Browsing by Subject "ATHEROSCLEROSIS"

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  • Inouye, Michael; Silander, Kaisa; Hämäläinen, Eija; Salomaa, Veikko; Harald, Kennet; Jousilahti, Pekka; Mannisto, Satu; Eriksson, Johan G.; Saarela, Janna; Ripatti, Samuli; Perola, Markus; van Ommen, Gert-Jan B.; Taskinen, Marja-Riitta; Palotie, Aarno; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T.; Peltonen, Leena (2010)
  • Karjalainen, Minna K.; Holmes, Michael V.; Wang, Qin; Anufrieva, Olga; Kähönen, Mika; Lehtimäki, Terho; Havulinna, Aki S.; Kristiansson, Kati; Salomaa, Veikko; Perola, Markus; Viikari, Jorma S.; Raitakari, Olli T.; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Ala-Korpela, Mika; Kettunen, Johannes (2020)
    Background and aims: Apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) infusions represent a potential novel therapeutic approach for the prevention of coronary artery disease (CAD). Although circulating apoA-I concentrations inversely associate with risk of CAD, the evidence base of this representing a causal relationship is lacking. The aim was to assess the causal role of apoA-I using human genetics. Methods: We identified a variant (rs12225230) in APOA1 locus that associated with circulating apoA-I concentrations (p <5 x 10(-8)) in 20,370 Finnish participants, and meta-analyzed our data with a previous GWAS of apoA-I. We obtained genetic estimates of CAD from UK Biobank and CARDIoGRAMplusC4D (totaling 122,733 CAD cases) and conducted a two-sample Mendelian randomization analysis. We compared our genetic findings to observational associations of apoA-I with risk of CAD in 918 incident CAD cases among 11,535 individuals from population-based prospective cohorts. Results: ApoA-I was associated with a lower risk of CAD in observational analyses (HR 0.81; 95%CI: 0.75, 0.88; per 1-SD higher apoA-I), with the association showing a dose-response relationship. Rs12225230 associated with apoA-I concentrations (per-C allele beta 0.076 SD; SE: 0.013; p = 1.5 x 10(-9)) but not with confounders. In Mendelian randomization analyses, apoA-I was not related to risk of CAD (OR 1.13; 95%CI: 0.98,1.30 per 1-SD higher apoA-I), which was different from the observational association. Similar findings were observed using an independent ABCA1 variant in sensitivity analysis. Conclusions: Genetic evidence fails to support a cardioprotective role for apoA-I. This is in line with the cumulative evidence showing that HDL-related phenotypes are unlikely to have a protective role in CAD.
  • Takatalo, Jani; Karppinen, Jaro; Taimela, Simo; Niinimaki, Jaakko; Laitinen, Jaana; Sequeiros, Roberto Blanco; Samartzis, Dino; Korpelainen, Raija; Nayha, Simo; Remes, Jouko; Tervonen, Osmo (2013)
  • Halonen, Jaana I.; Dehbi, Hakim-Moulay; Hansell, Anna L.; Gulliver, John; Fecht, Daniela; Blangiardo, Marta; Kelly, Frank J.; Chaturvedi, Nish; Kivimaki, Mika; Tonne, Cathryn (2017)
    Background: Road traffic noise has been linked to increased risk of stroke, for which hypertension and carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) are risk factors. A link between traffic noise and hypertension has been established, but there are few studies on blood pressure and no studies on cIMT. Objectives: To examine cross-sectional associations for long-term exposure to night-time noise with cIMT, systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and hypertension. Methods: The study population consisted of 2592 adults from the Whitehall II and SABRE cohort studies living within Greater London who had cIMT, SBP and DBP measured. Exposure to night-time road traffic noise (A-weighted dB, referred to as dBA) was estimated at each participant's residential postcode centroid. Results: Mean night-time road noise levels were 52 dBA (SD=4). In the pooled analysis adjusted for cohort, sex, age, ethnicity, marital status, smoking, area-level deprivation and NOx there was a 9.1 mu m (95% CI: -7.1, 25.2) increase in cIMT in association with 10 dBA increase in night-time noise. Analyses by noise categories of 5560 dBA (16.2 mu m, 95% CI:-8.7, 41.2), and N60 dBA (21.2 mu m, 95% CI:-2.5, 44.9) vs. 60 dBA vs. Conclusions: After adjustments, including for air pollution, the association between night-time road traffic noise and cIMT was only observed among non-medication users but associations with blood pressure and hypertension were largely null. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • Simonsen, Johan Rasmus; Järvinen, Asko; Hietala, Kustaa; Harjutsalo, Valma; Forsblom, Carol; Groop, Per-Henrik; Lehto, Markku (2021)
    Background/Aims Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is associated and shares many risk factors with other diabetic complications, including inflammation. Bacterial infections, potent inducers of inflammation have been associated with the development of diabetic complications apart from DR. Our aim was to investigate the association between bacterial infections and DR. Methods Adult individuals with type 1 diabetes (n=1043) were recruited from the Finnish Diabetic Nephropathy Study (FinnDiane), a prospective follow-up study. DR was defined as incident severe diabetic retinopathy (SDR), identified as first laser treatment. Data on DR were obtained through fundus photographs and medical records, data on bacterial infections from comprehensive national registries (1 January 1995 to 31 December 2015). Risk factors for DR and serum bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) activity were determined at baseline. Results Individuals with incident SDR (n=413) had a higher mean number of antibiotic purchases/follow-up year compared with individuals without incident SDR (n=630) (0.92 [95% CI 0.82 to 1.02] vs 0.67 [0.62-0.73], p=0.02), as well as higher levels of LPS activity (0.61 [0.58-0.65] vs 0.56 [0.54-0.59] EU/mL, p=0.03). Individuals with on average >= 1 purchase per follow-up year (n=269) had 1.5 times higher cumulative incidence of SDR, compared with individuals with
  • Latorre, Jèssica; Ortega, Francisco J.; Liñares-Pose, Laura; Moreno-Navarrete, José M.; Lluch, Aina; Comas, Ferran; Oliveras-Cañellas, Núria; Ricart, Wifredo; Höring, Marcus; Zhou, You; Liebisch, Gerhard; Nidhina Haridas, P.A.; Olkkonen, Vesa M.; López, Miguel; Fernández-Real, José M. (2020)
    Background: While the impact of metformin in hepatocytes leads to fatty acid (FA) oxidation and decreased lipogenesis, hepatic microRNAs (miRNAs) have been associated with fat overload and impaired metabolism, contributing to the pathogenesis of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Methods: We investigated the expression of hundreds of miRNAs in primary hepatocytes challenged by compounds modulating steatosis, palmitic acid and compound C (as inducers), and metformin (as an inhibitor). Then, additional hepatocyte and rodent models were evaluated, together with transient mimic miRNAs transfection, lipid droplet staining, thin-layer chromatography, quantitative lipidomes, and mitochondrial activity, while human samples outlined the translational significance of this work. Findings: Our results show that treatments triggering fat accumulation and AMPK disruption may compromise the biosynthesis of hepatic miRNAs, while the knockdown of the miRNA-processing enzyme DICER in human hepatocytes exhibited increased lipid deposition. In this context, the ectopic recovery of miR-30b and miR-30c led to significant changes in genes related to FA metabolism, consistent reduction of ceramides, higher mitochondrial activity, and enabled b-oxidation, redirecting FA metabolism fromenergy storage to expenditure. Interpretation: Current findings unravel the biosynthesis of hepatic miR-30b and miR-30c in tackling inadequate FA accumulation, offering a potential avenue for the treatment of NAFLD. Funding: Instituto de Salud Carlos III (ISCIII), Govern de la Generalitat (PERIS2016), Associacio Catalana de Diabetis (ACD), Sociedad Espanola de Diabetes (SED), Fondo Europeo de Desarrollo Regional (FEDER), Xunta de Galicia, Ministerio de Economia y Competitividad (MINECO), "La Caixa" Foundation, and CIBER de la Fisiopatologia de la Obesidad y Nutricion (CIBEROBN). (c) 2020 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license. (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/)
  • Uusitalo, Valtteri; Kamperidis, Vasileios; de Graaf, Michiel A.; Maaniitty, Teemu; Stenstrom, Iida; Broersen, Alexander; Dijkstra, Jouke; Scholte, Arthur J.; Saraste, Antti; Bax, Jeroen J.; Knuuti, Juhani (2017)
    Background: We evaluated the prognostic value of an integrated atherosclerosis risk score combining the markers of coronary plaque burden, location and composition as assessed by computed tomography angiography (CTA). Methods: 922 consecutive patients underwent CTA for suspected coronary artery disease (CAD). Patients without atherosclerosis (n = 261) and in whom quantitative CTA analysis was not feasible due to image quality, step-artefacts or technical factors related to image acquisition or data storage (n = 153) were excluded. Thus, final study group consisted of 508 patients aged 63 9 years. Coronary plaque location, severity and composition for each coronary segment were identified using automated CTA quantification software and integrated in a single CTA score (0-42). Adverse events (AE) including death, myocardial infarction (MI) and unstable angina (UA) were obtained from the national healthcare statistics. Results: There were a total of 20 (4%) AE during a median follow-up of 3.6 years (9 deaths, 5 MI and 6 UA). The CTA risk score was divided into tertiles: 0-6.7, 6.8-14.8 and > 14.8, respectively. All MI (n = 5) and most of the other AE occurred in the highest risk score tertile (3 vs. 3 vs. 14, p = 0.002). After correction for age and gender, the CTA risk score remained independently associated with AE. Conclusions: Comprehensive CIA risk score integrating the location, burden and composition of coronary atherosclerosis predicts future cardiac events in patients with suspected CAD. (C) 2017 Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
  • Ohukainen, Pauli; Kuusisto, Sanna; Kettunen, Johannes; Perola, Markus; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Makinen, Ville-Petteri; Ala-Korpela, Mika (2020)
    Background and aims: Population subgrouping has been suggested as means to improve coronary heart disease (CHD) risk assessment. We explored here how unsupervised data-driven metabolic subgrouping, based on comprehensive lipoprotein subclass data, would work in large-scale population cohorts. Methods: We applied a self-organizing map (SOM) artificial intelligence methodology to define subgroups based on detailed lipoprotein profiles in a population-based cohort (n = 5789) and utilised the trained SOM in an independent cohort (n = 7607). We identified four SOM-based subgroups of individuals with distinct lipoprotein profiles and CHD risk and compared those to univariate subgrouping by apolipoprotein B quartiles. Results: The SOM-based subgroup with highest concentrations for non-HDL measures had the highest, and the subgroup with lowest concentrations, the lowest risk for CHD. However, apolipoprotein B quartiles produced better resolution of risk than the SOM-based subgroups and also striking dose-response behaviour. Conclusions: These results suggest that the majority of lipoprotein-mediated CHD risk is explained by apolipoprotein B-containing lipoprotein particles. Therefore, even advanced multivariate subgrouping, with comprehensive data on lipoprotein metabolism, may not advance CHD risk assessment
  • Soder, Birgitta; Meurman, Jukka H.; Soder, Per-Osten (2014)
  • Soder, Birgitta; Meurman, Jukka H.; Soder, Per-Osten (2016)
    Objectives Dental infections, such as periodontitis, associate with atherosclerosis and its complications. We studied a cohort followed-up since 1985 for incidence of angina pectoris with the hypothesis that calculus accumulation, proxy for poor oral hygiene, links to this symptom. Methods In our Swedish prospective cohort study of 1676 randomly selected subjects followed-up for 26 years. In 1985 all subjects underwent clinical oral examination and answered a questionnaire assessing background variables such as socio-economic status and pack-years of smoking. By using data from the Center of Epidemiology, Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare, Sweden we analyzed the association of oral health parameters with the prevalence of in-hospital verified angina pectoris classified according to the WHO International Classification of Diseases, using descriptive statistics and logistic regression analysis. Results Of the 1676 subjects, 51 (28 women/23 men) had been diagnosed with angina pectoris at a mean age of 59.8 +/- 2.9 years. No difference was observed in age and gender between patients with angina pectoris and subjects without. Neither was there any difference in education level and smoking habits (in pack years), Gingival index and Plaque index between the groups. Angina pectoris patients had significantly more often their first maxillary molar tooth extracted (d. 16) than the other subjects (p = 0.02). Patients also showed significantly higher dental calculus index values than the subjects without angina pectoris (p = 0.01). Multiple regression analysis showed odds ratio 2.21 (95% confidence interval 1.17-4.17) in the association between high calculus index and angina pectoris (p = 0.015). Conclusion Our study hypothesis was confirmed by showing for the first time that high dental calculus score indeed associated with the incidence of angina pectoris in this cohort study.
  • Elfving, P.; Puolakka, K.; Kautiainen, H.; Virta, L. J.; Pohjolainen, T.; Kaipiainen-Seppanen, O. (2016)
    The objectives of the study were to examine the initial, first-year anti-rheumatic outpatient therapy in patients with incident SLE, as well as the concomitant use of drugs for certain comorbidities, compared to the use in the general population. The Finnish nationwide register data on special reimbursements for medication costs was screened to identify the inception cohort of 566 adult SLE patients (87% females, mean age 46.5 +/- 15.9 years) over the years 2000-2007. The patients were linked to the national Drug Purchase Register. Of those, 90% had purchased at least once some disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) during the first year. Hydroxychloroquine was the most common (76%), followed by azathioprine (15%) and methotrexate (13%). With the exception of increase in mycophenolate mofetil, the proportions remained stable over the whole study period 2000-2007. Drugs for cardiovascular diseases, dyslipidemia, diabetes mellitus, hypothyroidism and obstructive pulmonary disease were more frequently purchased than in the sex- and age-adjusted population, with rate ratios ranging from 1.6 to 7.8. Over the years 2000-2007, almost all the patients with incident SLE in Finland started with a DMARD. Higher percentages of SLE patients were on medication for several common chronic diseases than in the population as a whole.
  • Matikainen, Niina; Burza, Maria Antonella; Romeo, Stefano; Hakkarainen, Antti; Adiels, Martin; Folkersen, Lasse; Eriksson, Per; Lundbom, Nina; Ehrenborg, Ewa; Orho-Melander, Marju; Taskinen, Marja-Riitta; Boren, Jan (2013)
  • Gungor, Burcin; Vanharanta, Lauri; Hölttä-Vuori, Maarit; Pirhonen, Juho; Petersen, Nikolaj H. T.; Gramolelli, Silvia; Ojala, Päivi M.; Kirkegaard, Thomas; Ikonen, Elina (2019)
    Objective: Heat Shock Proteins (HSPs) maintain cellular homeostasis under stress. HSP70 represents a major stress-inducible family member and has been identified as a druggable target in inherited cholesterol-sphingolipid storage diseases. We investigated if HSP70 modulates cholesterol accumulation in more common conditions related to atherogenesis. Methods: We studied the effects of recombinant HSP70 in cholesterol-laden primary macrophages from human blood donors and pharmacological HSP70 upregulation in high-cholesterol diet fed zebrafish. Results: Recombinant HSP70 facilitated cholesterol removal from primary human macrophage foam cells. RNA sequencing revealed that HSP70 induced a robust transcriptional re-programming, including upregulation of key targets of liver X receptors (LXR), master regulators of whole-body cholesterol removal. Mechanistically, HSP70 interacted with the macrophage LXRalpha promoter, increased LXRalpha and its target mRNAs, and led to elevated levels of key proteins facilitating cholesterol efflux, including ATP-binding cassette transporters A1 and G1. Pharmacological augmentation of endogenous HSP70 in high-cholesterol diet fed zebrafish activated LXR and its target mRNAs and reduced cholesterol storage at the whole organism level. Conclusion: These data demonstrate that HSP70 exerts a cholesterol lowering effect in primary human cells and animals and uncover a nuclear action of HSP70 in mediating cross-talk between HSP and LXR transcriptional regulation. (C) 2019 The Authors. Published by Elsevier GmbH.
  • Kyrklund, Mikael; Bildo, Mika; Akhi, Ramin; Nissinen, Antti E.; Pussinen, Pirkko; Hörkkö, Sohvi; Wang, Chunguang (2020)
    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease and major cause of mortality worldwide. One of the crucial steps for atherosclerotic plaque development is oxidation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL). Through the oxidation, highly immunogenic epitopes are created and the immune system is activated. Association between atherosclerosis and periodontal diseases is well documented, and one of the main oral pathogens common in periodontitis is Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa). Heat shock protein 60 (HSP60) is an important virulence factor for Aa bacteria and a strong activator of the immune system. Cross-reactivity of HSP60 and oxidized LDL (OxLDL) antibodies could be a potential mechanism in the progression of atherosclerosis and one possible link between atherosclerosis and periodontitis. Human plasma samples from neonates and mothers were analyzed to determine if antibody titer to Aa-HSP60 protein is already present in newborns. Further objectives were to characterize antibody response in Aa-HSP60 immunized mice and to determine possible antibody cross-reaction with oxidized LDL. We demonstrated that newborns already have IgM antibody levels to Aa-HSP60. We also showed that in mice, Aa-HSP60 immunization provoked IgG and IgM antibody response not only to Aa-HSP60 but also to malondialdehyde acetaldehyde-modified LDL (MAA-LDL). Competition assay revealed that the antibodies were specific to Aa-HSP60 and cross-reacted with MAA-LDL. Our results suggest a possibility of molecular mimicry between Aa-HSP60 and MAA-LDL, making it intriguing to speculate on the role of HSP60 protein in atherosclerosis that manifests at young age.
  • Vorkapic, Emina; Dugic, Elma; Vikingsson, Svante; Roy, Joy; Mäyränpää, Mikko; Eriksson, Per; Wagsater, Dick (2016)
    Background: Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is characterized by vascular remodeling with increased infiltration of inflammatory cells and apoptosis/modulation of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs). Imatinib is a selective inhibitor of several tyrosine kinases, including PDGF receptors, Abl, and c-kit. The objective of this study was to characterize the potential protective role of imatinib on AAA development and the molecular mechanisms involved. Methods: Male ApoE(-/)-mice were infused with angiotensin (Ang) II (1000 ng/kg/min) for 4 weeks to induce AAA or saline as controls. Daily treatment with 10 mg/kg imatinib, or tap water as control, was provided via gavage for 4 weeks. Results: Treatment with imatinib was found to decrease the aortic diameter and vessel wall thickness, mediated by multiple effects. Imatinib treatment in AngII infused mice resulted in a reduced cellular infiltration of CD3 epsilon positive T lymphocytes by 86% and reduced gene expression of mast cell chymase by 50% compared with AngII infused mice lacking imatinib. Gene expression analysis of SMC marker SM22a demonstrated an increase by 48% together with a more intact medial layer after treatment with imatinib as evaluated with SM22 alpha immunostaining. Conclusion: Present findings highlight the importance of tyrosine kinase pathways in the development of AAA. Our results show, that imatinib treatment inhibits essential mast cell, T lymphocyte and SMC mediated processes in experimental AAA. Thus, our results support the idea that tyrosine kinase inhibitors may be useful in the treatment of pathological vascular inflammation and remodeling in conditions like AAA. (C) 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NCND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).
  • Strandberg, Timo E.; Räikkönen, K.; Salomaa, V.; Strandberg, A.; Kautiainen, H.; Kivimäki, M.; Pitkälä, K.; Huttunen, J. (2018)
    Objectives: In a 5-year multifactorial risk reduction intervention for healthy men with at least one cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factor, mortality was unexpectedly higher in the intervention than the control group during the first 15-year follow-up. In order to find explanations for the adverse outcome, we have extended mortality follow-up and examined in greater detail baseline characteristics that contributed to total mortality. Design: Long-term follow-up of a controlled intervention trial. Setting: The Helsinki Businessmen Study Intervention Trial. Participants and Intervention: The prevention trial between 1974-1980 included 1,222 initially healthy men (born 1919-1934) at high CVD risk, who were randomly allocated into intervention (n=612) and control groups (n=610). The 5-year multifactorial intervention consisted of personal health education and contemporary drug treatments for dyslipidemia and hypertension. In the present analysis we used previously unpublished data on baseline risk factors and lifestyle characteristics. Main outcome measures: 40-year total and cause-specific mortality through linkage to nation-wide death registers. Results: The study groups were practically identical at baseline in 1974, and the 5-year intervention significantly improved risk factors (body mass index, blood pressure, serum lipids and glucose), and total CVD risk by 46% in the intervention group. Despite this, total mortality has been consistently higher up to 25 years post-trial in the intervention group than the control group, and converging thereafter. Increased mortality risk was driven by CVD and accidental deaths. Of the newly-analysed baseline factors, there was a significant interaction for mortality between intervention group and yearly vacation time (P=0.027): shorter vacation was associated with excess 30-year mortality in the intervention (hazard ratio 1.37, 95% CI 1.03-1.83, P=0.03), but not in the control group (P=0.5). This finding was robust to multivariable adjustments. Conclusion: After a multifactorial intervention for healthy men with at least one CVD risk factor, there has been an unexpectedly increased mortality in the intervention group. This increase was especially observed in a subgroup characterised by shorter vacation time at baseline. Although this adverse response to personal preventive measures in vulnerable individuals may be characteristic to men of high social status with subclinical CVD, it clearly deserves further investigation.
  • Minniti, Mirko E.; Pedrelli, Matteo; Vedin, Lise-Lotte; Delbes, Anne-Sophie; Denis, Raphael G. P.; Öörni, Katariina; Sala, Claudia; Pirazzini, Chiara; Thiagarajan, Divya; Nurmi, Harri J.; Grompe, Markus; Mills, Kevin; Garagnani, Paolo; Ellis, Ewa C. S.; Strom, Stephen C.; Luquet, Serge H.; Wilson, Elizabeth M.; Bial, John; Steffensen, Knut R.; Parini, Paolo (2020)
    Background and Aims Genetically modified mice have been used extensively to study human disease. However, the data gained are not always translatable to humans because of major species differences. Liver-humanized mice (LHM) are considered a promising model to study human hepatic and systemic metabolism. Therefore, we aimed to further explore their lipoprotein metabolism and to characterize key hepatic species-related, physiological differences. Approach and Results Fah(-/-), Rag2(-/-), and Il2rg(-/-) knockout mice on the nonobese diabetic (FRGN) background were repopulated with primary human hepatocytes from different donors. Cholesterol lipoprotein profiles of LHM showed a human-like pattern, characterized by a high ratio of low-density lipoprotein to high-density lipoprotein, and dependency on the human donor. This pattern was determined by a higher level of apolipoprotein B100 in circulation, as a result of lower hepatic mRNA editing and low-density lipoprotein receptor expression, and higher levels of circulating proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9. As a consequence, LHM lipoproteins bind to human aortic proteoglycans in a pattern similar to human lipoproteins. Unexpectedly, cholesteryl ester transfer protein was not required to determine the human-like cholesterol lipoprotein profile. Moreover, LHM treated with GW3965 mimicked the negative lipid outcomes of the first human trial of liver X receptor stimulation (i.e., a dramatic increase of cholesterol and triglycerides in circulation). Innovatively, LHM allowed the characterization of these effects at a molecular level. Conclusions LHM represent an interesting translatable model of human hepatic and lipoprotein metabolism. Because several metabolic parameters displayed donor dependency, LHM may also be used in studies for personalized medicine.
  • Ruuth, Maija; Janssen, Laura G. M.; Aikas, Lauri; Tigistu-Sahle, Feven; Nahon, Kimberly J.; Ritvos, Olli; Ruhanen, Hanna; Käkelä, Reijo; Boon, Marlette R.; Öörni, Katariina; Rensen, Patrick C. N. (2019)
    BACKGROUND: South Asians are more prone to develop atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) compared with white Caucasians, which is not fully explained by classical risk factors. We recently reported that the presence of aggregation-prone low-density lipoprotein (LDL) in the circulation is associated with increased ASCVD mortality. OBJECTIVE: We hypothesized that LDL of South Asians is more prone to aggregate, which may be explained by differences in their LDL lipid composition. METHODS: In this cross-sectional hypothesis-generating study, LDL was isolated from plasma of healthy South Asians (n = 12) and age- and BMI-matched white Caucasians (n = 12), and its aggregation susceptibility and lipid composition were analyzed. RESULTS: LDL from South Asians was markedly more prone to aggregate compared with white Caucasians. Among all measured lipids, sphingomyelin 24:0 and triacylglycerol 56:8 showed the highest positive correlation with LDL aggregation. In addition, LDL from South Asians was enriched in arachidonic acid containing phosphatidylcholine 38:4 and had less phosphatidylcholines and cholesteryl esters containing monounsaturated fatty acids. Interestingly, body fat percentage, which was higher in South Asians (+26%), positively correlated with LDL aggregation and highly positively correlated with triacylglycerol 56:8, sphingomyelin 24:0, and total sphingomyelin. CONCLUSIONS: LDL aggregation susceptibility is higher in healthy young South Asians compared with white Caucasians. This may be partly explained by the higher body fat percentage of South Asians, leading to sphingomyelin enrichment of LDL. We anticipate that the presence of sphingomyelin-rich, aggregation -prone LDL particles in young South Asians may increase LDL accumulation in the arterial wall and thereby contribute to their increased risk of developing ASCVD later in life. (C) 2019 National Lipid Association. Published by Elsevier Inc.