Browsing by Subject "ATMOSPHERIC SULFURIC-ACID"

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  • Huang, Xin; Zhou, Luxi; Ding, Aijun; Qi, Ximeng; Nie, Wei; Wang, Minghuai; Chi, Xuguang; Petäjä, Tuukka; Kerminen, Veli-Matti; Roldin, Pontus; Rusanen, Anton; Kulmala, Markku; Boy, Michael (2016)
    New particle formation (NPF) has been investigated intensively during the last 2 decades because of its influence on aerosol population and the possible contribution to cloud condensation nuclei. However, intensive measurements and modelling activities on this topic in urban metropolitan areas in China with frequent high-pollution episodes are still very limited. This study provides results from a comprehensive modelling study on the occurrence of NPF events in the western part of the Yangtze River Delta (YRD) region, China. The comprehensive modelling system, which combines the WRF-Chem (the Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with Chemistry) regional chemical transport model and the MALTE-BOX sectional box model (the model to predict new aerosol formation in the lower troposphere), was shown to be capable of simulating atmospheric nucleation and subsequent growth. Here we present a detailed discussion of three typical NPF days, during which the measured air masses were notably influenced by either anthropogenic activities, biogenic emissions, or mixed ocean and continental sources. Overall, simulated NPF events were generally in good agreement with the corresponding measurements, enabling us to get further insights into NPF processes in the YRD region. Based on the simulations, we conclude that biogenic organic compounds, particularly monoterpenes, play an essential role in the initial condensational growth of newly formed clusters through their low-volatility oxidation products. Although some uncertain-ties remain in this modelling system, this method provides a possibility to better understand particle formation and growth processes.
  • Sarnela, Nina; Jokinen, Tuija; Duplissy, Jonathan; Yan, Chao; Nieminen, Tuomo; Ehn, Mikael; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Heinritzi, Martin; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Tröstl, Jasmin; Simon, Mario; Kürten, Andreas; Leiminger, Markus; Lawler, Michael J.; Rissanen, Matti P.; Bianchi, Federico; Praplan, Arnaud P.; Hakala, Jani; Amorim, Antonio; Gonin, Marc; Hansel, Armin; Kirkby, Jasper; Dommen, Josef; Curtius, Joachim; Smith, James N.; Petäjä, Tuukka; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Kulmala, Markku; Donahue, Neil M.; Sipilä, Mikko (2018)
    Atmospheric oxidation is an important phenomenon which produces large quantities of low-volatility compounds such as sulfuric acid and oxidized organic compounds. Such species may be involved in the nucleation of particles and enhance their subsequent growth to reach the size of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). In this study, we investigate alpha-pinene, the most abundant monoterpene globally, and its oxidation products formed through ozonolysis in the Cosmic Leaving OUtdoor Droplets (CLOUD) chamber at CERN (the European Organization for Nuclear Research). By scavenging hydroxyl radicals (OH) with hydrogen (H-2), we were able to investigate the formation of highly oxygenated molecules (HOMs) purely driven by ozonolysis and study the oxidation of sulfur dioxide (SO2) driven by stabilized Criegee intermediates (sCIs). We measured the concentrations of HOM and sulfuric acid with a chemical ionization atmospheric-pressure interface time-of-flight (CI-APi-TOF) mass spectrometer and compared the measured concentrations with simulated concentrations calculated with a kinetic model. We found molar yields in the range of 3.5-6.5% for HOM formation and 22-32% for the formation of stabilized Criegee intermediates by fitting our model to the measured sulfuric acid concentrations. The simulated time evolution of the ozonolysis products was in good agreement with measured concentrations except that in some of the experiments sulfuric acid formation was faster than simulated. In those experiments the simulated and measured concentrations met when the concentration reached a plateau but the plateau was reached 20-50 min later in the simulations. The results shown here are consistent with the recently published yields for HOM formation from different laboratory experiments. Together with the sCI yields, these results help us to understand atmospheric oxidation processes better and make the reaction parameters more comprehensive for broader use.
  • Kulmala, Markku; Horrak, Urmas; Manninen, Hanna E.; Mirme, Sander; Noppel, Madis; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Junninen, Heikki; Vehkamäki, Hanna; Kerminen, Veli-Matti; Noe, Steffen M.; Tammet, Hannes (2016)
    Atmospheric air ions, clusters and aerosol particles participate in a variety of atmospheric processes and considerably affect e.g. global climate and human health. When measured, air ions as well as atmospheric clusters and particles have been observed to be present practically always and everywhere. In this overview, we present a brief summary of the main achievements and legacy of the series of workshops organized mainly by the University of Helsinki and the University of Tartu. The legacy covers the development and standardization of new instruments, such as ion spectrometers, mass spectrometers and aerosol particle counters, as well as work toward theoretical understanding of new-particle formation and evolution of atmospheric clusters. One important legacy is the establishment of the SMEAR-Estonia station at Jarvselja.