Browsing by Subject "AMYLOID PRECURSOR PROTEIN"

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  • Guzman, Erika Avendano; Bouter, Yvonne; Richard, Bernhard C.; Lannfelt, Lars; Ingelsson, Martin; Paetau, Anders; Verkkoniemi-Ahola, Auli; Wirths, Oliver; Bayer, Thomas A. (2014)
  • Reinert, Jochim; Richard, Bernhard C.; Klafki, Hans W.; Friedrich, Beate; Bayer, Thomas A.; Wiltfang, Jens; Kovacs, Gabor G.; Ingelsson, Martin; Lannfelt, Lars; Paetau, Anders; Bergquist, Jonas; Wirths, Oliver (2016)
    In Alzheimer's disease (AD) a variety of amyloid beta-peptides (A beta) are deposited in the form of extracellular diffuse and neuritic plaques (NP), as well as within the vasculature. The generation of A beta from its precursor, the amyloid precursor protein (APP), is a highly complex procedure that involves subsequent proteolysis of APP by beta-and gamma-secretases. Brain accumulation of A beta due to impaired A beta degradation and/or altered ratios between the different A beta species produced is believed to play a pivotal role in AD pathogenesis. While the presence of A beta 40 and A beta 42 in vascular and parenchymal amyloid have been subject of extensive studies, the deposition of carboxyterminal truncated A beta peptides in AD has not received comparable attention. In the current study, we for the first time demonstrate the immunohistochemical localization of A beta 37 and A beta 39 in human sporadic AD (SAD). Our study further included the analysis of familial AD (FAD) cases carrying the APP mutations KM670/671NL, E693G and I716F, as well as a case of the PSEN1 Delta Exon9 mutation. A beta 37 and A beta 39 were found to be widely distributed within the vasculature in the brains of the majority of studied SAD and FAD cases, the latter also presenting considerable amounts of A beta 37 containing NPs. In addition, both peptides were found to be present in extracellular plaques but only scarce within the vasculature in brains of a variety of transgenic AD mouse models. Taken together, our study indicates the importance of C-terminally truncated A beta in sporadic and familial AD and raises questions about how these species are generated and regulated.
  • Konovalova, Julia; Gerasymchuk, Dmytro; Parkkinen, Ilmari; Chmielarz, Piotr; Domanskyi, Andrii (2019)
    MicroRNAs are post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression, crucial for neuronal differentiation, survival, and activity. Age-related dysregulation of microRNA biogenesis increases neuronal vulnerability to cellular stress and may contribute to the development and progression of neurodegenerative diseases. All major neurodegenerative disorders are also associated with oxidative stress, which is widely recognized as a potential target for protective therapies. Albeit often considered separately, microRNA networks and oxidative stress are inextricably entwined in neurodegenerative processes. Oxidative stress affects expression levels of multiple microRNAs and, conversely, microRNAs regulate many genes involved in an oxidative stress response. Both oxidative stress and microRNA regulatory networks also influence other processes linked to neurodegeneration, such as mitochondrial dysfunction, deregulation of proteostasis, and increased neuroinflammation, which ultimately lead to neuronal death. Modulating the levels of a relatively small number of microRNAs may therefore alleviate pathological oxidative damage and have neuroprotective activity. Here, we review the role of individual microRNAs in oxidative stress and related pathways in four neurodegenerative conditions: Alzheimer's (AD), Parkinson's (PD), Huntington's (HD) disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). We also discuss the problems associated with the use of oversimplified cellular models and highlight perspectives of studying microRNA regulation and oxidative stress in human stem cell-derived neurons.
  • Summanen, Milla; Granqvist, Niko; Tuominen, Raimo K.; Yliperttula, Marjo; Verrips, C. Theo; Boonstra, Johannes; Blanchetot, Christophe; Ekokoski, Elina (2012)
  • Merezhko, Maria; Pakarinen, Emmi; Uronen, Riikka-Liisa; Huttunen, Henri J. (2020)
    The plasma membrane consists of a variety of discrete domains differing from the surrounding membrane in composition and properties. Selective partitioning of protein to these microdomains is essential for membrane functioning and integrity. Studying the nanoscale size and dynamic nature of the membrane microdomains requires advanced imaging approaches with a high spatiotemporal resolution and, consequently, expensive and specialized equipment, unavailable for most researchers and unsuited for large-scale studies. Thus, understanding of protein partitioning to the membrane microdomains in health and disease is still hampered by the lack of inexpensive live-cell approaches with an appropriate spatial resolution. Here, we have developed a novel approach based on Gaussia princeps luciferase protein-fragment complementation assay to quantitively investigate protein partitioning to cholesterol and sphingomyelin-rich domains, sometimes called 'lipid rafts', in intact living cells with a high-spatial resolution. In the assay, the reporter construct, carrying one half of the luciferase protein, is targeted to lipid microdomains through the fused acetylation motif from Src-family kinase Fyn. A protein of interest carries the second half of the luciferase protein. Together, this serves as a reversible real-time sensor of raft recruitment for the studied protein. We demonstrated that the assay can efficiently detect the dynamic alterations in raft localization of two disease-associated proteins: Akt and APP. Importantly, this method can be used in high-throughput screenings and other large-scale studies in living cells. This inexpensive, and easy to implement raft localization assay will benefit all researchers interested in protein partitioning in rafts.
  • Sarajärvi, T.; Jäntti, M.; Paldanius, K. M. A.; Natunen, T.; Wu, J. C.; Mäkinen, P.; Tarvainen, I.; Tuominen, R. K.; Talman, V.; Hiltunen, M. (2018)
    Abnormal protein kinase C (PKC) function contributes to many pathophysiological processes relevant for Alzheimer's disease (AD), such as amyloid precursor protein (APP) processing. Phorbol esters and other PKC activators have been demonstrated to enhance the secretion of soluble APP alpha (sAPP alpha), reduce the levels of beta-amyloid (A beta), induce synaptogenesis, and promote neuroprotection. We have previously described isophthalate derivatives as a structurally simple family of PKC activators. Here, we characterised the effects of isophthalate derivatives HMI-1a3 and HMI-1b11 on neuronal viability, neuroinflammatory response, processing of APP and dendritic spine density and morphology in in vitro. HMI-1a3 increased the viability of embryonic primary cortical neurons and decreased the production of the pro-inflammatory mediator TNF alpha, but not that of nitric oxide, in mouse neuron-BV2 microglia co-cultures upon LPS- and IFN-gamma-induced neuroinflammation. Furthermore, both HMI-1a3 and HMI-1b11 increased the levels of sAPPa relative to total sAPP and the ratio of A beta 42/A beta 40 in human SH-Sv5v neuroblastoma cells. Finally, bryostatin-1, but not HMI-1a3, increased the number of mushroom spines in proportion to total spine density in mature mouse hippocampal neuron cultures. These results suggest that the PKC activator HMI-1a3 exerts neuroprotective functions in the in vitro models relevant for AD by reducing the production of TNF alpha and increasing the secretion of neuroprotective sAPPa.
  • Hosp, Fabian; Vossfeldt, Hannes; Heinig, Matthias; Vasiljevic, Djordje; Arumughan, Anup; Wyler, Emanuel; Landthaler, Markus; Hubner, Norbert; Wanker, Erich E.; Lannfelt, Lars; Ingelsson, Martin; Lalowski, Maciej; Voigt, Aaron; Selbach, Matthias; Genetic & Environm Risk Alzheimer' (2015)
    Several proteins have been linked to neurodegenerative disorders (NDDs), but their molecular function is not completely understood. Here, we used quantitative interaction proteomics to identify binding partners of Amyloid beta precursor protein (APP) and Presenilin-1 (PSEN1) for Alzheimer's disease (AD), Huntingtin (HTT) for Huntington's disease, Parkin (PARK2) for Parkinson's disease, and Ataxin-1 (ATXN1) for spinocerebellar ataxia type 1. Our network reveals common signatures of protein degradation and misfolding and recapitulates known biology. Toxicity modifier screens and comparison to genome-wide association studies show that interaction partners are significantly linked to disease phenotypes in vivo. Direct comparison of wild-type proteins and disease-associated variants identified binders involved in pathogenesis, highlighting the value of differential interactome mapping. Finally, we show that the mitochondrial protein LRPPRC interacts preferentially with an early-onset AD variant of APP. This interaction appears to induce mitochondrial dysfunction, which is an early phenotype of AD.
  • Glerup, Simon; Lume, Maria; Olsen, Ditte; Nyengaard, Jens R.; Vaegter, Christian B.; Gustafsen, Camilla; Christensen, Erik I.; Kjolby, Mads; Hay-Schmidt, Anders; Bender, Dirk; Madsen, Peder; Saarma, Mart; Nykjaer, Anders; Petersen, Claus M. (2013)