypes by pooling data from 19 prospective cohort studies and four clinical trials using meta-analysis. Compared with body mass index-defined lower-normal weight (18.5-22.4 kg/m(2)), the risk of all-cause dementia was higher among underweight individuals but lower among those with upper-normal (22.5-24.9 kg/m(2)) levels. Obesity was associated with higher risk in vascular dementia. Similarly, relative to the lowest fifth of waist circumference, those in the highest fifth had nonsignificant higher vascular dementia risk. Weight loss was associated with higher all-cause dementia risk relative to weight maintenance. Weight gain was weakly associated with higher vascular dementia risk. The relationship between body size, weight change, and dementia is complex and exhibits non-linear associations depending on dementia subtype under scrutiny. Weight loss was associated with an elevated risk most likely due to reverse causality and/or pathophysiological changes in the brain, although the latter remains speculative.
  • Torniainen-Holm, Minna; Suvisaari, Jaana; Lindgren, Maija; Härkänen, Tommi; Dickerson, Faith; Yolken, Robert H. (2018)
    Background: Earlier studies have documented an association between cytomegalovirus and cognitive impairment, but results have been inconsistent. Few studies have investigated the association of cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr virus with cognitive decline longitudinally. Our aim was to examine whether cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr virus are associated with cognitive decline, in adults. Method: The study sample is from the Finnish Health 2000 Survey (BRIF8901, n = 7112), which is representative of the Finnish adult population. The sample was followed up after 11 years in the Health 2011 Survey. In addition, persons with dementia were identified from healthcare registers. Results: In the Finnish population aged 30 and over, the seroprevalence of cytomegalovirus was estimated to be 84% and the seroprevalence of Epstein-Barr virus 98%. Seropositivity of the viruses and antibody levels were mostly not associated with cognitive performance. In the middle-aged adult group, cytomegalovirus serointensity was associated with impaired performance in verbal learning. However, the association disappeared when corrected for multiple testing. No interactions between infection and time or between the two infections were significant when corrected for multiple testing. Seropositivity did not predict dementia diagnosis. Conclusions: The results suggest that adult levels of antibodies to cytomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr virus may not be associated with a significant decline in cognitive function or with dementia at population level. (C) 2018 Published by Elsevier Inc.
  • Sabia, Severine; Fayosse, Aurore; Dumurgier, Julien; Schnitzler, Alexis; Empana, Jean-Philippe; Ebmeier, Klaus P.; Dugravot, Aline; Kivimäki, Mika; Singh-Manoux, Archana (2019)
    OBJECTIVES To examine the association between the Life Simple 7 cardiovascular health score at age 50 and incidence of dementia. DESIGN Prospective cohort study. SETTING Civil service departments in London (Whitehall II study; study inception 1985-88). PARTICIPANTS 7899 participants with data on the cardiovascular health score at age 50. EXPOSURES The cardiovascular health score included four behavioural (smoking, diet, physical activity, body mass index) and three biological (fasting glucose, blood cholesterol, blood pressure) metrics, coded on a three point scale (0, 1, 2). The cardiovascular health score was the sum of seven metrics (score range 0-14) and was categorised into poor (scores 0-6), intermediate (7-11), and optimal (12-14) cardiovascular health. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE Incident dementia, identified through linkage to hospital, mental health services, and mortality registers until 2017. RESULTS 347 incident cases of dementia were recorded over a median follow-up of 24.7 years. Compared with an incidence rate of dementia of 3.2 (95% confidence interval 2.5 to 4.0) per 1000 person years among the group with poor cardiovascular health, the absolute rate differences per 1000 person years were -1.5 (95% confidence interval -2.3 to -0.7) for the group with intermediate cardiovascular health and -1.9 (-2.8 to -1.1) for the group with optimal cardiovascular health. Higher cardiovascular health score was associated with a lower risk of dementia (hazard ratio 0.89 (0.85 to 0.95) per 1 point increment in the cardiovascular health score). Similar associations with dementia were observed for the behavioural and biological subscales (hazard ratios per 1 point increment in the subscores 0.87 (0.81 to 0.93) and 0.91 (0.83 to 1.00), respectively). The association between cardiovascular health at age 50 and dementia was also seen in people who remained free of cardiovascular disease over the follow-up (hazard ratio 0.89 (0.84 to 0.95) per 1 point increment in the cardiovascular health score). CONCLUSION Adherence to the Life Simple 7 ideal cardiovascular health recommendations in midlife was associated with a lower risk of dementia later in life.
  • Akbaraly, Tasnime; Sexton, Claire; Zsoldos, Enika; Mahmood, Abda; Filippini, Nicola; Kerleau, Clarisse; Verdier, Jean-Michel; Virtanen, Marianna; Gabelle, Audrey; Ebmeier, Klaus P.; Kivimäki, Mika (2018)
    BACKGROUND: Diet quality is associated with brain aging outcomes. However, few studies have explored in humans the brain structures potentially affected by long-term diet quality. We examined whether cumulative average of the Alternative Healthy Eating Index 2010 (AHEI-2010) score during adult life (an 11-year exposure period) is associated with hippocampal volume. METHODS: Analyses were based on data from 459 participants of the Whitehall II imaging sub-study (mean age [standard deviation] (SD) = 59.6 [5.3] years in 2002-2004, 19.2% women). Multimodal magnetic resonance imaging examination was performed at the end of follow-up (2015-2016). Structural images were acquired using a high-resolution 3-dimensional T1-weighted sequence and processed with Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Brain Software Library (FSL) tools. An automated model-based segmentation and registration tool was applied to extract hippocampal volumes. RESULTS: Higher AHEI-2010 cumulative average score (reflecting long-term healthy diet quality) was associated with a larger total hippocampal volume. For each 1 SD (SD = 8.7 points) increment in AHEI-2010 score, an increase of 92.5 mm(3) (standard error = 42.0 mm(3)) in total hippocampal volume was observed. This association was independent of sociodemographic factors, smoking habits, physical activity, cardiometabolic health factors, cognitive impairment, and depressive symptoms, and was more pronounced in the left hippocampus than in the right hippocampus. Of the AHEI-2010 components, no or light alcohol consumption was independently associated with larger hippocampal volume. CONCLUSIONS: Higher long-term AHEI-2010 scores were associated with larger hippocampal volume. Accounting for the importance of hippocampal structures in several neuropsychiatric diseases, our findings reaffirm the need to consider adherence to healthy dietary recommendation in multi-interventional programs to promote healthy brain aging. (C) 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc.
  • Lehtisalo, J.; Lindstrom, J.; Ngandu, T.; Kivipelto, M.; Ahtiluoto, S.; Ilanne-Parikka, P.; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, S.; Eriksson, J. G.; Uusitupa, M.; Tuomilehto, J.; Luchsinger, J.; Finnish Diabet Prevention Study DP (2016)
    Objectives: To investigate associations of long-term nutrient intake, physical activity and obesity with later cognitive function among the participants in the Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study, in which a lifestyle intervention was successful in diabetes prevention. Design: An active lifestyle intervention phase during middle age (mean duration 4 years) and extended follow-up (additional 9 years) with annual lifestyle measurements, followed by an ancillary cognition assessment. Setting: 5 research centers in Finland. Participants: Of the 522 middle-aged, overweight participants with impaired glucose tolerance recruited to the study, 364 (70%) participated in the cognition assessment (mean age 68 years). Measurements: A cognitive assessment was executed with the CERAD test battery and the Trail Making Test A on average 13 years after baseline. Lifestyle measurements included annual clinical measurements, food records, and exercise questionnaires during both the intervention and follow-up phase. Results: Lower intake of total fat (p=0.021) and saturated fatty acids (p=0.010), and frequent physical activity (p=0.040) during the whole study period were associated with better cognitive performance. Higher BMI (p= 0.012) and waist circumference (p= 0.012) were also associated with worse performance, but weight reduction prior to the cognition assessment predicted worse performance as well (decrease vs. increase, p= 0.008 for BMI and p= 0.002 for waist). Conclusions: Long-term dietary fat intake, BMI, and waist circumference have an inverse association with cognitive function in later life among people with IGT. However, decreases in BMI and waist prior to cognitive assessment are associated with worse cognitive performance, which could be explained by reverse causality.
  • Sabia, Severine; Fayosse, Aurore; Dumurgier, Julien; van Hees, Vincent T.; Paquet, Claire; Sommerlad, Andrew; Kivimäki, Mika; Dugravot, Aline; Singh-Manoux, Archana (2021)
    Sleep dysregulation is a feature of dementia but it remains unclear whether sleep duration prior to old age is associated with dementia incidence. Using data from 7959 participants of the Whitehall II study, we examined the association between sleep duration and incidence of dementia (521 diagnosed cases) using a 25-year follow-up. Here we report higher dementia risk associated with a sleep duration of six hours or less at age 50 and 60, compared with a normal (7h) sleep duration, although this was imprecisely estimated for sleep duration at age 70 (hazard ratios (HR) 1.22 (95% confidence interval 1.01-1.48), 1.37 (1.10-1.72), and 1.24 (0.98-1.57), respectively). Persistent short sleep duration at age 50, 60, and 70 compared to persistent normal sleep duration was also associated with a 30% increased dementia risk independently of sociodemographic, behavioural, cardiometabolic, and mental health factors. These findings suggest that short sleep duration in midlife is associated with an increased risk of late-onset dementia.
  • Stephen, Ruth; Liu, Yawu; Ngandu, Tiia; Rinne, Juha O.; Kemppainen, Nina; Parkkola, Riitta; Laatikainen, Tiina; Paajanen, Teemu; Hanninen, Tuomo; Strandberg, Timo; Antikainen, Riitta; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Keinanen Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka; Vanninen, Ritva; Helisalmi, Seppo; Levalahti, Esko; Kivipelto, Miia; Soininen, Hilkka; Solomon, Alina (2017)
    Background: CAIDE Dementia Risk Score is the first validated tool for estimating dementia risk based on a midlife risk profile. Objectives: This observational study investigated longitudinal associations of CAIDE Dementia Risk Score with brain MRI, amyloid burden evaluated with PIB-PET, and detailed cognition measures. Methods: FINGER participants were at-risk elderly without dementia. CAIDE Risk Score was calculated using data from previous national surveys (mean age 52.4 years). In connection to baseline FINGER visit (on average 17.6 years later, mean age 70.1 years), 132 participants underwent MRI scans, and 48 underwent PIB-PET scans. All 1,260 participants were cognitively assessed (Neuropsychological Test Battery, NTB). Neuroimaging assessments included brain cortical thickness and volumes (Freesurfer 5.0.3), visually rated medial temporal atrophy (MTA), white matter lesions (WML), and amyloid accumulation. Results: Higher CAIDE Dementia Risk Score was related to more pronounced deep WML (OR 1.22, 95% CI 1.05-1.43), lower total gray matter (beta- coefficient -0.29, p = 0.001) and hippocampal volume (beta- coefficient -0.28, p = 0.003), lower cortical thickness (beta-coefficient -0.19, p = 0.042), and poorer cognition (beta-coefficients -0.31 for total NTB score, -0.25 for executive functioning, -0.33 for processing speed, and -0.20 for memory, all p <0.001). Higher CAIDE Dementia Risk Score including APOE genotype was additionally related to more pronounced MTA (OR 1.15,95% CI 1.00-1.30). No associations were found with periventricular WML or amyloid accumulation. Conclusions: The CAIDE Dementia Risk Score was related to indicators of cerebrovascular changes and neurodegeneration on MRI, and cognition. The lack of association with brain amyloid accumulation needs to be verified in studies with larger sample sizes.
  • Oksanen, Minna; Lehtonen, Sarka; Jaronen, Merja; Goldsteins, Gundars; Hämäläinen, Riikka H.; Koistinaho, Jari (2019)
    Astrocytes are the most abundant cell type in the brain. They were long considered only as passive support for neuronal cells. However, recent data have revealed many active roles for these cells both in maintenance of the normal physiological homeostasis in the brain as well as in neurodegeneration and disease. Moreover, human astrocytes have been found to be much more complex than their rodent counterparts, and to date, astrocytes are known to actively participate in a multitude of processes such as neurotransmitter uptake and recycling, gliotransmitter release, neuroenergetics, inflammation, modulation of synaptic activity, ionic balance, maintenance of the blood–brain barrier, and many other crucial functions of the brain. This review focuses on the role of astrocytes in human neurodegenerative disease and the potential of the novel stem cell-based platforms in modeling astrocytic functions in health and in disease.
  • Wu, Ying-Chieh; Sonninen, Tuuli-Maria; Peltonen, Sanni; Koistinaho, Jari; Lehtonen, Sarka (2021)
    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) regulates the delivery of oxygen and important nutrients to the brain through active and passive transport and prevents neurotoxins from entering the brain. It also has a clearance function and removes carbon dioxide and toxic metabolites from the central nervous system (CNS). Several drugs are unable to cross the BBB and enter the CNS, adding complexity to drug screens targeting brain disorders. A well-functioning BBB is essential for maintaining healthy brain tissue, and a malfunction of the BBB, linked to its permeability, results in toxins and immune cells entering the CNS. This impairment is associated with a variety of neurological diseases, including Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. Here, we summarize current knowledge about the BBB in neurodegenerative diseases. Furthermore, we focus on recent progress of using human-induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived models to study the BBB. We review the potential of novel stem cell-based platforms in modeling the BBB and address advances and key challenges of using stem cell technology in modeling the human BBB. Finally, we highlight future directions in this area.
  • FINGER Study Grp; Stephen, Ruth; Liu, Yawu; Ngandu, Tiia; Antikainen, Riitta; Hulkkonen, Juha; Koikkalainen, Juha; Levälahti, Esko; Parkkola, Riitta; Pippola, Pauliina; Rinne, Juha; Strandberg, Timo; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Vanninen, Ritva; Kivipelto, Miia; Soininen, Hilkka; Solomon, Alina (2019)
    BackgroundThe Finnish Geriatric Intervention Study to Prevent Cognitive Impairment and Disability (FINGER) was a multicenter randomized controlled trial that reported beneficial effects on cognition for a 2-year multimodal intervention (diet, exercise, cognitive training, vascular risk monitoring) versus control (general health advice). This study reports exploratory analyses of brain MRI measures.MethodsFINGER targeted 1260 older individuals from the general Finnish population. Participants were 60-77years old, at increased risk for dementia but without dementia/substantial cognitive impairment. Brain MRI scans were available for 132 participants (68 intervention, 64 control) at baseline and 112 participants (59 intervention, 53 control) at 2years. MRI measures included regional brain volumes, cortical thickness, and white matter lesion (WML) volume. Cognition was assessed at baseline and 1- and 2-year visits using a comprehensive neuropsychological test battery. We investigated the (1) differences between the intervention and control groups in change in MRI outcomes (FreeSurfer 5.3) and (2) post hoc sub-group analyses of intervention effects on cognition in participants with more versus less pronounced structural brain changes at baseline (mixed-effects regression models, Stata 12).ResultsNo significant differences between the intervention and control groups were found on the changes in MRI measures. Beneficial intervention effects on processing speed were more pronounced in individuals with higher baseline cortical thickness in Alzheimer's disease signature areas (composite measure of entorhinal, inferior and middle temporal, and fusiform regions). The randomization groupxtimexcortical thickness interaction coefficient was 0.198 (p=0.021). A similar trend was observed for higher hippocampal volume (groupxtimexhippocampus volume interaction coefficient 0.1149, p=0.085).ConclusionsThe FINGER MRI exploratory sub-study did not show significant differences between the intervention and control groups on changes in regional brain volumes, regional cortical thicknesses, or WML volume after 2years in at-risk elderly without substantial impairment. The cognitive benefits on processing speed of the FINGER intervention may be more pronounced in individuals with fewer structural brain changes on MRI at baseline. This suggests that preventive strategies may be more effective if started early, before the occurrence of more pronounced structural brain changes.Trial registrationClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01041989. Registered January 5, 2010.
  • Kaivola, Karri; Kiviharju, Anna; Jansson, Lilja; Rantalainen, Ville; Eriksson, Johan G.; Strandberg, Timo E.; Laaksovirta, Hannu; Renton, Alan E; Traynor, Bryan J.; Myllykangas, Liisa; Tienari, Pentti (2019)
    The hexanucleotide repeat expansion in C9orf72 is a common cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/frontotemporal dementia and also rarely found in other psychiatric and neurodegenerative conditions. Alleles with >30 repeats are often considered an expansion, but the pathogenic repeat length threshold is still unclear. It is also unclear whether intermediate repeat length alleles (often defined either as 7-30 or 20-30 repeats) have clinically significant effects. We determined the C9orf72 repeat length distribution in 3142 older Finns (aged 60-104 years). The longest nonexpanded allele was 45 repeats. We found 7-45 repeats in 1036/3142 (33%) individuals, 20-45 repeats in 56/3142 (1.8%), 30-45 repeats in 12/3142 (0.38%), and expansion (>45 repeats) in 6/3142 (0.19%). There was no apparent clustering of neurodegenerative or psychiatric diseases in individuals with 30-45 repeats indicating that 30-45 repeats are not pathogenic. None of the 6 expansion carriers had a diagnosis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/frontotemporal dementia but 4 had a diagnosis of a neurodegenerative or psychiatric disease. Intermediate length alleles (categorized as 7-45 and 20-45 repeats) did not associate with Alzheimer's disease or cognitive impairment. (C) 2019 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc.
  • Pietrucha-Dutczak, Marita; Smedowski, Adrian; Liu, Xiaonan; Matuszek, Iwona; Varjosalo, Markku; Lewin-Kowalik, Joanna (2017)
    Glaucoma is thought to be the main cause of severe visual impairment or permanent loss of vision. Current therapeutic strategies are not sufficient to protect against glaucoma. Thus, new therapies and potential novel therapeutic targets must be developed to achieve progress in the treatment of this insidious disease. This study was undertaken to verify whether the time of administration of an extract from predegenerated rat sciatic nerves as well as exposure time of this extract onto retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) influences the survival of RGCs in a rat glaucoma model. We have demonstrated that extract obtained from the predegenerated sciatic nerves protects RGCs in a rat glaucoma model. The neuroprotective effect depends mostly on the time of administration of the extract and less clearly on the time of exposure to the extract and is associated with stimulation of endogenous BDNF expression both in RGCs and glial cells. The 14th day following glaucoma induction represents a therapeutic window for effective treatment in a glaucoma model. Mass Spectrometry analysis demonstrated that metallothionein 2 (MT2) may be a key molecule responsible for neuroprotective effects on RGC survival.
  • Liang, Yajun; Ngandu, Tiia; Laatikainen, Tiina; Soininen, Hilkka; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Kivipelto, Miia; Qiu, Chengxuan (2020)
    Background Very few studies have explored the patterns of cardiovascular health (CVH) metrics in midlife and late life in relation to risk of dementia. We examined the associations of composite CVH metrics from midlife to late life with risk of incident dementia. Methods and findings This cohort study included 1,449 participants from the Finnish Cardiovascular Risk Factors, Aging, and Dementia (CAIDE) study, who were followed from midlife (baseline from1972 to 1987; mean age 50.4 years; 62.1% female) to late life (1998), and then 744 dementia-free survivors were followed further into late life (2005 to 2008). We defined and scored global CVH metrics based on 6 of the 7 components (i.e., smoking, physical activity, and body mass index [BMI] as behavioral CVH metrics; fasting plasma glucose, total cholesterol, and blood pressure as biological CVH metrics) following the modified American Heart Association (AHA)'s recommendations. Then, the composite global, behavioral, and biological CVH metrics were categorized into poor, intermediate, and ideal levels. Dementia was diagnosed following the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) criteria. Data were analyzed with Cox proportional hazards and the Fine and Gray competing risk regression models. During the follow-up examinations, dementia was diagnosed in 61 persons in 1998 and additional 47 persons in 2005 to 2008. The fully adjusted hazard ratio (HR) of dementia was 0.71 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.43, 1.16; p = 0.174) and 0.52 (0.29, 0.93; p = 0.027) for midlife intermediate and ideal levels (versus poor level) of global CVH metrics, respectively; the corresponding figures for late-life global CVH metrics were 0.60 (0.22, 1.69; p = 0.338) and 0.91 (0.34, 2.41; p = 0.850). Compared with poor global CVH metrics in both midlife and late life, the fully adjusted HR of dementia was 0.25 (95% CI: 0.08, 0.86; p = 0.028) for people with intermediate global CVH metrics in both midlife and late life and 0.14 (0.02, 0.76; p = 0.024) for those with midlife ideal and late-life intermediate global CVH metrics. Having an intermediate or ideal level of behavioral CVH in both midlife and late life (versus poor level in both midlife and late life) was significantly associated with a lower dementia risk (HR range: 0.03 to 0.26; p <0.05), whereas people with midlife intermediate and late-life ideal biological CVH metrics had a significantly increased risk of dementia (p = 0.031). Major limitations of this study include the lack of data on diet and midlife plasma glucose, high rate of attrition, as well as the limited power for certain subgroup analyses. Conclusions In this study, we observed that having the ideal CVH metrics, and ideal behavioral CVH metrics in particular, from midlife onwards is associated with a reduced risk of dementia as compared with people having poor CVH metrics. Maintaining life-long health behaviors may be crucial to reduce late-life risk of dementia. Author summary Why was this study done? Dementia is a global public health problem, but there is currently no cure or a disease-modifying therapy for dementia. Simulation studies suggested that interventions targeting modifiable risk factors (e.g., cardiovascular factors) could prevent up to one-third of dementia cases. A better understanding of the life-long cardiovascular health (CVH) metrics and risk of dementia may facilitate the development of optimal intervention strategies. What did the researchers do and find? We examined the associations of CVH metrics in midlife and late life with risk of incident dementia in a population-based cohort of 1,449 participants in Finland followed for around 30 years. Compared with poor CVH metrics, the ideal global and behavioral CVH metrics in midlife were associated with a reduced risk of dementia, whereas the ideal biological CVH metrics in late life appeared to be associated with an increased risk of dementia. Having an intermediate or ideal level of behavioral CVH metrics from midlife onwards was associated with a late-life reduced risk of dementia. What do these findings mean? The association of ideal global CVH metrics with a reduced dementia risk disappeared from midlife to old age, driven largely by the age-varying association between biological CVH metrics and risk of dementia. Maintaining a life-long optimal level of CVH metrics, especially behavioral health metrics, may reduce late-life risk of dementia. The association of late-life ideal biological CVH metrics with an increased risk of dementia may largely reflect the potential of reverse causality.