Browsing by Subject "ATELECTASIS"

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  • Babini, Giovanni; Ristagno, Giuseppe; Boccardo, Antonio; De Giorgio, Daria; De Maglie, Marcella; Affatato, Roberta; Ceriani, Sabina; Zani, Davide; Novelli, Deborah; Staszewsky, Lidia; Masson, Serge; Pravettoni, Davide; Latini, Roberto; Belloli, Angelo; Scanziani, Eugenio; Skrifvars, Markus (2019)
    Aim of the study: To evaluate in an established porcine post cardiac arrest model the effect of a mild hypercapnic ventilatory strategy on outcome. Methods: The left anterior descending coronary artery was occluded in 14 pigs and ventricular fibrillation induced and left untreated for 12 min. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation was performed for 5 min prior to defibrillation. After resuscitation, pigs were assigned to either normocapnic (end-tidal carbon dioxide (EtCO2) target: 35-40 mmHg) or hypercapnic ventilation (EtCO2 45-50 mmHg). Hemodynamics was invasively measured and EtCO2 was monitored with an infrared capnometer. Blood gas analysis, serum neuron-specific enolase (NSE) and high sensitive cardiac troponin T (hs-cTnT) were assessed. Survival and functional recovery were evaluated up to 96 h. Results: Twelve pigs were successfully resuscitated and eight survived up to 96 h, with animals in the hypercapnic group showing trend towards a longer survival. EtCO2 and arterial partial pressure of CO2 were higher in the hypercapnic group compared to the normocapnic one (p <0.01), during the 4-hour intervention. Hypercapnia was associated with higher mean arterial pressure compared to normocapnia (p <0.05). No significant differences were observed in hs-cTnT and in NSE between groups, although the values tended to be lower in the hypercapnic one. Neuronal degeneration was lesser in the frontal cortex of hypercapnic animals compared to the normocapnic ones (p <0.05). Neurological recovery was equivalent in the two groups. Conclusion: Mild hypercapnia after resuscitation was associated with better arterial pressure and lesser neuronal degeneration in this model. Nevertheless, no corresponding improvements in neurological recovery were observed.
  • HOT-ICU Investigators; Schjorring, Olav L.; Perner, Anders; Wetterslev, Jorn; Lange, Theis; Keus, Frederik; Laake, Jon H.; Okkonen, Marjatta; Siegemund, Martin; Morgan, Matthew; Thormar, Katrin M.; Rasmussen, Bodil S. (2019)
    Background Acutely ill adults with hypoxaemic respiratory failure are at risk of life-threatening hypoxia, and thus oxygen is often administered liberally. Excessive oxygen use may, however, increase the number of serious adverse events, including death. Establishing the optimal oxygenation level is important as existing evidence is of low quality. We hypothesise that targeting an arterial partial pressure of oxygen (PaO2) of 8 kPa is superior to targeting a PaO2 of 12 kPa in adult intensive care unit (ICU) patients with acute hypoxaemic respiratory failure. Methods The Handling Oxygenation Targets in the ICU (HOT-ICU) trial is an outcome assessment blinded, multicentre, randomised, parallel-group trial targeting PaO2 in acutely ill adults with hypoxaemic respiratory failure within 12 hours after ICU admission. Patients are randomised 1:1 to one of the two PaO2 targets throughout ICU stay until a maximum of 90 days. The primary outcome is 90-day mortality. Secondary outcomes are serious adverse events in the ICU, days alive without organ support and days alive out of hospital in the 90-day period; mortality, health-related quality-of-life at 1-year follow-up as well as 1-year cognitive and pulmonary function in a subgroup; and an overall health economic analysis. To detect or reject a 20% relative risk reduction, we aim to include 2928 patients. An interim analysis is planned after 90-day follow-up of 1464 patients. Conclusion The HOT-ICU trial will test the hypothesis that a lower oxygenation target reduces 90-day mortality compared with a higher oxygenation target in adult ICU patients with acute hypoxaemic respiratory failure.