Browsing by Subject "AMINO-ACIDS"

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  • Sanwald, Corinna; Robciuc, Alexandra; Ruokonen, Suvi-Katriina; Wiedmer, Susanne K.; Lammerhofer, Michael (2019)
    This work presents the development and validation of a quantitative HILIC UHPLC-ESI-QTOF-MS/MS method for amino acids combined with untargeted metabolic profiling of human corneal epithelial (HCE) cells after treatment with ionic liquids. The work included a preliminary metabotoxicity screening of 14 different ionic liquids, of which 9 carefully selected ionic liquids were chosen for a metabolomics study. This study is focused on the correlation between the toxicity of the ionic liquids and their metabolic profiles. The method development included the comparison of different MS/MS acquisition modes. A sequential window acquisition of all theoretical fragment ion mass spectra (SWATH) method with variable Q1 window widths and narrow Q1 target windows of 5 Da for most of the amino acids was selected as the optimal acquisition mode. Due to the absence of a true blank matrix, C-13,N-15-isotopically labelled amino acids were utilized as surrogate calibrants, instead of proteinogenic amino acids. Partial least squares (PLS) analysis of the median effective concentrations (EC50) of 9 selected ionic liquids showed a correlation with their metabolic profile measured by the untargeted screening.
  • Deelen, Joris; Kettunen, Johannes; Fischer, Krista; van der Spek, Ashley; Trompet, Stella; Kastenmueller, Gabi; Boyd, Andy; Zierer, Jonas; van den Akker, Erik B.; Ala-Korpela, Mika; Amin, Najaf; Demirkan, Ayse; Ghanbari, Mohsen; van Heemst, Diana; Ikram, M. Arfan; van Klinken, Jan Bert; Mooijaart, Simon P.; Peters, Annette; Salomaa, Veikko; Sattar, Naveed; Spector, Tim D.; Tiemeier, Henning; Verhoeven, Aswin; Waldenberger, Melanie; Wuertz, Peter; Smith, George Davey; Metspalu, Andres; Perola, Markus; Menni, Cristina; Geleijnse, Johanna M.; Drenos, Fotios; Beekman, Marian; Jukema, J. Wouter; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Slagboom, P. Eline (2019)
    Predicting longer-term mortality risk requires collection of clinical data, which is often cumbersome. Therefore, we use a well-standardized metabolomics platform to identify metabolic predictors of long-term mortality in the circulation of 44,168 individuals (age at baseline 18-109), of whom 5512 died during follow-up. We apply a stepwise (forward-backward) procedure based on meta-analysis results and identify 14 circulating biomarkers independently associating with all-cause mortality. Overall, these associations are similar in men and women and across different age strata. We subsequently show that the prediction accuracy of 5- and 10-year mortality based on a model containing the identified biomarkers and sex (C-statistic = 0.837 and 0.830, respectively) is better than that of a model containing conventional risk factors for mortality (C-statistic = 0.772 and 0.790, respectively). The use of the identified metabolic profile as a predictor of mortality or surrogate endpoint in clinical studies needs further investigation.
  • Marini, Selena; Santangeli, Olena; Saarelainen, Pirjo; Middleton, Benita; Chowdhury, Namrata; Skene, Debra J.; Costa, Rodolfo; Porkka-Heiskanen, Tarja; Montagnese, Sara (2017)
    Patients with liver cirrhosis can develop hyperammonemia and hepatic encephalopathy (HE), accompanied by pronounced daytime sleepiness. Previous studies with healthy volunteers show that experimental increase in blood ammonium levels increases sleepiness and slows the waking electroencephalogram. As ammonium increases adenosine levels invitro, and adenosine is a known regulator of sleep/wake homeostasis, we hypothesized that the sleepiness-inducing effect of ammonium is mediated by adenosine. Eight adult male Wistar rats were fed with an ammonium-enriched diet for 4 weeks; eight rats on standard diet served as controls. Each animal was implanted with electroencephalography/electromyography (EEG/EMG) electrodes and a microdialysis probe. Sleep EEG recording and cerebral microdialysis were carried out at baseline and after 6 h of sleep deprivation. Adenosine and metabolite levels were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and targeted LC/MS metabolomics, respectively. Baseline adenosine and metabolite levels (12 of 16 amino acids, taurine, t4-hydroxy-proline, and acetylcarnitine) were lower in hyperammonemic animals, while putrescine was higher. After sleep deprivation, hyperammonemic animals exhibited a larger increase in adenosine levels, and a number of metabolites showed a different time-course in the two groups. In both groups the recovery period was characterized by a significant decrease in wakefulness/increase in NREM and REM sleep. However, while control animals exhibited a gradual compensatory effect, hyperammonemic animals showed a significantly shorter recovery phase. In conclusion, the adenosine/metabolite/EEG response to sleep deprivation was modulated by hyperammonemia, suggesting that ammonia affects homeostatic sleep regulation and its metabolic correlates.
  • Maury, Carl Peter J. (2018)
    A crucial stage in the origin of life was the emergence of the first molecular entity that was able to replicate, transmit information, and evolve on the early Earth. The amyloid world hypothesis posits that in the pre-RNA era, information processing was based on catalytic amyloids. The self-assembly of short peptides into beta-sheet amyloid conformers leads to extraordinary structural stability and novel multifunctionality that cannot be achieved by the corresponding nonaggregated peptides. The new functions include self-replication, catalytic activities, and information transfer. The environmentally sensitive template-assisted replication cycles generate a variety of amyloid polymorphs on which evolutive forces can act, and the fibrillar assemblies can serve as scaffolds for the amyloids themselves and for ribonucleotides proteins and lipids. The role of amyloid in the putative transition process from an amyloid world to an amyloid-RNA-protein world is not limited to scaffolding and protection: the interactions between amyloid, RNA, and protein are both complex and cooperative, and the amyloid assemblages can function as protometabolic entities catalyzing the formation of simple metabolite precursors. The emergence of a pristine amyloid-based in-put sensitive, chiroselective, and error correcting information-processing system, and the evolvement of mutualistic networks were, arguably, of essential importance in the dynamic processes that led to increased complexity, organization, compartmentalization, and, eventually, the origin of life.
  • Freese, Tyll; Lücke, Ana-Luiza; Schmidt, Catharina A. S.; Polamo, Mika; Nieger, Martin; Namyslo, Jan C.; Schmidt, Andreas (2017)
    The sydnone imines Molsidomine and 5-(benzoylimino)-3-(2-methoxyphenyl)-1,2,3-oxadiazolium-2-ide gave anionic N-heterocyclic carbenes on deprotonation at C4 which were trapped as methylated selenium adducts, gold complexes (X-ray analysis) as well as palladium complexes (X-ray analysis). The C-13 NMR resonance frequencies of the carbene carbon atom are extremely shifted upfield and appear at delta = 142.1 ppm (Molsidomine carbene) and delta = 159.8 ppm (sydnone imine carbene). The Pd complexes were applied as catalysts in Suzuki-Miyaura and Sonogashira-Hagihara cross-coupling reactions. (C) 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • Multia, Evgen; Liangsupree, Thanaporn; Jussila, Matti; Ruiz-Jimenez, Jose; Kemell, Marianna; Riekkola, Marja-Liisa (2020)
    An automated on-line isolation and fractionation system including controlling software was developed for selected nanosized biomacromolecules from human plasma by on-line coupled immunoaffinity chromatography-asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (IAC-AsFlFFF). The on-line system was versatile, only different monoclonal antibodies, anti-apolipoprotein B-100, anti-CD9, or anti-CD61, were immobilized on monolithic disk columns for isolation of lipoproteins and extracellular vesicles (EVs). The platelet-derived CD61-positive EVs and CD9-positive EVs, isolated by IAC, were further fractionated by AsFlFFF to their size-based subpopulations (e.g., exomeres and exosomes) for further analysis. Field-emission scanning electron microscopy elucidated the morphology of the subpopulations, and 20 free amino acids and glucose in EV subpopulations were identified and quantified in the ng/mL range using hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HILIC-MS/MS). The study revealed that there were significant differences between EV origin and size-based subpopulations. The on-line coupled IAC-AsFlFFF system was successfully programmed for reliable execution of 10 sequential isolation and fractionation cycles (37–80 min per cycle) with minimal operator involvement, minimal sample losses, and contamination. The relative standard deviations (RSD) between the cycles for human plasma samples were 0.84–6.6%.
  • Barrios, Clara; Zierer, Jonas; Würtz, Peter; Haller, Toomas; Metspalu, Andres; Gieger, Christian; Thorand, Barbara; Meisinger, Christa; Waldenberger, Melanie; Raitakari, Olli; Lehtimäki, Terho; Otero, Sol; Rodriguez, Eva; Pedro-Botet, Juan; Kähönen, Mika; Ala-Korpela, Mika; Kastenmüller, Gabi; Spector, Tim D.; Pascual, Julio; Menni, Cristina (2018)
    Using targeted NMR spectroscopy of 227 fasting serum metabolic traits, we searched for novel metabolic signatures of renal function in 926 type 2 diabetics (T2D) and 4838 non-diabetic individuals from four independent cohorts. We furthermore investigated longitudinal changes of metabolic measures and renal function and associations with other T2D microvascular complications. 142 traits correlated with glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) after adjusting for confounders and multiple testing: 59 in diabetics, 109 in non-diabetics with 26 overlapping. The amino acids glycine and phenylalanine and the energy metabolites citrate and glycerol were negatively associated with eGFR in all the cohorts, while alanine, valine and pyruvate depicted opposite association in diabetics (positive) and nondiabetics (negative). Moreover, in all cohorts, the triglyceride content of different lipoprotein subclasses showed a negative association with eGFR, while cholesterol, cholesterol esters (CE), and phospholipids in HDL were associated with better renal function. In contrast, phospholipids and CEs in LDL showed positive associations with eGFR only in T2D, while phospholipid content in HDL was positively associated with eGFR both cross-sectionally and longitudinally only in non-diabetics. In conclusion, we provide a wide list of kidney function-associated metabolic traits and identified novel metabolic differences between diabetic and non-diabetic kidney disease.
  • Haraguchi, Lumi; Asmala, Eero; Jakobsen, Hans H.; Carstensen, Jacob (2019)
    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) is an important component of nutrient cycling, but the role of different organisms controlling the processing of autochthonous DOM remains poorly understood. Aiming to characterize phytoplankton-derived DOM and the effects of complex pelagic communities on its dynamics, we incubated natural plankton communities from a temperate mesohaline estuary under controlled conditions for 18 days. The incubations were carried out in contrasting seasons (spring and autumn) and changes in the planktonic community (phytoplankton, bacteria and microzooplankton), nutrients and DOM were assessed. Our results highlight the complexity of DOM production and fate in natural planktonic communities. Small changes in DOM composition were observed in the experiments relative to the orders-of-magnitude variations experienced in the phytoplankton assembly. We argue that the tight coupling between microbial processing and DOM production by phytoplankton and grazers stabilizes variations in quantity and characteristics of autochthonous DOM, resulting in apparently homogeneous semi-labile DOM pool throughout the experiments. However, seasonal differences in the production and processing of DOM were observed, reflecting differences in the nutrient regimes and initial DOM characteristics in each experiment, but also likely influenced by changes in the successional status of the pelagic community. Acknowledging that characteristics of the DOM derived from phytoplankton growth can vary broadly, heterotrophic processing and successional status of the community are synergistically important factors for shaping those characteristics, and thus affecting the seasonal signature of the semi-labile autochthonous DOM pool.
  • Kissing, Sandra; Rudnik, Soenke; Damme, Markus; Luellmann-Rauch, Renate; Ichihara, Atsuhiro; Kornak, Uwe; Eskelinen, Eeva-Liisa; Jabs, Sabrina; Heeren, Joerg; De Brabander, Jef K.; Haas, Albert; Saftig, Paul (2017)
    The vacuolar-type H+-translocating ATPase (v-H+-ATPase) has been implicated in the amino aciddependent activation of the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (MTORC1), an important regulator of macroautophagy. To reveal the mechanistic links between the v-H+-ATPase and MTORC1, we destablilized v-H+-ATPase complexes in mouse liver cells by induced deletion of the essential chaperone ATP6AP2. ATP6AP2-mutants are characterized by massive accumulation of endocytic and autophagic vacuoles in hepatocytes. This cellular phenotype was not caused by a block in endocytic maturation or an impaired acidification. However, the degradation of LC3-II in the knockout hepatocytes appeared to be reduced. When v-H+-ATPase levels were decreased, we observed lysosome association of MTOR and normal signaling of MTORC1 despite an increase in autophagic marker proteins. To better understand why MTORC1 can be active when v-H+-ATPase is depleted, the activation of MTORC1 was analyzed in ATP6AP2-deficient fibroblasts. In these cells, very little amino acid-elicited activation of MTORC1 was observed. In contrast, insulin did induce MTORC1 activation, which still required intracellular amino acid stores. These results suggest that in vivo the regulation of macroautophagy depends not only on v-H+-ATPase-mediated regulation of MTORC1.
  • Halmemies-Beauchet-Filleau, A.; Shingfield, K. J.; Simpura, I.; Kokkonen, T.; Jaakkola, S.; Toivonen, V.; Vanhatalo, A. (2017)
    Camelina is an ancient oilseed crop that produces an oil rich in cis-9,cis-12 18:2 (linoleic acid, LA) and cis9,cis-12, cis-15 18:3 (alpha-linolenic acid, ALA); however, reports on the use of camelina oil (CO) for ruminants are limited. The present study investigated the effects of incremental CO supplementation on animal performance, milk fatty acid (FA) composition, and milk sensory quality. Eight Finnish Ayrshire cows (91 d in milk) were used in replicated 4 x 4 Latin squares with 21-d periods. Treatments comprised 4 concentrates (12 kg/d on an air-dry basis) based on cereals and camelina expeller containing 0 (control), 2, 4, or 6% CO on an air-dry basis. Cows were offered a mixture of grass and red clover silage (RCS; 1:1 on a dry matter basis) ad libitum. Incremental CO supplementation linearly decreased silage and total dry matter intake, and linearly increased LA, ALA, and total FA intake. Treatments had no effect on whole-tract apparent organic matter or fiber digestibility and did not have a major influence on rumen fermentation. Supplements of CO quadratically decreased daily milk and lactose yields and linearly decreased milk protein yield and milk taste panel score from 4.2 to 3.6 [on a scale of 1 (poor) to 5 (excellent)], without altering milk fat yield. Inclusion of CO linearly decreased the proportions of saturated FA synthesized de novo (4:0 to 16:0), without altering milk fat 18:0, cis-9 18:1, LA, and ALA concentrations. Milk fat 18:0 was low (
  • Bao, Yulong; Ertbjerg, Per (2019)
    Protein oxidation readily occurs in postmortem muscle during storage and processing. Over the past decade new analytical methods have been developed and new aspects of protein oxidation in meat have been studied, such as the reaction mechanism, and impacts on eating quality and nutritional value. It is now evident that amino acid side chains in myofibrillar proteins undergoes modifications due to oxidative stress. In turn this will lead to formation of new protein-protein cross-links in structural proteins, however, also the overall level of fixed-charge groups attached to the peptide backbones is modified. Meat texture and water-holding are important quality attributes and they are affected by the oxidation of structural proteins. Different mechanisms have been suggested to explain the oxidation-induced quality changes, focusing mainly on reduced proteolysis and formation of cross-links. This review explores the current understanding of protein oxidation in fresh meat in relation to texture and water-holding. The consequences of protein oxidation at molecular level in relation to oxidation-induced cross-linking and changes in net charges of myofibrillar proteins, and the impacts on texture and water-holding are discussed.
  • Shaw, Vanessa; Polderman, Nonnie; Renken-Terhaerdt, Jose; Paglialonga, Fabio; Oosterveld, Michiel; Tuokkola, Jetta; Anderson, Caroline; Desloovere, An; Greenbaum, Laurence; Haffner, Dieter; Nelms, Christina; Qizalbash, Leila; Vande Walle, Johan; Warady, Bradley; Shroff, Rukshana; Rees, Lesley (2020)
    Dietary management in pediatric chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an area fraught with uncertainties and wide variations in practice. Even in tertiary pediatric nephrology centers, expert dietetic input is often lacking. The Pediatric Renal Nutrition Taskforce (PRNT), an international team of pediatric renal dietitians and pediatric nephrologists, was established to develop clinical practice recommendations (CPRs) to address these challenges and to serve as a resource for nutritional care. We present CPRs for energy and protein requirements for children with CKD stages 2-5 and those on dialysis (CKD2-5D). We address energy requirements in the context of poor growth, obesity, and different levels of physical activity, together with the additional protein needs to compensate for dialysate losses. We describe how to achieve the dietary prescription for energy and protein using breastmilk, formulas, food, and dietary supplements, which can be incorporated into everyday practice. Statements with a low grade of evidence, or based on opinion, must be considered and adapted for the individual patient by the treating physician and dietitian according to their clinical judgment. Research recommendations have been suggested. The CPRs will be regularly audited and updated by the PRNT.
  • Taipale, Sami J.; Vuorio, Kristiina; Aalto, Sanni L.; Peltomaa, Elina; Tiirola, Marja (2019)
    Eutrophication (as an increase in total phosphorus [TP]) increases harmful algal blooms and reduces the proportion of high-quality phytoplankton in seston and the content of ω-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (eicosapentaenoic acid [EPA] and docosahexaenoic acid [DHA]) in fish. However, it is not well-known how eutrophication affects the overall nutritional value of phytoplankton. Therefore, we studied the impact of eutrophication on the production (as concentration; μg L−1) and content (μg mg C−1) of amino acids, EPA, DHA, and sterols, i.e., the nutritional value of phytoplankton in 107 boreal lakes. The lakes were categorized in seven TP concentration categories ranging from ultra-oligotrophic (50 μg L−1). Phytoplankton total biomass increased with TP as expected, but in contrast to previous studies, the contribution of high-quality phytoplankton did not decrease with TP. However, the high variation reflected instability in the phytoplankton community structure in eutrophic lakes. We found that the concentration of amino acids increased in the epilimnion whereas the concentration of sterols decreased with increasing TP. In terms of phytoplankton nutritional value, amino acids, EPA, DHA, and sterols showed a significant quadratic relationship with the lake trophic status. More specifically, the amino acid contents were the same in the oligo- and mesotrophic lakes, but substantially lower in the eutrophic lakes (TP > 35 μg L−1/1.13 μmol L−1). The highest EPA and DHA content in phytoplankton was found in the mesotrophic lakes, whereas the sterol content was highest in the oligotrophic lakes. Based on these results, the nutritional value of phytoplankton reduces with eutrophication, although the contribution of high-quality algae does not decrease. Therefore, the results emphasize that eutrophication, as excess TP, reduces the nutritional value of phytoplankton, which may have a significant impact on the nutritional value of zooplankton, fish, and other aquatic animals at higher food web levels.
  • Li, Junyu; Wu, Guoxi; Guo, Qingxue; Korpelainen, Helena; Li, Chunyang (2018)
    There are significant differences in the morphological and physiological responses of larch species with contrasting growth rates under fertilization. However, little is known about species-specific differences in responses to nutrient imbalance caused by fertilization. Therefore, in this study, the effects of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) fertilization on the morphological, physiological and chloroplast ultrastructural traits of two contrasting larch species, fast-growing Larix kaempferi and slowly-growing L. olgensis, grown in larch plantation soil, were investigated during two growth seasons. It was shown that N and combined N and P (NP) fertilization increased plant photosynthesis, foliar N contents, chlorophyll contents, and dry mass accumulation and partitioning in aboveground organs in both larch species. Although P fertilization enhanced P accumulation, its presence reduced the N content in soluble proteins in the foliage of both larch species. Yet, P fertilization exhibited some differences in the two species: P fertilization increased photosynthesis, chlorophyll content and biomass accumulation of L. olgensis, while it decreased these parameters dramatically in L. kaempfert P fertilization increased foliar N content in L. olgensis, while it reduced it in L. kaempferi. P fertilized L. kaempferi had more damaged chloroplast ultrastructure than L. olgensis. In addition, L. kaempferi exhibited lower acid phosphatase activities, and higher photosynthesis and biomass accumulation than L. olgensis, except under P fertilization. L. kaempferi allocated more biomass into needles, except under P fertilization, while L. olgensis allocated more into stems under fertilization. In conclusion, it was shown that nutrient imbalance caused by P fertilization has greater negative effects on a fast-growing species than on a slowly-growing one, and the negative effects are related to differences in acclimation strategies, N partitioning to photosynthetic components, and P transportation and metabolism in the foliage.
  • Pan, David Z.; Miao, Zong; Comenho, Caroline; Rajkumar, Sandhya; Koka, Amogha; Lee, Seung Hyuk T.; Alvarez, Marcus; Kaminska, Dorota; Ko, Arthur; Sinsheimer, Janet S.; Mohlke, Karen L.; Mancuso, Nicholas; Munoz-Hernandez, Linda Liliana; Herrera-Hernandez, Miguel; Tusie-Luna, Maria Teresa; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos; Pietiläinen, Kirsi H.; Pihlajamäki, Jussi; Laakso, Markku; Garske, Kristina M.; Pajukanta, Päivi (2021)
    Background: Obesity predisposes individuals to multiple cardiometabolic disorders, including type 2 diabetes (T2D). As body mass index (BMI) cannot reliably differentiate fat from lean mass, the metabolically detrimental abdominal obesity has been estimated using waist-hip ratio (WHR). Waist-hip ratio adjusted for body mass index (WHRadjBMI) in turn is a well-established sex-specific marker for abdominal fat and adiposity, and a predictor of adverse metabolic outcomes, such as T2D. However, the underlying genes and regulatory mechanisms orchestrating the sex differences in obesity and body fat distribution in humans are not well understood. Methods: We searched for genetic master regulators of WHRadjBMI by employing integrative genomics approaches on human subcutaneous adipose RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) data (n similar to 1400) and WHRadjBMI GWAS data (n similar to 700,000) from the WHRadjBMI GWAS cohorts and the UK Biobank (UKB), using co-expression network, transcriptome-wide association study (TWAS), and polygenic risk score (PRS) approaches. Finally, we functionally verified our genomic results using gene knockdown experiments in a human primary cell type that is critical for adipose tissue function. Results: Here, we identified an adipose gene co-expression network that contains 35 obesity GWAS genes and explains a significant amount of polygenic risk for abdominal obesity and T2D in the UKB (n = 392,551) in a sex-dependent way. We showed that this network is preserved in the adipose tissue data from the Finnish Kuopio Obesity Study and Mexican Obesity Study. The network is controlled by a novel adipose master transcription factor (TF), TBX15, a WHRadjBMI GWAS gene that regulates the network in trans. Knockdown of TBX15 in human primary preadipocytes resulted in changes in expression of 130 network genes, including the key adipose TFs, PPARG and KLF15, which were significantly impacted (FDR < 0.05), thus functionally verifying the trans regulatory effect of TBX15 on the WHRadjBMI co-expression network. Conclusions: Our study discovers a novel key function for the TBX15 TF in trans regulating an adipose co-expression network of 347 adipose, mitochondrial, and metabolically important genes, including PPARG, KLF15, PPARA, ADIPOQ, and 35 obesity GWAS genes. Thus, based on our converging genomic, transcriptional, and functional evidence, we interpret the role of TBX15 to be a main transcriptional regulator in the adipose tissue and discover its importance in human abdominal obesity.
  • de Mello, Vanessa D.; Paananen, Jussi; Lindstrom, Jaana; Lankinen, Maria A.; Shi, Lin; Kuusisto, Johanna; Pihlajamaki, Jussi; Auriola, Seppo; Lehtonen, Marko; Rolandsson, Olov; Bergdahl, Ingvar A.; Nordin, Elise; Ilanne-Parikka, Pirjo; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka; Landberg, Rikard; Eriksson, Johan G.; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Hanhineva, Kati; Uusitupa, Matti (2017)
    Wide-scale profiling technologies including metabolomics broaden the possibility of novel discoveries related to the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes (T2D). By applying non-targeted metabolomics approach, we investigated here whether serum metabolite profile predicts T2D in a well-characterized study population with impaired glucose tolerance by examining two groups of individuals who took part in the Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study (DPS); those who either early developed T2D (n = 96) or did not convert to T2D within the 15-year follow-up (n = 104). Several novel metabolites were associated with lower likelihood of developing T2D, including indole and lipid related metabolites. Higher indolepropionic acid was associated with reduced likelihood of T2D in the DPS. Interestingly, in those who remained free of T2D, indolepropionic acid and various lipid species were associated with better insulin secretion and sensitivity, respectively. Furthermore, these metabolites were negatively correlated with low-grade inflammation. We replicated the association between indolepropionic acid and T2D risk in one Finnish and one Swedish population. We suggest that indolepropionic acid, a gut microbiota-produced metabolite, is a potential biomarker for the development of T2D that may mediate its protective effect by preservation of alpha-cell function. Novel lipid metabolites associated with T2D may exert their effects partly through enhancing insulin sensitivity.
  • Sahle, Christoph J.; Schroer, Martin A.; Juurinen, Iina; Niskanen, Johannes (2016)
    We present a study on the influence of the naturally occurring organic osmolytes tri-methylamine N-oxide (TMAO) and urea on the bulk structure of water using X-ray Raman scattering spectroscopy. Addition of TMAO is known to stabilize proteins in otherwise destabilizing aqueous urea solutions. The experimental X-ray Raman scattering spectra change systematically with increasing solute concentration revealing different effects on the structure of water due to the presence of the two osmolytes. Although these effects are distinct for both molecular species, they have mutually compensating influences on the spectra of the ternary water-TMAO-urea mixtures. This compensation effect seen in the spectra vanishes only at the highest studied ternary concentration of 4 M: 4 M (TMAO : urea). Our experiment shows that the hydrogen-bonding structure of water remains rather intact in the presence of the aforementioned osmolytes if both of them are present.
  • Rowe, Owen F.; Dinasquet, Julie; Paczkowska, Joanna; Figueroa, Daniela; Riemann, Lasse; Andersson, Agneta (2018)
    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) in marine waters is a complex mixture of compounds and elements that contribute substantially to the global carbon cycle. The large reservoir of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) represents a vital resource for heterotrophic bacteria. Bacteria can utilise, produce, recycle and transform components of the DOM pool, and the physicochemical characteristics of this pool can directly influence bacterial activity; with consequences for nutrient cycling and primary productivity. In the present study we explored bacterial transformation of naturally occurring DOM across an extensive brackish water gradient in the Baltic Sea. Highest DOC utilisation (indicated by decreased DOC concentration) was recorded in the more saline southerly region where waters are characterised by more autochthonous DOM. These sites expressed the lowest bacterial growth efficiency (BGE), whereas in northerly regions, characterised by higher terrestrial and allochthonous DOM, the DOC utilisation was low and BGE was highest. Bacterial processing of the DOM pool in the south resulted in larger molecular weight compounds and compounds associated with secondary terrestrial humic matter being degraded, and a processed DOM pool that was more aromatic in nature and contributed more strongly to water colour; while the opposite was true in the north. Nutrient concentration and stoichiometry and DOM characteristics affected bacterial activity, including metabolic status (BGE), which influenced DOM transformations. Our study highlights dramatic differences in DOM characteristics and microbial carbon cycling in sub-basins of the Baltic Sea. These findings are critical for our understanding of carbon and nutrient biogeochemistry, particularly in light of climate change scenarios.
  • Hotti, Hannu; Gopalacharyulu, Peddinti; Seppanen-Laakso, Tuulikki; Rischer, Heiko (2017)
    Sarraceniaceae is a New World carnivorous plant family comprising three genera: Darlingtonia, Heliamphora, and Sarracenia. The plants occur in nutrient-poor environments and have developed insectivorous capability in order to supplement their nutrient uptake. Sarracenia flava contains the alkaloid coniine, otherwise only found in Conium maculatum, in which its biosynthesis has been studied, and several Aloe species. Its ecological role and biosynthetic origin in S. flava is speculative. The aim of the current research was to investigate the occurrence of coniine in Sarracenia and Darlingtonia and to identify common constituents of both genera, unique compounds for individual variants and floral scent chemicals. In this comprehensive metabolic profiling study, we looked for compound patterns that are associated with the taxonomy of Sarracenia species. In total, 57 different Sarracenia and D. californica accessions were used for metabolite content screening by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The resulting high-dimensional data were studied using a data mining approach. The two genera are characterized by a large number of metabolites and huge chemical diversity between different species. By applying feature selection for clustering and by integrating new biochemical data with existing phylogenetic data, we were able to demonstrate that the chemical composition of the species can be explained by their known classification. Although transcriptome analysis did not reveal a candidate gene for coniine biosynthesis, the use of a sensitive selected ion monitoring method enabled the detection of coniine in eight Sarracenia species, showing that it is more widespread in this genus than previously believed.
  • Ylinen, Vappu; Pylkkö, Päivi; Peura, Jussi; Tuomola, Essi; Valaja, Jarmo (2018)
    The effects of low-protein diets supplemented with DL-methionine (MET) and L-histidine (HIS) on growth, pelt size and pelt quality were studied in two performance trials conducted at the Kannus Research Farm Luova Ltd, Finland. Both trials were conducted with 200 blue foxes, caged male-female pairs, initial age on average 20 weeks (trial 1) and 25 weeks (trial 2). In trial 1, diets contained digestible crude protein (DCP) 24%, 20% and 16% of metabolisable energy (ME). In trial 2, diets contained DCP 20%, 16.5% and 13% of ME. In both trials, the middle protein level was fed with or without MET and the lowest protein level was fed with MET and with or without HIS. In trial 1, blue foxes showed the greatest average daily gain (ADG) in the highest protein diet. Pelt size and pelt quality were not affected. In trial 2, blue foxes showed the greatest ADG in the low-protein groups. Pelt size and pelt quality were not affected.