Browsing by Subject "ARM"

Sort by: Order: Results:

Now showing items 1-6 of 6
  • Vainio, Lari; Tiainen, Mikko (2018)
    Past studies have revealed connections in directional programming between hands. The present study investigated whether there could also be interaction in programming proximal and distal components of a prehensile hand action. In Experiment 1, the participants performed simultaneously either a push or pull response with the left hand and the grip closure or opening with the right hand. In Experiment 2, the push and pull responses of the left hand were performed together with the precision or power grip responses of the right hand. The participants showed preference, measured in reaction times, to couple the push response with the grip opening and the precision grip, whereas the pull response was associated with the grip closure and the power grip. The study shows for the first time a systematic interaction in proximal and distal prehensile components between two hands. We propose that these effects reflect inter- and intra-limb connections between the representations that prepare the arm extension for the outward reaching, the finger extension for the grip opening, and the motor processes that prepare the precision grip. Conversely, there appear to be connections between the representations that prepare the arm flexion for the inward directed hand movements, the flexion of the thumb and the fingers for the grip closure, and flexion of four fingers for the power grip.
  • Launonen, Antti P.; Sumrein, Bakir O.; Reito, Aleksi; Lepola, Vesa; Paloneva, Juha; Jonsson, Kenneth; Wolf, Olof; Ström, Peter; Berg, Hans E.; Felländer-Tsai, Li; Jansson, Karl-Åke; Fell, Daniel; Mechlenburg, Inger; Dossing, Kaj; Ostergaard, Helle T.; Märtson, Aare; Laitinen, Minna K.; Mattila, Ville M. (2019)
    Background Although increasingly used, the benefit of surgical treatment of displaced 2-part proximal humerus fractures has not been proven. This trial evaluates the clinical effectiveness of surgery with locking plate compared with non-operative treatment for these fractures. Methods and findings The NITEP group conducted a superiority, assessor-blinded, multicenter randomized trial in 6 hospitals in Finland, Estonia, Sweden, and Denmark. Eighty-eight patients aged 60 years or older with displaced (more than 1 cm or 45 degrees) 2-part surgical or anatomical neck proximal humerus fracture were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to undergo either operative treatment with a locking plate or non-operative treatment. The mean age of patients was 72 years in the non-operative group and 73 years in the operative group, with a female sex distribution of 95% and 87%, respectively. Patients were recruited between February 2011 and April 2016. The primary outcome measure was Disabilities of Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) score at 2-year follow-up. Secondary outcomes included Constant–Murley score, the visual analogue scale for pain, the quality of life questionnaire 15D, EuroQol Group’s 5- dimension self-reported questionnaire EQ-5D, the Oxford Shoulder Score, and complications. The mean DASH score (0 best, 100 worst) at 2 years was 18.5 points for the operative treatment group and 17.4 points for the non-operative group (mean difference 1.1 [95% CI −7.8 to 9.4], p = 0.81). At 2 years, there were no statistically or clinically significant between-group differences in any of the outcome measures. All 3 complications resulting in secondary surgery occurred in the operative group. The lack of blinding in patient-reported outcome assessment is a limitation of the study. Our assessor physiotherapists were, however, blinded. Conclusions This trial found no significant difference in clinical outcomes at 2 years between surgery and non-operative treatment in patients 60 years of age or older with displaced 2-part fractures of the proximal humerus. These results suggest that the current practice of performing surgery on the majority of displaced proximal 2-part fractures of the humerus in older adults may not be beneficial. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01246167.
  • Vainio, Lari; Tiippana, Kaisa; Tiainen, Mikko; Rantala, Aleksi; Vainio, Martti (2018)
    Research has shown connections between articulatory mouth actions and manual actions. This study investigates whether forward-backward hand movements could be associated with vowel production processes that programme tongue fronting/backing, lip rounding/spreading (Experiment 1), and/or consonant production processes that programme tongue tip and tongue dorsum actions (Experiment 2). The participants had to perform either forward or backward hand movement and simultaneously pronounce different vowels or consonants. The results revealed a response benefit, measured in vocal and manual reaction times, when the responses consisted of front vowels and forward hand movements. Conversely, back vowels were associated with backward hand movements. Articulation of rounded versus unrounded vowels or coronal versus dorsal consonants did not produce the effect. In contrast, when the manual responses of forward-backward hand movements were replaced by precision and power grip responses, the coronal consonants [t] and [r] were associated with the precision grip, whereas the dorsal consonant [k] was associated with the power grip. We propose that the movements of the tongue body, operating mainly for vowel production, share the directional action planning processes with the hand movements. Conversely, the tongue articulators related to tongue tip and dorsum movements, operating mainly for consonant production, share the action planning processes with the precision and power grip, respectively.
  • Vainio, Lari; Tiippana, Kaisa; Tiainen, Mikko; Rantala, Aleksi; Vainio, Martti (2018)
    Research has shown connections between articulatory mouth actions and manual actions. This study investigates whether forward-backward hand movements could be associated with vowel production processes that programme tongue fronting/backing, lip rounding/spreading (Experiment 1), and/or consonant production processes that programme tongue tip and tongue dorsum actions (Experiment 2). The participants had to perform either forward or backward hand movement and simultaneously pronounce different vowels or consonants. The results revealed a response benefit, measured in vocal and manual reaction times, when the responses consisted of front vowels and forward hand movements. Conversely, back vowels were associated with backward hand movements. Articulation of rounded versus unrounded vowels or coronal versus dorsal consonants did not produce the effect. In contrast, when the manual responses of forward-backward hand movements were replaced by precision and power grip responses, the coronal consonants [t] and [r] were associated with the precision grip, whereas the dorsal consonant [k] was associated with the power grip. We propose that the movements of the tongue body, operating mainly for vowel production, share the directional action planning processes with the hand movements. Conversely, the tongue articulators related to tongue tip and dorsum movements, operating mainly for consonant production, share the action planning processes with the precision and power grip, respectively.
  • SCORE Study Grp; Rantalaiho, Ida; Laaksonen, Inari; Launonen, Antti P.; Luokkala, Toni; Flinkkila, Tapio; Salmela, Mikko; Adolfsson, L.; Olsen, Bo; Isotalo, Kari; Ryösä, Anssi; Äärimaa, Ville (2022)
    Introduction The incidence of olecranon fractures is growing in the elderly population. The traditional operative approach is giving way among the elderly to conservative treatment, which seems to provide a comparable functional outcome with a lower complication burden. However, there is still a lack of reliable evidence to support this shift. The objective of this trial is to investigate whether conservative treatment of displaced olecranon fractures in patients aged 75 or older yields comparable results to those of operative treatment in terms of pain and daily function. Methods and analysis Scandinavian Olecranon Research in the Elderly (SCORE) is a randomised, controlled, multicentre, non-inferiority trial. Eligible patients will be randomised to either conservative or operative treatment. The sample size will be 68 patients and allocation done at a 1:1 ratio (34 patients per group). The randomisation is stratified according to the participating hospital and patient's sex. Both groups will receive the same postoperative physiotherapy and pain management. The primary outcome is Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand at 1-year follow-up. Secondary outcomes are pain and satisfaction measured on visual analogue scales, Patient Reported Elbow Evaluation, range of motion of the elbow and extension strength of the elbow compared with the unaffected arm. Radiographs will be taken at each follow-up. Primary analysis of the results will be conducted on an intention-to-treat basis. Ethics and dissemination The study protocol for this clinical trial has been approved by the Ethics Committee of the Hospital District of Southwest Finland and will be submitted for approval to the Regional Ethics Committees in Linkoping, Sweden and Copenhagen, Denmark. Every recruiting centre will apply local research approvals. The results of this study will be submitted for publication in peer-reviewed journals.
  • Sierakowski, Kyra L.; Dean, Nicola R.; Sanchez, Kathleen Evans; Griffin, Philip A.; Wormald, Justin C. R.; Rodrigues, Jeremy N.; Mares, Olivier; Repo, Jussi P.; Hulkkonen, Sina M.; Shah, Neil; Koehler, Steven; Bain, Gregory; Cano, Stefan J.; Pusic, Andrea L.; Lalonde, Don; Klassen, Anne F. (2022)
    Background: The perspective of the patient in measuring the outcome of their hand treatment is of key importance. We developed a hand-specific patient-reported outcome measure to provide a means to measure outcomes and experiences of care from the patient perspective, that is, HAND-Q. Methods: Data were collected from people with a broad range of hand conditions in hand clinics in six countries between April 2018 and January 2021. Rasch measurement theory analysis was used to perform item reduction and to examine reliability and validity of each HAND-Q scale. Results: A sample of 1277 patients was recruited. Participants ranged in age from 16 to 89 years, 54% were women, and a broad range of congenital and acquired hand conditions were represented. Rasch measurement theory analysis led to the refinement of 14 independently functioning scales that measure hand appearance, health-related quality of life, experience of care, and treatment outcome. Each scale evidenced reliability and validity. Examination of differential item functioning by age, gender, language, and type of hand condition (ie, nontraumatic versus traumatic) confirmed that a common scoring algorithm for each scale could be implemented. Conclusions: The HAND-Q was developed following robust psychometric methods to provide a comprehensive modular independently functioning set of scales. HAND-Q scales can be used to assess and compare evidence-based outcomes in patients with any type of hand condition.