Browsing by Subject "AMERICAN-HEART-ASSOCIATION"

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  • Pekkarinen, Pirkka T.; Bäcklund, Minna; Efendijev, Ilmar; Raj, Rahul; Folger, Daniel; Litonius, Erik; Laitio, Ruut; Bendel, Stepani; Hoppu, Sanna; Ala-Kokko, Tero; Reinikainen, Matti; Skrifvars, Markus B. (2019)
    BackgroundOrgan dysfunction is common after cardiac arrest and associated with worse short-term outcome, but its impact on long-term outcome and treatment costs is unknown.MethodsWe used nationwide registry data from the intensive care units (ICU) of the five Finnish university hospitals to evaluate the association of 24-h extracerebral Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (24h-EC-SOFA) score with 1-year survival and healthcare-associated costs after cardiac arrest. We included adult cardiac arrest patients treated in the participating ICUs between January 1, 2003, and December 31, 2013. We acquired the confirmed date of death from the Finnish Population Register Centre database and gross 1-year healthcare-associated costs from the hospital billing records and the database of the Finnish Social Insurance Institution.ResultsA total of 5814 patients were included in the study, and 2401 were alive 1year after cardiac arrest. Median (interquartile range (IQR)) 24h-EC-SOFA score was 6 (5-8) in 1-year survivors and 7 (5-10) in non-survivors. In multivariate regression analysis, adjusting for age and prior independency in self-care, the 24h-EC-SOFA score had an odds ratio (OR) of 1.16 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.14-1.18) per point for 1-year mortality.Median (IQR) healthcare-associated costs in the year after cardiac arrest were Euro47,000 (Euro28,000-75,000) in 1-year survivors and Euro12,000 (Euro6600-25,000) in non-survivors. In a multivariate linear regression model adjusting for age and prior independency in self-care, an increase of one point in the 24h-EC-SOFA score was associated with an increase of Euro170 (95% CI Euro150-190) in the cost per day alive in the year after cardiac arrest. In the same model, an increase of one point in the 24h-EC-SOFA score was associated with an increase of Euro4400 (95% CI Euro3300-5500) in the total healthcare-associated costs in 1-year survivors.ConclusionsExtracerebral organ dysfunction is associated with long-term outcome and gross healthcare-associated costs of ICU-treated cardiac arrest patients. It should be considered when assessing interventions to improve outcomes and optimize the use of resources in these patients.
  • COSCA collaborators; Haywood, Kirstie; Castren, Maaret (2018)
    Cardiac arrest effectiveness trials have traditionally reported outcomes that focus on survival. A lack of consistency in outcome reporting between trials limits the opportunities to pool results for meta-analysis. The COSCA initiative (Core Outcome Set for Cardiac Arrest), a partnership between patients, their partners, clinicians, research scientists, and the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation, sought to develop a consensus core outcome set for cardiac arrest for effectiveness trials. Core outcome sets are primarily intended for large, randomised clinical effectiveness trials (sometimes referred to as pragmatic trials or phase III/IV trials) rather than for pilot or efficacy studies. A systematic review of the literature combined with qualitative interviews among cardiac arrest survivors was used to generate a list of potential outcome domains. This list was prioritised through a Delphi process, which involved clinicians, patients, and their relatives/partners. An international advisory panel narrowed these down to 3 core domains by debate that led to consensus. The writing group refined recommendations for when these outcomes should be measured and further characterised relevant measurement tools. Consensus emerged that a core outcome set for reporting on effectiveness studies of cardiac arrest (COSCA) in adults should include survival, neurological function, and health-related quality of life. This should be reported as survival status and modified Rankin scale score at hospital discharge, at 30 days, or both. Health-related quality of life should be measured with >= 1 tools from Health Utilities Index version 3, Short-Form 36-Item Health Survey, and EuroQol 5D-5L at 90 days and at periodic intervals up to 1 year after cardiac arrest, if resources allow. (C) 2018 European Resuscitation Council and American Heart Association, Inc. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
  • COSCA collaborators; Haywood, Kirstie; Castren, Maaret (2018)
    Cardiac arrest effectiveness trials have traditionally reported outcomes that focus on survival. A lack of consistency in outcome reporting between trials limits the opportunities to pool results for meta-analysis. The COSCA initiative (Core Outcome Set for Cardiac Arrest), a partnership between patients, their partners, clinicians, research scientists, and the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation, sought to develop a consensus core outcome set for cardiac arrest for effectiveness trials. Core outcome sets are primarily intended for large, randomized clinical effectiveness trials (sometimes referred to as pragmatic trials or phase III/IV trials) rather than for pilot or efficacy studies. A systematic review of the literature combined with qualitative interviews among cardiac arrest survivors was used to generate a list of potential outcome domains. This list was prioritized through a Delphi process, which involved clinicians, patients, and their relatives/partners. An international advisory panel narrowed these down to 3 core domains by debate that led to consensus. The writing group refined recommendations for when these outcomes should be measured and further characterized relevant measurement tools. Consensus emerged that a core outcome set for reporting on effectiveness studies of cardiac arrest (COSCA) in adults should include survival, neurological function, and health-related quality of life. This should be reported as survival status and modified Rankin scale score at hospital discharge, at 30 days, or both. Health-related quality of life should be measured with >= 1 tools from Health Utilities Index version 3, Short-Form 36-Item Health Survey, and EuroQol 5D-5L at 90 days and at periodic intervals up to 1 year after cardiac arrest, if resources allow.
  • Irfan, Furqan B.; Bhutta, Zain Ali; Castren, Maaret; Straney, Lahn; Djarv, Therese; Tariq, Tooba; Thomas, Stephen Hodges; Alinier, Guillaume; Al Shaikh, Loua; Owen, Robert Campbell; Al Suwaidi, Jassim; Shuaib, Ashfaq; Singh, Rajvir; Cameron, Peter Alistair (2016)
    Background: Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) studies from the Middle East and Asian region are limited. This study describes the epidemiology, emergency health services, and outcomes of OHCA in Qatar. Methods: This was a prospective nationwide population-based observational study on OHCA patients in Qatar according to Utstein style guidelines, from June 2012 to May 2013. Data was collected from various sources; the national emergency medical service, 4 emergency departments, and 8 public hospitals. Results: The annual crude incidence of presumed cardiac OHCA attended by EMS was 23.5 per 100,000. The age sex standardized incidence was 87.8 per 100,000 population. Of the 447 OHCA patients included in the final analysis, most were male (n = 360, 80.5%) with median age of 51 years (IQR = 39-66). Frequently observed nationalities were Qatari (n = 89, 19.9%), Indian (n = 74, 16.6%) and Nepalese (n = 52, 11.6%). Bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was carried out in 92 (20.6%) OHCA patients. Survival rate was 8.1% (n = 36) and multivariable logistic regression indicated that initial shockable rhythm (OR 13.4, 95% CI 5.4-33.3, p = 0.001) was associated with higher odds of survival while male gender (OR 0.27, 95% CI 0.1-0.8, p = 0.01) and advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) (OR 0.15, 95% CI 0.04-0.5, p = 0.02) were associated with lower odds of survival. Conclusions: Standardized incidence and survival rates were comparable to Western countries. Although expatriates comprise more than 80% of the population, Qataris contributed 20% of the total cardiac arrests observed. There are significant opportunities to improve outcomes, including community-based CPR and defibrillation training. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • Pasquier, Mathieu; Hugli, Olivier; Paal, Peter; Darocha, Tomasz; Blancher, Marc; Husby, Paul; Silfvast, Tom; Carron, Pierre-Nicolas; Rousson, Valentin (2018)
    Aims: Currently, the decision to initiate extracorporeal life support for patients who suffer cardiac arrest due to accidental hypothermia is essentially based on serum potassium level. Our goal was to build a prediction score in order to determine the probability of survival following rewarming of hypothermic arrested patients based on several covariates available at admission. Methods: We included consecutive hypothermic arrested patients who underwent rewarming with extracorporeal life support. The sample comprised 237 patients identified through the literature from 18 studies, and 49 additional patients obtained from hospital data collection. We considered nine potential predictors of survival: age; sex; core temperature; serum potassium level; mechanism of hypothermia; cardiac rhythm at admission; witnessed cardiac arrest, rewarming method and cardiopulmonary resuscitation duration prior to the initiation of extracorporeal life support. The primary outcome parameter was survival to hospital discharge. Results: Overall, 106 of the 286 included patients survived (37%; 95% CI: 32-43%), most (84%) with a good neurological outcome. The final score included the following variables: age, sex, core temperature at admission, serum potassium level, mechanism of cooling, and cardiopulmonary resuscitation duration. The corresponding area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.895 (95% CI: 0.859-0.931) compared to 0.774 (95% CI: 0.720-0.828) when based on serum potassium level alone. Conclusions: In this large retrospective study we found that our score was superior to dichotomous triage based on serum potassium level in assessing which hypothermic patients in cardiac arrest would benefit from extracorporeal life support. External validation of our findings is required.
  • Kyrklund, Mikael; Kummu, Outi; Kankaanpaa, Jari; Akhi, Ramin; Nissinen, Antti; Turunen, S. Pauliina; Pussinen, Pirkko; Wang, Chunguang; Hörkkö, Sohvi (2018)
    Treatment of periodontitis has beneficial effects on systemic inflammation markers that relate to progression of atherosclerosis. We aimed to investigate whether immunization with A hemagglutinin domain (Rgp44) of Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg), a major etiologic agent of periodontitis, would lead to an antibody response cross-reacting with oxidized low-density lipoprotein (OxLDL) and how it would affect the progression of atherosclerosis in low-density lipoprotein receptor-deficient (LDLR-/-) mice. The data revealed a prominent IgM but not IgG response to malondialdehyde-acetaldehyde modified LDL (MAA-LDL) after Rgp44 and Pg immunizations, implying that Rgp44/Pgand MAA adducts may share cross-reactive epitopes that prompt IgM antibody production and consequently confer atheroprotection. A significant negative association was observed between atherosclerotic lesion and plasma IgA to Rgp44 in Rgp44 immunized mice, supporting further the anti-atherogenic effect of Rgp44 immunization. Plasma IgA levels to Rgp44 and to Pg in both Rgp44-and Pg-immunized mice were significantly higher than those in saline control, suggesting that IgA to Rgp44 could be a surrogate marker of immunization in Pg-immunized mice. Distinct antibody responses in plasma IgA levels to MAA-LDL, to Pg lipopolysaccharides (Pg-LPS), and to phosphocholine (PCho) were observed after Rgp44 and Pg immunizations, indicating that different immunogenic components between Rpg44 and Pg may behave differently in regard of their roles in the development of atherosclerosis. Immunization with Rgp44 also displayed atheroprotective features in modulation of plaque size through association with plasma levels of IL-1 alpha whereas whole Pg bacteria achieved through regulation of antiinflammatory cytokine levels of IL-5 and IL-10. The present study may contribute to refining therapeutic approaches aiming to modulate immune responses and inflammatory/antiinflammatory processes in atherosclerosis.
  • Dyson, Kylie; Brown, Siobhan P.; May, Susanne; Smith, Karen; Koster, Rudolph W.; Beesems, Stefanie G.; Kuisma, Markku; Salo, Ari; Finn, Judith; Sterz, Fritz; Nuernberger, Alexander; Morrison, Laurie J.; Olasveengen, Theresa M.; Callaway, Clifton W.; Shin, Sang Do; Gräsner, Jan-Thorsten; Daya, Mohamud; Ma, Matthew Huei-Ming; Herlitz, Johan; Stromsöe, Anneli; Aufderheide, Tom P.; Masterson, Siobhan; Wang, Henry; Christenson, Jim; Stiell, Ian; Vilke, Gary M.; Idris, Ahamed; Nishiyama, Chika; Iwami, Taku; Nichol, Graham (2019)
    Introduction: Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) survival varies greatly between communities. The Utstein template was developed and promulgated to improve the comparability of OHCA outcome reports, but it has undergone limited empiric validation. We sought to assess how much of the variation in OHCA survival between emergency medical services (EMS) across the globe is explained by differences in the Utstein factors. We also assessed how accurately the Utstein factors predict OHCA survival. Methods: We performed a retrospective analysis of patient-level prospectively collected data from 12 OHCA registries from 12 countries for the period 1 Jan 2006 through 31 Dec 2011. We used generalized linear mixed models to examine the variation in survival between EMS agencies (n = 232). Results: Twelve registries contributed 86,759 cases. Patient arrest characteristics, EMS treatment and patient outcomes varied across registries. Overall survival to hospital discharge was 10% (range, 6% to 22%). Overall survival with Cerebral Performance Category of 1 or 2 (available for 8/12 registries) was 8%(range, 2% to 20%). The area-under-the-curve for the Utstein model was 0.85 (Wald CI: 0.85-0.85). The Utstein factors explained 51% of the EMS agency variation in OHCA survival. Conclusions: The Utstein factors explained 51%. of the variation in survival to hospital discharge among multiple large geographically separate EMS agencies. This suggests that quality improvement and public health efforts should continue to target modifiable Utstein factors to improve OHCA survival. Further study is required to identify the reasons for the variation that is incompletely understood.
  • Hytonen, Jarkko P.; Taavitsainen, Jouni; Laitinen, Johannes T. T.; Partanen, Anna; Alitalo, Kari; Leppänen, Olli; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo (2018)
    Background: Antiproliferative drugs in drug eluting stents (DES) are associated with complications due to impaired re-endothelialization. Additionally, adventitial neovascularization has been suggested to contribute to in-stent restenosis (ISR). Since Vascular Endothelial Growth Factors (VEGFs) are the key mediators of angiogenesis, we investigated feasibility and efficacy of local gene therapy for ISR utilizing soluble decoy VEGF receptors to reduce biological activity of adventitial VEGFs. Method Sixty-nine adult WHHL rabbit aortas were subjected to endothelial denudation. Six weeks later catheter-mediated local intramural infusion of 1.5x10e10 pfu adenoviruses encoding soluble VEGF Receptor-1 (sVEGFR1), sVEGFR2, sVEGFR3 or control LacZ and bare metal stent implantation were performed in the same aortic segment. Marker protein expression was assessed at 6d in LacZ cohort. Immunohistochemistry, morphometrical analyses and angiography were performed at d14, d42 and d90. Results: Transgene expression was localized to adventitia. All decoy receptors reduced the size of vasa-vasorum at 14d, AdsVEGFR2 animals also had reduced density of adventitial vasa-vasorum, whereas AdsVEGFR3 increased the density of vasa-vasorum. At d42, AdsVEGFR1 and AdsVEGFR2 reduced ISR (15.7 +/- 6.9% stenosis, P <0.01 and 16.5 +/- 2.7%, P <0.05, respectively) vs. controls (28.3 +/- 7.6%). Moreover, AdsVEGFR-3 treatment led to a non-significant trend in the reduction of adventitial lymphatics at all time points and these animals had significantly more advanced neointimal atherosclerosis at 14d and 42d vs. control animals. Conclusions: Targeting adventitial neovascularization using sVEGFR1 and sVEGFR2 is a novel strategy to reduce ISR. The therapeutic effects dissipate at late follow up following short expression profile of adenoviral vectors. However, inhibition of VEGFR3 signaling accelerates neoatherosclerosis.
  • Würtz, Peter; Wang, Qin; Kangas, Antti J.; Richmond, Rebecca C.; Skarp, Joni; Tiainen, Mika; Tynkkynen, Tuulia; Soininen, Pasi; Havulinna, Aki S.; Kaakinen, Marika; Viikari, Jorma S.; Savolainen, Markku J.; Kahonen, Mika; Lehtimaki, Terho; Mannisto, Satu; Blankenberg, Stefan; Zeller, Tanja; Laitinen, Jaana; Pouta, Anneli; Mantyselka, Pekka; Vanhala, Mauno; Elliott, Paul; Pietilainen, Kirsi H.; Ripatti, Samuli; Salomaa, Veikko; Raitakari, Olli T.; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Smith, George Davey; Ala-Korpela, Mika (2014)
  • Kiguchi, Tekeyuki; Okubo, Masashi; Nishiyama, Chika; Maconochie, Ian; Ong, Marcus Eng Hock; Kern, Karl B.; Wyckoff, Myra H.; McNally, Bryan; Christensen, Erika; Tjelmeland, Ingvild; Herlitz, Johan; Perkins, Gavin D.; Booth, Scott; Finn, Judith; Shahidah, Nur; Shin, Sang Do; Bobrow, Bentley J.; Morrison, Laurie J.; Salo, Ari; Baldi, Enrico; Burkart, Roman; Lin, Chih-Hao; Jouven, Xavier; Soar, Jasmeet; Nolan, Jerry P.; Iwami, Taku (2020)
    Background Since development of the Utstein style recommendations for the uniform reporting of cardiac arrest, increasing numbers of national and regional out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) registries have been established worldwide. The International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR) created the Research and Registries Working Group and aimed to systematically report data collected from these registries. Methods We conducted two surveys of voluntarily participating national and regional registries. The first survey aimed to identify which core elements of the current Utstein style for OHCA were collected by each registry. The second survey collected descriptive summary data from each registry. We chose the data collected for the second survey based on the availability of core elements identified by the first survey. Results Seven national and four regional registries were included in the first survey and nine national and seven regional registries in the second survey. The estimated annual incidence of emergency medical services (EMS)-treated OHCA was 30.0 to 97.1 individuals per 100,000 population. The combined data showed the median age varied from 64 to 79 years and more than half were male in all 16 registries. The provision of bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and bystander automated external defibrillator (AED) use was 19.1% to 79.0% in all registries and 2.0% to 37.4% among 11 registries, respectively. Survival to hospital discharge or 30-day survival after EMS-treated OHCA was 3.1% to 20.4% across all registries. Favourable neurological outcome at hospital discharge or 30 days after EMS-treated OHCA was 2.8% to 18.2%. Survival to hospital discharge or 30-day survival after bystander witnessed shockable OHCA ranged from 11.7% to 47.4% and favourable neurological outcome from 9.9% to 33.3%. Conclusion This report from ILCOR describes data on systems of care and outcomes following OHCA from nine national and seven regional registries across the world. We found variation in reported survival outcomes and other core elements of the current Utstein style recommendations for OHCA across nations and regions.
  • Efendijev, Ilmar; Folger, Daniel; Raj, Rahul; Reinikainen, Matti; Pekkarinen, Pirkka T.; Litonius, Erik; Skrifvars, Markus B. (2018)
    Background: Despite the significant socioeconomic burden associated with cardiac arrest (CA), data on CA patients' long-term outcome and healthcare-associated costs are limited. The aim of this study was to determine one-year survival, neurological outcome and healthcare-associated costs for ICU-treated CA patients. Methods: This is a single-centre retrospective study on adult CA patients treated in Finnish tertiary hospital's ICUs between 2005 and 2013. Patients' personal identification number was used to crosslink data between several nationwide databases in order to obtain data on one-year survival, neurological outcome, and healthcare-associated costs. Healthcare-associated costs were calculated for every patient stratified by cardiac arrest location (OHCA = out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, IHCA = all in-hospital cardiac arrest, ICU-CA = in-ICU cardiac arrest) and initial cardiac rhythm. Cost-effectiveness was estimated by dividing total healthcare-associated costs for all patients from the respective group by the number of survivors and survivors with favourable neurological outcome. Results: The study population included 1,024 ICU-treated CA patients. The sum of costs for all patients was (sic)50,847,540. At one-year after CA, 58% of OHCAs, 44% of IHCAs, and 39% of ICU-CAs were alive. Of one-year survivors 97% of OHCAs, 88% of IHCAs, and 93% of ICU-CAs had favourable neurological outcome. Effective cost per one-year survivor was (sic)76,212 for OHCAs, (sic)144,168 for IHCAs, and (sic)239,468 for ICU-CAs. Effective cost per one-year survivor with favourable neurological outcome was (sic)81,196 for OHCAs, (sic)164,442 for IHCAs, and _(sic)257,207 for ICU-CAs. Conclusions: In-ICU CA patients had the lowest one-year survival with the effective cost per survivor three times higher than for OHCAs.
  • Int Liaison Comm Resuscitation; Buick, Jason E.; Wallner, Clare; Aickin, Richard; Meaney, Peter A.; de Caen, Allan; Maconochie, Ian; Skrifvars, Markus B.; Welsford, Michelle (2019)
    Introduction: The International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation prioritized the need to update the review on the use of targeted temperature management (TTM) in paediatric post cardiac arrest care. In this meta-analysis, the effectiveness of TTM at 32-36 degrees C was compared with no target or a different target for comatose children who achieve a return of sustained circulation after cardiac arrest. Methods: Electronic databases were searched from inception to December 13, 2018. Randomized controlled trials and non-randomized studies with a comparator group that evaluated TTM in children were included. Pairs of independent reviewers extracted the demographic and outcome data, appraised risk of bias, and assessed GRADE certainty of effects. A random effects meta-analysis was undertaken where possible. Results: Twelve studies involving 2060 patients were included. Two randomized controlled trials provided the evidence that TTM at 32-34 degrees C compared with a target at 36-37.5 degrees C did not statistically improve long-term good neurobehavioural survival (risk ratio: 1.15; 95% CI: 0.69-1.93), long-term survival (RR: 1.14; 95% CI: 0.93-1.39), or short-term survival (risk ratio: 1.14; 95% CI: 0.96-1.36). TTM at 32-34 degrees C did not show statistically increased risks of infection, recurrent cardiac arrest, serious bleeding, or arrhythmias. A novel analysis suggests that another small RCT might provide enough evidence to show benefit for TTM in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Conclusion: There is currently inconclusive evidence to either support or refute the use of TTM at 32-34 degrees C for comatose children who achieve return of sustained circulation after cardiac arrest. Future trials should focus on children with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.
  • Oja, Pekka; Bull, Fiona C.; Fogelholm, Mikael; Martin, Brian W. (2010)
  • Hiltunen, Pamela; Kuisma, Markku; Silfvast, Tom; Rutanen, Juha; Vaahersalo, Jukka; Kurola, Jouni; Finnresusci Prehosp Study Grp (2012)
  • Zonszein, Joel; Groop, Per-Henrik (2016)
    The duration of uncontrolled type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) can adversely impact small and large vessels, eventually leading to microvascular and macrovascular complications. Failure of therapeutic lifestyle changes, monotherapy, and clinical inertia contribute to persistent hyperglycemia and disease progression. The aim was to review the complex pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes and how different oral agents can be used effectively as first-line therapy in combination with metformin, as well as in patients not achieving glycemic goals with metformin therapy. For this review, a non-systematic literature search of PubMed, NCBI, and Google Scholar was conducted. New oral agents have made it possible to improve glycemic control to near-normal levels with a low risk of hypoglycemia and without weight gain, and sometimes with weight loss. Early combination therapy is effective and has been shown to have a favorable legacy effect. A number of agents are available in a single-pill combination (SPC) that provides fewer pills and better adherence. Compared with adding a sulfonylurea, still the most common oral combination used, empagliflozin has been shown to decrease cardiovascular (CV) events in a dedicated CV outcome study, and pioglitazone has been effective in reducing the risk of secondary CV endpoints, whereas sulfonylureas have been associated with an increased risk of CV disease. In those failing metformin, triple oral therapy by adding a non-metformin SPC such as empagliflozin/linagliptin or pioglitazone/alogliptin is a good option for reducing glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) without significant hypoglycemia. Clinicians have a comprehensive armamentarium of medications to treat patients with T2DM. Clinical evidence has shown that dual or triple oral combination therapy is effective for glycemic control, and early treatment is effective in getting patients to goal more quickly. Use of SPCs is an option for double or triple oral combination therapy and may result in better adherence.
  • Nolan, Jerry P.; Berg, Robert A.; Callaway, Clifton W.; Morrison, Laurie J.; Nadkarni, Vinay; Perkins, Gavin D.; Sandroni, Claudio; Skrifvars, Markus B.; Soar, Jasmeet; Sunde, Kjetil; Cariou, Alain (2018)
    The purpose of this review is to describe the epidemiology of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), disparities in organisation and outcome, recent advances in treatment and ongoing controversies. We also outline the standard of care that should be provided by the critical care specialist and propose future directions for cardiac arrest research. Narrative review with contributions from international resuscitation experts. Although it is recognised that survival rates from OHCA are increasing there is considerable scope for improvement and many countries have implemented national strategies in an attempt to achieve this goal. More resources are required to enable high-quality randomised trials in resuscitation. Increasing international collaboration should facilitate resuscitation research and knowledge translation. The International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR) has adopted a continuous evidence review process, which facilitate the implementation of resuscitation interventions proven to improve patient outcomes.
  • Kirkegaard, Hans; Rasmussen, Bodil S.; de Haas, Inge; Nielsen, Jorgen Feldbaek; Ilkjaer, Susanne; Kaltoft, Anne; Jeppesen, Anni Norregaard; Grejs, Anders; Duez, Christophe Henri Valdemar; Larsen, Alf Inge; Pettila, Ville; Toome, Valdo; Arus, Urmet; Taccone, Fabio Silvio; Storm, Christian; Skrifvars, Markus; Soreide, Eldar (2016)
    Background: The application of therapeutic hypothermia (TH) for 12 to 24 hours following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) has been associated with decreased mortality and improved neurological function. However, the optimal duration of cooling is not known. We aimed to investigate whether targeted temperature management (TTM) at 33 +/- 1 degrees C for 48 hours compared to 24 hours results in a better long-term neurological outcome. Methods: The TTH48 trial is an investigator-initiated pragmatic international trial in which patients resuscitated from OHCA are randomised to TTM at 33 +/- 1 degrees C for either 24 or 48 hours. Inclusion criteria are: age older than 17 and below 80 years; presumed cardiac origin of arrest; and Glasgow Coma Score (GCS) <8, on admission. The primary outcome is neurological outcome at 6 months using the Cerebral Performance Category score (CPC) by an assessor blinded to treatment allocation and dichotomised to good (CPC 1-2) or poor (CPC 3-5) outcome. Secondary outcomes are: 6-month mortality, incidence of infection, bleeding and organ failure and CPC at hospital discharge, at day 28 and at day 90 following OHCA. Assuming that 50 % of the patients treated for 24 hours will have a poor outcome at 6 months, a study including 350 patients (175/arm) will have 80 % power (with a significance level of 5 %) to detect an absolute 15 % difference in primary outcome between treatment groups. A safety interim analysis was performed after the inclusion of 175 patients. Discussion: This is the first randomised trial to investigate the effect of the duration of TTM at 33 +/- 1 degrees C in adult OHCA patients. We anticipate that the results of this trial will add significant knowledge regarding the management of cooling procedures in OHCA patients.
  • Kortelainen, Jukka; Vayrynen, Eero; Huuskonen, Usko; Laurila, Jouko; Koskenkari, Juha; Backman, Janne T.; Alahuhta, Seppo; Seppanen, Tapio; Ala-Kokko, Tero (IEEE, 2016)
    IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society Conference Proceedings
    Hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) is a severe consequence of cardiac arrest (CA) representing a substantial diagnostic challenge. We have recently designed a novel method for the assessment of HIE after CA. The method is based on estimating the severity of the brain injury by analyzing changes in the electroencephalogram (EEG) slow wave activity while the patient is exposed to an anesthetic drug propofol in a controlled manner. In this paper, Hilbert-Huang Transform (HHT) was used to analyze EEG slow wave activity during anesthesia in ten post-CA patients. The recordings were made in the intensive care unit 36-48 hours after the CA in an experiment, during which the propofol infusion rate was incrementally decreased to determine the drug-induced changes in the EEG at different anesthetic levels. HHT was shown to successfully capture the changes in the slow wave activity to the behavior of intrinsic mode functions (IMFs). While, in patients with good neurological outcome defined after a six-month control period, propofol induced a significant increase in the amplitude of IMFs representing the slow wave activity, the patients with poor neurological outcome were unable to produce such a response. Consequently, the proposed method offer substantial prognostic potential by providing a novel approach for early estimation of HIE after CA.
  • Nichol, Graham; Brown, Siobhan P.; Perkins, Gavin D.; Kim, Francis; Sterz, Fritz; Elrod, Jo Ann Broeckel; Mentzelopoulos, Spyros; Lyon, Richard; Arabi, Yaseen; Castren, Maaret; Larsen, Peter; Valenzuela, Terence; Graesner, Jan-Thorsten; Youngquist, Scott; Khunkhlai, Nalinas; Wang, Henry E.; Ondrej, Franek; Fraga Sastrias, Juan Manuel; Barasa, Anders; Sayre, Michael R. (2016)
    Background: Efficient trials of interventions for patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) should have adequate but not excess power to detect a difference in outcomes. The minimum clinically important difference (MCID) is the threshold value in outcomes observed in a trial at which providers should choose to adopt a treatment. There has been limited assessment of MCID for outcomes after OHCA. Therefore, we conducted an international survey of individuals interested in cardiac resuscitation to define the MCID for a range of outcomes after OHCA. Methods: A brief survey instrument was developed and modified by consensus. Included were open-ended responses. The survey included an illustrative example of a hypothetical randomized study with distributions of outcomes based on those in a public use datafile from a previous trial. Elicited information included the minimum significant difference required in an outcome to change clinical practice. The population of interest was emergency physicians or other practitioners of acute cardiovascular research. Results: Usable responses were obtained from 160 respondents (50% of surveyed) in 46 countries (79% of surveyed). MCIDs tended to increase as baseline outcomes increased. For a population of patients with 25% survival to discharge and 20% favorable neurologic status at discharge, the MCID were median 5 (interquartile range [IQR] 3, 10) percent for survival to discharge; median 5 (IQR 2, 10) percent for favorable neurologic status at discharge, median 4 (IQR 2, 9) days of ICU-free survival and median 4 (IQR 2, 8) days of hospital-free survival. Conclusion: Reported MCIDs for outcomes after OHCA vary according to the outcome considered as well as the baseline rate of achieving it. MCIDs of ICU-free survival or hospital-free survival may be useful to accelerate the rate of evidence-based change in resuscitation care. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.