Browsing by Subject "ASSOCIATION"

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  • Böttiger, B. W.; Lockey, A.; Aickin, R.; Castren, M.; de Caen, A.; Escalante, R.; Kern, K. B.; Lim, S. H.; Nadkarni, V.; Neumar, R. W.; Nolan, J. P.; Stanton, D.; Wang, T. -L.; Perkins, G. D. (2018)
    "All citizens of the world can save a life". With these words, the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR) is launching the first global initiative - World Restart a Heart (WRAH) - to increase public awareness and therefore the rates of bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) for victims of cardiac arrest. In most of the cases, it takes too long for the emergency services to arrive on scene after the victim's collapse. Thus, the most effective way to increase survival and favourable outcome in cardiac arrest by two-to fourfold is early CPR by lay bystanders and by "first responders". Lay bystander resuscitation rates, however, differ significantly across the world, ranging from 5 to 80%. If all countries could have high lay bystander resuscitation rates, this would help to save hundreds of thousands of lives every year. In order to achieve this goal, all seven ILCOR councils have agreed to participate in WRAH 2018. Besides schoolchildren education in CPR ("KIDS SAVE LIVES"), many other initiatives have already been developed in different parts of the world. ILCOR is keen for the WRAH initiative to be as inclusive as possible, and that it should happen every year on 16 October or as close to that day as possible. Besides recommending CPR training for children and adults, it is hoped that a unified global message will enable our policy makers to take action to address the inequalities in patient survival around the world.
  • Peddinti, Gopal; Bergman, Michael; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Groop, Leif (2019)
    Context: Early prediction of dysglycemia is crucial to prevent progression to type 2 diabetes. The 1-hour postload plasma glucose (PG) is reported to be a better predictor of dysglycemia than fasting plasma glucose (FPG), 2-hour PG, or glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c). Objective: To evaluate the predictive performance of clinical markers, metabolites, HbA1c, and PG and serum insulin (INS) levels during a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Design and Setting: We measured PG and INS levels at 0, 30, 60, and 120 minutes during an OGTT in 543 participants in the Botnia Prospective Study, 146 of whom progressed to type 2 diabetes within a 10-year follow-up period. Using combinations of variables, we evaluated 1527 predictive models for progression to type 2 diabetes. Results: The 1-hour PG outperformed every individual marker except 30-minute PG or mannose, whose predictive performances were lower but not significantly worse. HbA1c was inferior to 1-hour PG according to DeLong test P value but not false discovery rate. Combining the metabolic markers with PG measurements and HbA1c significantly improved the predictive models, and mannose was found to be a robust metabolic marker. Conclusions: The 1-hour PG, alone or in combination with metabolic markers, is a robust predictor for determining the future risk of type 2 diabetes, outperforms the 2-hour PG, and is cheaper to measure than metabolites. Metabolites add to the predictive value of PG and HbA1c measurements. Shortening the standard 75-g OGTT to 1 hour improves its predictive value and clinical usability.
  • Olasveengen, Theresa M.; de Caen, Allan R.; Mancini, Mary E.; Maconochie, Ian K.; Aickin, Richard; Atkins, Dianne L.; Berg, Robert A.; Bingham, Robert M.; Brooks, Steven C.; Castren, Maaret; Chung, Sung Phil; Considine, Julie; Couto, Thomaz Bittencourt; Escalante, Raffo; Gazmuri, Raul J.; Guerguerian, Anne-Marie; Hatanaka, Tetsuo; Koster, Rudolph W.; Kudenchuk, Peter J.; Lang, Eddy; Lim, Swee Han; Lofgren, Bo; Meaney, Peter A.; Montgomery, William H.; Morley, Peter T.; Morrison, Laurie J.; Nation, Kevin J.; Ng, Kee-Chong; Nadkarni, Vinay M.; Nishiyama, Chika; Nuthall, Gabrielle; Ong, Gene Yong-Kwang; Perkins, Gavin D.; Reis, Amelia G.; Ristagno, Giuseppe; Sakamoto, Tetsuya; Sayre, Michael R.; Schexnayder, Stephen M.; Sierra, Alfredo F.; Singletary, Eunice M.; Shimizu, Naoki; Smyth, Michael A.; Stanton, David; Tijssen, Janice A.; Travers, Andrew; Vaillancourt, Christian; Van de Voorde, Patrick; Hazinski, Mary Fran; Nolan, Jerry P.; ILCOR Collaborators (2017)
    The International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation has initiated a near-continuous review of cardiopulmonary resuscitation science that replaces the previous 5-year cyclic batch-and-queue approach process. This is the first of an annual series of International Consensus on Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care Science With Treatment Recommendations summary articles that will include the cardiopulmonary resuscitation science reviewed by the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation in the previous year. The review this year includes 5 basic life support and 1 paediatric Consensuses on Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care Science With Treatment Recommendations. Each of these includes a summary of the science and its quality based on Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation criteria and treatment recommendations. Insights into the deliberations of the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation task force members are provided in Values and Preferences sections. Finally, the task force members have pri-oritised and listed the top 3 knowledge gaps for each population, intervention, comparator, and outcome question. (C) 2017 European Resuscitation Council and American Heart Association, Inc. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
  • Frischknecht, Mirjam; Niehof-Oellers, Helena; Jagannathan, Vidhya; Owczarek-Lipska, Marta; Droegemueller, Cord; Dietschi, Elisabeth; Dolf, Gaudenz; Tellhelm, Bernd; Lang, Johann; Tiira, Katriina; Lohi, Hannes; Leeb, Tosso (2013)
  • Thorgeirsson, T. E.; Gudbjartsson, D. F.; Sulem, P.; Besenbacher, S.; Styrkarsdottir, U.; Thorleifsson, G.; Walters, G. B.; Furberg, H.; Sullivan, P. F.; Marchini, J.; McCarthy, M. I.; Steinthorsdottir, V.; Thorsteinsdottir, U.; Stefansson, K.; TAG Consortium; Oxford-GSK Consortium; ENGAGE Consortium; Kaprio, Jaakko; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Shen, Huei-Yi (2013)
  • Stahlmann, Katharina; Hebestreit, Antje; DeHenauw, Stefaan; Hunsberger, Monica; Kaprio, Jaakko; Lissner, Lauren; Molnar, Denes; Ayala-Marin, Aleli M.; Reisch, Lucia A.; Russo, Paola; Tornaritis, Michael; Veidebaum, Toomas; Pohlabeln, Hermann; Bogl, Leonie H. (2020)
    Background There has been an increase in children growing up in non-traditional families, such as single-parent and blended families. Children from such families have a higher prevalence of obesity and poorer health outcomes, but research on the relationship with obesogenic behaviours is limited. Objectives Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate whether there are associations between family structures and obesogenic behaviours and related family rules in European children and adolescents. Methods The sample included 7664 children (mean age +/- SD: 10.9 +/- 2.9) from 4923 families who were participants of the multi-centre I.Family study (2013/2014) conducted in 8 European countries. Family structure was assessed by a detailed interview on kinship and household. Obesogenic behaviours (screen time, sleep duration, consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs)) and family rules (rules for computer and television, bedtime routine, availability of SSBs during meals) were determined by standardized questionnaires. Multilevel mixed-effects linear and logistic regression models were used to model the associations of family structure with obesogenic behaviours and family rules. Sex, age, parental education level, number of children and adults in the household and BMI z-score were covariates in the models. Two-parent biological families were set as the reference category. Results Children from single-parent families were less likely to have family rules regarding screen time (OR: 0.62, 95% CI: 0.40-0.94, p = 0.026) with higher reported hours of screen time per week (beta = 2.70 h/week, 95% CI: 1.39-4.00, p <0.001). The frequency of weekly SSB consumption differed by family structure in a sex-specific manner: girls from single-parent (beta = 3.19 frequency/week, 95% CI: 0.91-5.47, p = 0.006) and boys from blended/adoptive families (beta = 3.01 frequency/week, 95% CI: 0.99-5.03, p = 0.004) consumed more SSBs. Sleep duration, bedtime routines and availability of SSBs during meals did not differ between children from these family structures. Parental education did not modify any of these associations. Conclusions Parents in non-traditional family structures appear to experience more difficulties in restricting screen time and the intake of SSBs in their children than parents in traditional two-parent family structures. Our findings therefore suggest that additional support and effective strategies for parents in non-traditional families may help to reduce obesogenic behaviours in children from such family types.
  • Hayes, A.; Nguyen, D.; Andersson, M.; Anton, A.; Bailly, J-L; Beard, S.; Benschop, K. S. M.; Berginc, N.; Blomqvist, S.; Cunningham, E.; Davis, D.; Dembinski, J. L.; Diedrich, S.; Dudman, S. G.; Dyrdak, R.; Eltringham, G. J. A.; Gonzales-Goggia, S.; Gunson, R.; Howson-Wells, H. C.; Jääskeläinen, A. J.; Lopez-Labrador, F. X.; Maier, M.; Majumdar, M.; Midgley, S.; Mirand, A.; Morley, U.; Nordbo, S. A.; Oikarinen, S.; Osman, H.; Papa, A.; Pellegrinelli, L.; Piralla, A.; Rabella, N.; Richter, J.; Smith, M.; Strand, A. Söderlund; Templeton, K.; Vipond, B.; Vuorinen, T.; Williams, C.; Wollants, E.; Zakikhany, K.; Fischer, T. K.; Harvala, H.; Simmonds, P. (2020)
    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) detection has become the gold standard for diagnosis and typing of enterovirus (EV) and human parechovirus (HPeV) infections. Its effectiveness depends critically on using the appropriate sample types and high assay sensitivity as viral loads in cerebrospinal fluid samples from meningitis and sepsis clinical presentation can be extremely low. This study evaluated the sensitivity and specificity of currently used commercial and in-house diagnostic and typing assays. Accurately quantified RNA transcript controls were distributed to 27 diagnostic and 12 reference laboratories in 17 European countries for blinded testing. Transcripts represented the four human EV species (EV-A71, echovirus 30, coxsackie A virus 21, and EV-D68), HPeV3, and specificity controls. Reported results from 48 in-house and 15 commercial assays showed 98% detection frequencies of high copy (1000 RNA copies/5 mu L) transcripts. In-house assays showed significantly greater detection frequencies of the low copy (10 copies/5 mu L) EV and HPeV transcripts (81% and 86%, respectively) compared with commercial assays (56%, 50%; P = 7 x 10(-5)). EV-specific PCRs showed low cross-reactivity with human rhinovirus C (3 of 42 tests) and infrequent positivity in the negative control (2 of 63 tests). Most or all high copy EV and HPeV controls were successfully typed (88%, 100%) by reference laboratories, but showed reduced effectiveness for low copy controls (41%, 67%). Stabilized RNA transcripts provide an effective, logistically simple and inexpensive reagent for evaluation of diagnostic assay performance. The study provides reassurance of the performance of the many in-house assay formats used across Europe. However, it identified often substantially reduced sensitivities of commercial assays often used as point-of-care tests.
  • Vanhatalo, Jarno; Li, Zitong; Sillanpää, Mikko J. (2019)
    Motivation: Recent advances in high dimensional phenotyping bring time as an extra dimension into the phenotypes. This promotes the quantitative trait locus (QTL) studies of function-valued traits such as those related to growth and development. Existing approaches for analyzing functional traits utilize either parametric methods or semi-parametric approaches based on splines and wavelets. However, very limited choices of software tools are currently available for practical implementation of functional QTL mapping and variable selection. Results: We propose a Bayesian Gaussian process (GP) approach for functional QTL mapping. We use GPs to model the continuously varying coefficients which describe how the effects of molecular markers on the quantitative trait are changing over time. We use an efficient gradient based algorithm to estimate the tuning parameters of GPs. Notably, the GP approach is directly applicable to the incomplete datasets having even larger than 50% missing data rate (among phenotypes). We further develop a stepwise algorithm to search through the model space in terms of genetic variants, and use a minimal increase of Bayesian posterior probability as a stopping rule to focus on only a small set of putative QTL. We also discuss the connection between GP and penalized B-splines and wavelets. On two simulated and three real datasets, our GP approach demonstrates great flexibility for modeling different types of phenotypic trajectories with low computational cost. The proposed model selection approach finds the most likely QTL reliably in tested datasets.
  • Khrunin, Andrey V.; Khokhrin, Denis V.; Filippova, Irina N.; Esko, Tonu; Nelis, Mari; Bebyakova, Natalia A.; Bolotova, Natalia L.; Klovins, Janis; Nikitina-Zake, Liene; Rehnström, Karola Hannele; Ripatti, Samuli; Schreiber, Stefan; Franke, Andre; Macek, Milan; Krulisova, Veronika; Lubinski, Jan; Metspalu, Andres; Limborska, Svetlana A. (2013)
  • Surakka, Ida; Isaacs, Aaron; Karssen, Lennart C.; Laurila, Pirkka-Pekka P.; Middelberg, Rita P. S.; Tikkanen, Emmi; Ried, Janina S.; Lamina, Claudia; Mangino, Massimo; Igl, Wilmar; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Lagou, Vasiliki; van der Harst, Pim; Leach, Irene Mateo; Esko, Tonu; Kutalik, Zoltan; Wainwright, Nicholas W.; Struchalin, Maksim V.; Sarin, Antti-Pekka; Kangas, Antti J.; Viikari, Jorma S.; Perola, Markus; Rantanen, Taina; Petersen, Ann-Kristin; Soininen, Pasi; Johansson, Asa; Soranzo, Nicole; Heath, Andrew C.; Papamarkou, Theodore; Prokopenko, Inga; Toenjes, Anke; Kronenberg, Florian; Doering, Angela; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Montgomery, Grant W.; Whitfield, John B.; Kahonen, Mika; Lehtimaki, Terho; Freimer, Nelson B.; Willemsen, Gonneke; de Geus, Eco J. C.; Palotie, Aarno; Sandhu, Manj S.; Waterworth, Dawn M.; Metspalu, Andres; Stumvoll, Michael; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Jula, Antti; Navis, Gerjan; Wijmenga, Cisca; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H. R.; Taskinen, Marja-Riitta; Ala-Korpela, Mika; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kyvik, Kirsten O.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Gyllensten, Ulf; Wilson, James F.; Rudan, Igor; Campbell, Harry; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Spector, Tim D.; Witteman, Jacqueline C. M.; Eriksson, Johan G.; Salomaa, Veikko; Oostra, Ben A.; Raitakari, Olli T.; Wichmann, H. -Erich; Gieger, Christian; Jaervelin, Marjo-Riitta; Martin, Nicholas G.; Hofman, Albert; McCarthy, Mark I.; Palotie, Leena; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Aulchenko, Yurii S.; Ripatti, Samuli (2011)
  • Perälä, Mia-Maria; von Bonsdorff, Mikaela; Männistö, Satu; Salonen, Minna; Simonen, Mika; Kanerva, Noora Karoliina; Pohjolainen, Pertti; Kajantie, Eero Olavi; Rantanen, Taina; Eriksson, Johan Gunnar (2016)
    Epidemiological studies have shown that a number of nutrients are associated with better physical performance. However, little is still known about the role of the whole diet, particularly a healthy Nordic diet, in relation to physical performance. Therefore, we examined whether a healthy Nordic diet was associated with measures of physical performance 10 years later. We studied 1072 participants from the Helsinki Birth Cohort Study. Participants' diet was assessed using a validated 128-item FFQ at the mean age of 61 years, and a priori-defined Nordic diet score (NDS) was calculated. The score included Nordic fruits and berries, vegetables, cereals, PUFA:SFA and trans-fatty acids ratio, low-fat milk, fish, red and processed meat, total fat and alcohol. At the mean age of 71 years, participants' physical performance was measured using the Senior Fitness Test (SFT), and an overall SFT score was calculated. Women in the highest fourth of the NDS had on average 5 points higher SFT score compared with those in the lowest fourth (P-for trend 0.005). No such association was observed in men. Women with the highest score had 17% better result in the 6-min walk test, 16% better arm curl and 20% better chair stand results compared with those with the lowest score (all P values <0.01). In conclusion, a healthy Nordic diet was associated with better overall physical performance among women and might help decrease the risk of disability in old age.
  • Deelen, Joris; Kettunen, Johannes; Fischer, Krista; van der Spek, Ashley; Trompet, Stella; Kastenmueller, Gabi; Boyd, Andy; Zierer, Jonas; van den Akker, Erik B.; Ala-Korpela, Mika; Amin, Najaf; Demirkan, Ayse; Ghanbari, Mohsen; van Heemst, Diana; Ikram, M. Arfan; van Klinken, Jan Bert; Mooijaart, Simon P.; Peters, Annette; Salomaa, Veikko; Sattar, Naveed; Spector, Tim D.; Tiemeier, Henning; Verhoeven, Aswin; Waldenberger, Melanie; Wuertz, Peter; Smith, George Davey; Metspalu, Andres; Perola, Markus; Menni, Cristina; Geleijnse, Johanna M.; Drenos, Fotios; Beekman, Marian; Jukema, J. Wouter; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Slagboom, P. Eline (2019)
    Predicting longer-term mortality risk requires collection of clinical data, which is often cumbersome. Therefore, we use a well-standardized metabolomics platform to identify metabolic predictors of long-term mortality in the circulation of 44,168 individuals (age at baseline 18-109), of whom 5512 died during follow-up. We apply a stepwise (forward-backward) procedure based on meta-analysis results and identify 14 circulating biomarkers independently associating with all-cause mortality. Overall, these associations are similar in men and women and across different age strata. We subsequently show that the prediction accuracy of 5- and 10-year mortality based on a model containing the identified biomarkers and sex (C-statistic = 0.837 and 0.830, respectively) is better than that of a model containing conventional risk factors for mortality (C-statistic = 0.772 and 0.790, respectively). The use of the identified metabolic profile as a predictor of mortality or surrogate endpoint in clinical studies needs further investigation.
  • Leeb, Tosso; Leuthard, Fabienne; Jagannathan, Vidhya; Kiener, Sarah; Letko, Anna; Roosje, Petra; Welle, Monika M.; Gailbreath, Katherine L.; Cannon, Andrea; Linek, Monika; Banovic, Frane; Olivry, Thierry; White, Stephen D.; Batcher, Kevin; Bannasch, Danika; Minor, Katie M.; Mickelson, James R.; Hytönen, Marjo K.; Lohi, Hannes; Mauldin, Elizabeth A.; Casal, Margret L. (2020)
    Cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE) in humans encompasses multiple subtypes that exhibit a wide array of skin lesions and, in some cases, are associated with the development of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We investigated dogs with exfoliative cutaneous lupus erythematosus (ECLE), a dog-specific form of chronic CLE that is inherited as a monogenic autosomal recessive trait. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) with 14 cases and 29 controls confirmed a previously published result that the causative variant maps to chromosome 18. Autozygosity mapping refined the ECLE locus to a 493 kb critical interval. Filtering of whole genome sequence data from two cases against 654 controls revealed a single private protein-changing variant in this critical interval, UNC93B1:c.1438C>A or p.Pro480Thr. The homozygous mutant genotype was exclusively observed in 23 ECLE affected German Shorthaired Pointers and an ECLE affected Vizsla, but absent from 845 controls. UNC93B1 is a transmembrane protein located in the endoplasmic reticulum and endolysosomes, which is required for correct trafficking of several Toll-like receptors (TLRs). The p.Pro480Thr variant is predicted to affect the C-terminal tail of the UNC93B1 that has recently been shown to restrict TLR7 mediated autoimmunity via an interaction with syndecan binding protein (SDCBP). The functional knowledge on UNC93B1 strongly suggests that p.Pro480Thr is causing ECLE in dogs. These dogs therefore represent an interesting spontaneous model for human lupus erythematosus. Our results warrant further investigations of whether genetic variants affecting the C-terminus of UNC93B1 might be involved in specific subsets of CLE or SLE cases in humans and other species.
  • Drug-Induced Liver Injury Network; Int DILI Consortium iDILIC; Cirulli, Elizabeth T.; Nicoletti, Paola; Laitinen, Tarja (2019)
    BACKGROUND & AIMS: We performed genetic analyses of a multiethnic cohort of patients with idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury (DILI) to identify variants associated with susceptibility. METHODS: We performed a genome-wide association study of 2048 individuals with DILI (cases) and 12,429 individuals without (controls). Our analysis included subjects of European (1806 cases and 10,397 controls), African American (133 cases and 1,314 controls), and Hispanic (109 cases and 718 controls) ancestry. We analyzed DNA from 113 Icelandic cases and 239,304 controls to validate our findings. RESULTS: We associated idiosyncratic DILI with rs2476601, a nonsynonymous polymorphism that encodes a substitution of tryptophan with arginine in the protein tyrosine phosphatase, nonreceptor type 22 gene (PTPN22) (odds ratio [OR] 1.44; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.28-1.62; P = 1.2 x 10(-9) and replicated the finding in the validation set (OR 1.48; 95% CI 1.09-1.99; P =.01). The minor allele frequency showed the same effect size (OR > 1) among ethnic groups. The strongest association was with amoxicillin and clavulanate-associated DILI in persons of European ancestry (OR 1.62; 95% CI 1.32-1.98; P = 4.0 x 10(-6); allele frequency = 13.3%), but the polymorphism was associated with DILI of other causes (OR 1.37; 95% CI 1.21-1.56; P = 1.5 x 10(-6); allele frequency = 11.5%). Among amoxicillin-and clavulanate-associated cases of European ancestry, rs2476601 doubled the risk for DILI among those with the HLA risk alleles A* 02: 01 and DRB1* 15: 01. CONCLUSIONS: In a genome-wide association study, we identified rs2476601 in PTPN22 as a non-HLA variant that associates with risk of liver injury caused by multiple drugs and validated our finding in a separate cohort. This variant has been associated with increased risk of autoimmune diseases, providing support for the concept that alterations in immune regulation contribute to idiosyncratic DILI.
  • LifeLines Cohort Study; Sung, Yun Ju; Heikkinen, Sami; Koistinen, Heikki A. (2019)
    Elevated blood pressure (BP), a leading cause of global morbidity and mortality, is influenced by both genetic and lifestyle factors. Cigarette smoking is one such lifestyle factor. Across five ancestries, we performed a genome-wide gene-smoking interaction study of mean arterial pressure (MAP) and pulse pressure (PP) in 129 913 individuals in stage 1 and follow-up analysis in 480 178 additional individuals in stage 2. We report here 136 loci significantly associated with MAP and/or PP. Of these, 61 were previously published through main-effect analysis of BP traits, 37 were recently reported by us for systolic BP and/or diastolic BP through gene-smoking interaction analysis and 38 were newly identified (P <5 x 10(-8), false discovery rate <0.05). We also identified nine new signals near known loci. Of the 136 loci, 8 showed significant interaction with smoking status. They include CSMD1 previously reported for insulin resistance and BP in the spontaneously hypertensive rats. Many of the 38 new loci show biologic plausibility for a role in BP regulation. SLC26A7 encodes a chloride/bicarbonate exchanger expressed in the renal outer medullary collecting duct. AVPR1A is widely expressed, including in vascular smooth muscle cells, kidney, myocardium and brain. FHAD1 is a long non-coding RNA overexpressed in heart failure. TMEM51 was associated with contractile function in cardiomyocytes. CASP9 plays a central role in cardiomyocyte apoptosis. Identified only in African ancestry were 30 novel loci. Our findings highlight the value of multi-ancestry investigations, particularly in studies of interaction with lifestyle factors, where genomic and lifestyle differences may contribute to novel findings.
  • Wendt, Frank R.; Novroski, Nicole M. M.; Rahikainen, Anna-Liina; Sajantila, Antti; Budowle, Bruce (2019)
    Predicting metabolizer phenotype (MP) is typically performed using data from a single gene. Cytochrome p450 family 2 subfamily D polypeptide 6 (CYP2D6) is considered the primary gene for predicting MP in reference to approximately 30% of marketed drugs and endogenous toxins. CYP2D6 predictions have proven clinically effective but also have well-documented inaccuracies due to relatively high genotype-phenotype discordance in certain populations. Herein, a pathway-driven predictive model employs genetic data from uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase, family 1, polypeptide B7 (UGT2B7), adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette, subfamily B, number 1 (ABCB1), opioid receptor mu 1 (OPRM1), and catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) to predict the tramadol to primary metabolite ratio (T:M1) and the resulting toxicologically inferred MP (t-MP). These data were then combined with CYP2D6 data to evaluate performance of a fully combinatorial model relative to CYP2D6 alone. These data identify UGT2B7 as a potentially significant explanatory marker for T:M1 variability in a population of tramadol-exposed individuals of Finnish ancestry. Supervised machine learning and feature selection were used to demonstrate that a set of 16 loci from 5 genes can predict t-MP with over 90% accuracy, depending on t-MP category and algorithm, which was significantly greater than predictions made by CYP2D6 alone.
  • Hebbar, Prashantha; Abubaker, Jehad Ahmed; Abu-Farha, Mohamed; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Al-Mulla, Fahd; Thanaraj, Thangavel Alphonse (2019)
    Despite dedicated nation-wide efforts to raise awareness against the harmful effects of fast-food consumption and sedentary lifestyle, the Arab population continues to struggle with an increased risk for metabolic disorders. Unlike the European population, the Arab population lacks well-established genetic risk determinants for metabolic disorders, and the transferability of established risk loci to this population has not been satisfactorily demonstrated. The most recent findings have identified over 240 genetic risk loci (with similar to 400 independent association signals) for type 2 diabetes, but thus far only 25 risk loci (ADAMTS9, ALX4, BCL11A, CDKAL1, CDKN2A/B, COL8A1, DUSP9, FTO, GCK, GNPDA2, HMG20A, HNF1A, HNF1B, HNF4A, IGF2BP2, JAZF1, KCNJ11 , KCNQ1, MC4R, PPAR gamma, SLC30A8, TCF7L2, TFAP2B, TP53INP1, and WFS1) have been replicated in Arab populations. To our knowledge, large-scale population- or family-based association studies are non-existent in this region. Recently, we conducted genome-wide association studies on Arab individuals from Kuwait to delineate the genetic determinants for quantitative traits associated with anthropometry, lipid profile, insulin resistance, and blood pressure levels. Although these studies led to the identification of novel recessive variants, they failed to reproduce the established loci. However, they provided insights into the genetic architecture of the population, the applicability of genetic models based on recessive mode of inheritance, the presence of genetic signatures of inbreeding due to the practice of consanguinity, and the pleiotropic effects of rare disorders on complex metabolic disorders. This perspective presents analysis strategies and study designs for identifying genetic risk variants associated with diabetes and related traits in Arab populations.
  • Lång, M.; Skrifvars, M. B.; Siironen, J.; Tanskanen, P.; Ala-Peijari, M.; Koivisto, T.; Djafarzadeh, S.; Bendel, S. (2018)
    BackgroundNormobaric hyperoxia is used to alleviate secondary brain ischaemia in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI), but clinical evidence is limited and hyperoxia may cause adverse events. MethodsAn open label, randomised controlled pilot study comparing blood concentrations of reactive oxygen species (ROS), interleukin 6 (IL-6) and neuron-specific enolase (NSE) between two different fractions of inspired oxygen in severe TBI patients on mechanical ventilation. ResultsWe enrolled 27 patients in the Fi O-2 0.40 group and 38 in the Fi O-2 0.70 group; 19 and 23 patients, respectively, completed biochemical analyses. In baseline, there were no differences between Fi O-2 0.40 and Fi O-2 0.70 groups, respectively, in ROS (64.8 nM [22.6-102.1] vs. 64.9 nM [26.8-96.3], P = 0.80), IL-6 (group 92.4 pg/ml [52.9-171.6] vs. 94.3 pg/ml [54.8-133.1], P = 0.52) or NSE (21.04 ug/l [14.0-30.7] vs. 17.8 ug/l [14.1-23.9], P = 0.35). ROS levels did not differ at Day 1 (24.2 nM [20.6-33.5] vs. 29.2 nM [22.7-69.2], P = 0.10) or at Day 2 (25.4 nM [21.7-37.4] vs. 47.3 nM [34.4-126.1], P = 0.95). IL-6 concentrations did not differ at Day 1 (112.7 pg/ml [65.9-168.9) vs. 83.9 pg/ml [51.8-144.3], P = 0.41) or at Day 3 (55.0 pg/ml [34.2-115.6] vs. 49.3 pg/ml [34.4-126.1], P = 0.95). NSE levels did not differ at Day 1 (15.9 ug/l [9.0-24.3] vs. 15.3 ug/l [12.2-26.3], P = 0.62). There were no differences between groups in the incidence of pulmonary complications. ConclusionHigher fraction of inspired oxygen did not increase blood concentrations of markers of oxidative stress, inflammation or neurological injury or the incidence of pulmonary complications in severe TBI patients on mechanical ventilation.