Browsing by Subject "AUTOIMMUNITY"

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  • Leeb, Tosso; Leuthard, Fabienne; Jagannathan, Vidhya; Kiener, Sarah; Letko, Anna; Roosje, Petra; Welle, Monika M.; Gailbreath, Katherine L.; Cannon, Andrea; Linek, Monika; Banovic, Frane; Olivry, Thierry; White, Stephen D.; Batcher, Kevin; Bannasch, Danika; Minor, Katie M.; Mickelson, James R.; Hytönen, Marjo K.; Lohi, Hannes; Mauldin, Elizabeth A.; Casal, Margret L. (2020)
    Cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE) in humans encompasses multiple subtypes that exhibit a wide array of skin lesions and, in some cases, are associated with the development of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We investigated dogs with exfoliative cutaneous lupus erythematosus (ECLE), a dog-specific form of chronic CLE that is inherited as a monogenic autosomal recessive trait. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) with 14 cases and 29 controls confirmed a previously published result that the causative variant maps to chromosome 18. Autozygosity mapping refined the ECLE locus to a 493 kb critical interval. Filtering of whole genome sequence data from two cases against 654 controls revealed a single private protein-changing variant in this critical interval, UNC93B1:c.1438C>A or p.Pro480Thr. The homozygous mutant genotype was exclusively observed in 23 ECLE affected German Shorthaired Pointers and an ECLE affected Vizsla, but absent from 845 controls. UNC93B1 is a transmembrane protein located in the endoplasmic reticulum and endolysosomes, which is required for correct trafficking of several Toll-like receptors (TLRs). The p.Pro480Thr variant is predicted to affect the C-terminal tail of the UNC93B1 that has recently been shown to restrict TLR7 mediated autoimmunity via an interaction with syndecan binding protein (SDCBP). The functional knowledge on UNC93B1 strongly suggests that p.Pro480Thr is causing ECLE in dogs. These dogs therefore represent an interesting spontaneous model for human lupus erythematosus. Our results warrant further investigations of whether genetic variants affecting the C-terminus of UNC93B1 might be involved in specific subsets of CLE or SLE cases in humans and other species.
  • Nohynek, Hanna; Jokinen, Jukka; Partinen, Markku; Vaarala, Outi; Kirjavainen, Turkka; Sundman, Jonas; Himanen, Sari-Leena; Hublin, Christer; Julkunen, Ilkka; Olsen, Paivi; Saarenpaa-Heikkila, Outi; Kilpi, Terhi (2012)
  • Fontana, Flavia; Albertini, Silvia; Correia, Alexandra; Kemell, Marianna Leena; Lindgren, Rici; Mäkilä, Ermei; Salonen, Jarno; Hirvonen, Jouni Tapio; Ferrari, Franca; Almeida Santos, Helder (2018)
    Biohybrid nanosystems are at the center of personalized medicine, affording prolonged circulation time and targeting to the disease site, and serving as antigenic sources of vaccines. The optimization and functionality parameters of these nanosystems vary depending on the properties of the core particles. In this work, the effects of the core particles’ surface charge and hydrophobicity are evaluated on the nanosystem coating with vesicles derived from plasma membrane. The measured parameters are the dimensions, surface charge, shape, and stability of the biohybrid nanosystems, both in buffer and in biologically relevant media (plasma and simulated synovial fluid). Moreover, the cytocompatibility properties of the developed nanosystems are evaluated in different cell lines mimicking the target cell populations and other districts of the body involved in the distribution and elimination of the nanoparticles. Finally, the immunological profile of the particles is investigated, highlighting the absence of immune activation promoted by the nanoplatforms.
  • Haller-Kikkatalo, Kadri; Alnek, Kristi; Metspalu, Andres; Mihailov, Evelin; Metskula, Kaja; Kisand, Kalle; Pisarev, Heti; Salumets, Andres; Uibo, Raivo (2017)
    The presence of autoantibodies usually precedes autoimmune disease, but is sometimes considered an incidental finding with no clinical relevance. The prevalence of immune-mediated diseases was studied in a group of individuals from the Estonian Genome Project (n = 51,862), and 6 clinically significant autoantibodies were detected in a subgroup of 994 (auto) immune-mediated disease-free individuals. The overall prevalence of individuals with immune-mediated diseases in the primary cohort was 30.1%. Similarly, 23.6% of the participants in the disease-free subgroup were seropositive for at least one autoantibody. Several phenotypic parameters were associated with autoantibodies. The results suggest that (i) immune-mediated diseases are diagnosed in nearly one-third of a random European population, (ii) 6 common autoantibodies are detectable in almost one-third of individuals without diagnosed autoimmune diseases, (iii) tissue non-specific autoantibodies, especially at high levels, may reflect preclinical disease in symptom-free individuals, and (iv) the incidental positivity of anti-TPO in men with positive familial anamnesis of maternal autoimmune disease deserves further medical attention. These results encourage physicians to evaluate autoantibodies in addition to treating a variety of patient health complaints to detect autoimmune-mediated disease early.
  • Ekman, Ilse; Vuorinen, Tytti; Knip, Mikael; Veijola, Riitta; Toppari, Jorma; Hyöty, Heikki; Kinnunen, Tuure; Ilonen, Jorma; Lempainen, Johanna (2019)
    Aims/Hypothesis Evidence of the role of cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes (T1D) has remained inconclusive. Our aim was to elucidate the possible role of CMV infection in the initiation of islet autoimmunity and in the progression to clinical T1D among children with human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-conferred T1D risk. Methods A total of 1402 children from the prospective Type 1 Diabetes Prediction and Prevention (DIPP) study were analyzed for CMV-specific IgG antibodies during early childhood. All the children carried HLA-DQ genotypes associated with increased risk for T1D. The effect of CMV infection on the appearance of T1D-associated autoantibodies (insulin autoantibodies [IAA], glutamic acid decarboxylase [GADA], and insulinoma antigen-2 [IA-2A], n = 356) and on the progression rate to clinical T1D (n = 233) were analyzed with Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and Log-rank test. Results Early childhood CMV infection was inversely associated with the development of T1D during childhood. Cumulative progression to T1D was decreased in subjects with an early CMV infection (P = 0.035). In further analyses, the effect of early CMV infection on the initiation of islet autoimmunity and progression to clinical T1D were examined separately. Interestingly, early CMV infection did not affect the appearance of T1D-associated autoantibodies but a decelerating effect was observed on the progression rate from islet autoimmunity to clinical T1D (P = 0.015). Conclusion Our results suggest that an early childhood CMV infection may decelerate the progression from islet autoimmunity to clinical T1D among at-risk children and may thus protect these children from progressing to T1D during childhood.
  • Diabimmune Study Grp; Simre, Kart; Uibo, Oivi; Hämäläinen, Anu-Maaria; Härkönen, Taina; Siljander, Heli; Virtanen, Suvi M.; Ilonen, Jorma; Hyöty, Heikki; Knip, Mikael (2019)
    Aim Our aim was to compare the presence of various common viruses (rhinovirus, enterovirus, adenovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, cytomegalovirus, norovirus, parechovirus) in stool and nasal swab samples as well as virus-specific antibodies in serum samples between children who developed coeliac disease and controls. Methods A case-control study was established based on the DIABIMMUNE Study cohorts. During the study, eight Estonian children and 21 Finnish children aged 1.5 years to five years developed coeliac disease and each was matched with a disease-free control. Nasal swabs and stool samples were taken at the age of three to six months and the serum samples at the time of diagnosis. Results Rhinovirus ribonucleic acid was detected in the nasal swabs from five coeliac disease children, but none of the control children (p = 0.05). There were no statistically significant differences in the level of viral antibodies between cases and controls. Enterovirus immunoglobulin G class antibodies were found more frequently in the Estonian than in the Finnish children (63% versus 23%, p = 0.02). Conclusion This study did not find any marked overall differences in laboratory-confirmed common viral infections between the children who developed coeliac disease and the controls. However, rhinovirus infections were detected slightly more often in those patients who developed coeliac disease.
  • Sane, Famara; Bertin, Antoine; Sioofy-Khojine, Amir-Babak; Oikarinen, Sami; Alidjinou, Enagnon K.; Veijola, Riitta; Toppari, Jorma; Ilonen, Jorma; Knip, Mikael; Engelmann, Ilka; Hyöty, Heikki; Hober, Didier (2020)
    Abstract Studies in prospective cohorts have suggested that enterovirus infections are associated with the appearance of islet autoantibodies that precede later appearance of type 1 diabetes (T1D). It was shown that in addition to an antibody-mediated anti-coxsackievirus (CV)-B neutralizing activity of serum from patients with T1D, there was also enhancing anti-CV-B activity in vitro. In this study the patterns of enhancing and neutralizing anti-CV activities were analyzed from consecutive serum samples collected from children who were followed from birth until they developed T1D in the Finnish Type 1 Diabetes Prediction and Prevention (DIPP) study and compared to those in non-diabetic control children. The titers of serum neutralizing activity were analyzed against those CVs which were detected in the stools in these children (CV-B3, CV-B5 or CV-A4) using plaque assay. The enhancing activity of these serum samples was analysed by measuring interferon-alpha (INF-α) production in cultures of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) inoculated with a mixture of these viruses and diluted serum. A sustained anti-CV enhancing activity was observed in consecutive serum samples in patients with T1D. The pattern of responses differed between children who developed T1D and control children. In patients, the anti-CV enhancing activity was predominant or even exclusive over the neutralizing activity, whereas in controls the enhancing and neutralizing activities were more balanced or the neutralizing activity was largely predominant. In conclusion, evaluating the anti-enterovirus neutralizing and enhancing activity of serum samples can be useful to investigate further the relationship between enteroviruses and the development of T1D. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
  • Lietzen, Niina; An, Le T. T.; Jaakkola, Maria K.; Kallionpää, Henna; Oikarinen, Sami; Mykkänen, Juha; Knip, Mikael; Veijola, Riitta; Ilonen, Jorma; Toppari, Jorma; Hyoty, Heikki; Lahesmaa, Riitta; Elo, Laura L. (2018)
    Aims/hypothesis Enterovirus infections have been associated with the development of type 1 diabetes in multiple studies, but little is known about enterovirus-induced responses in children at risk for developing type 1 diabetes. Our aim was to use genome-wide transcriptomics data to characterise enterovirus-associated changes in whole-blood samples from children with genetic susceptibility to type 1 diabetes. Methods Longitudinal whole-blood samples (356 samples in total) collected from 28 pairs of children at increased risk for developing type 1 diabetes were screened for the presence of enterovirus RNA. Seven of these samples were detected as enterovirus-positive, each of them collected from a different child, and transcriptomics data from these children were analysed to understand the individual-level responses associated with enterovirus infections. Transcript clusters with peaking or dropping expression at the time of enterovirus positivity were selected as the enterovirus-associated signals. Results Strong signs of activation of an interferon response were detected in four children at enterovirus positivity, while transcriptomic changes in the other three children indicated activation of adaptive immune responses. Additionally, a large proportion of the enterovirus-associated changes were specific to individuals. An enterovirus-induced signature was built using 339 genes peaking at enterovirus positivity in four of the children, and 77 of these genes were also upregulated in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells infected in vitro with different enteroviruses. These genes separated the four enterovirus-positive samples clearly from the remaining 352 blood samples analysed. Conclusions/interpretation We have, for the first time, identified enterovirus-associated transcriptomic profiles in whole-blood samples from children with genetic susceptibility to type 1 diabetes. Our results provide a starting point for understanding the individual responses to enterovirus infections in blood and their potential connection to the development of type 1 diabetes.
  • Hetemäki, Iivo; Jian, Ching; Laakso, Saila Marita; Mäkitie, Outi; Pajari, Anne-Maria; Vos de, Willem Meindert; Arstila, Petteri; Salonen, Anne (2021)
    Backgrounds and Aims: APECED is a rare autoimmune disease caused by mutations in the Autoimmune Regulator gene. A significant proportion of patients also have gastrointestinal symptoms, including malabsorption, chronic diarrhea, and obstipation. The pathological background of the gastrointestinal symptoms remains incompletely understood and involves multiple factors, with autoimmunity being the most common underlying cause. Patients with APECED have increased immune responses against gut commensals. Our objective was to evaluate whether the intestinal microbiota composition, predicted functions or fungal abundance differ between Finnish patients with APECED and healthy controls, and whether these associate to the patients’ clinical phenotype and gastrointestinal symptoms. Methods: DNA was isolated from fecal samples from 15 patients with APECED (median age 46.4 years) together with 15 samples from body mass index matched healthy controls. DNA samples were subjected to analysis of the gut microbiota using 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing, imputed metagenomics using the PICRUSt2 algorithm, and quantitative PCR for fungi. Extensive correlations of the microbiota with patient characteristics were determined. Results: Analysis of gut microbiota indicated that both alpha- and beta-diversity were altered in patients with APECED compared to healthy controls. The fraction of Faecalibacterium was reduced in patients with APECED while that of Atopobium spp. and several gram-negative genera previously implicated in biofilm formation, e.g. Veillonella, Prevotella, Megasphaera and Heamophilus, were increased in parallel to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) synthesis in imputed metagenomics. The differences in gut microbiota were linked to patient characteristics, especially the presence of anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae antibodies (ASCA) and severity of gastrointestinal symptoms. Conclusions: Gut microbiota of patients with APECED is altered and enriched with predominantly gram-negative bacterial taxa that may promote biofilm formation and lead to increased exposure to LPS in the patients. The most pronounced alterations in the microbiota were associated with more severe gastrointestinal symptoms.
  • Viitasalo, Liisa; Iltanen, Sari; Huhtala, Heini; Saavalainen, Päivi; Kaukinen, Katri; Lindfors, Katri; Kurppa, Kalle (2020)
    Risk of celiac disease (CD) is increased in relatives of CD patients due to genetic and possible environmental factors. We recently reported increased seropositivity to anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (ASCA), Pseudomonas fluorescens-associated sequence (anti-I2) and Bacteroides caccae TonB-linked outer membrane protein (anti-OmpW) antibodies in CD. We hypothesized these markers also to be overrepresented in relatives. Seropositivity and levels of ASCA, anti-I2 and anti-OmpW were compared between 463 first-degree relatives, 58 untreated and 55 treated CD patients, and 80 controls. CD-associated human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-haplotypes and transglutaminase (tTGab) and endomysium (EmA) antibodies were determined. One or more of the microbial antibodies was present in 75% of relatives, 97% of untreated and 87% of treated CD patients and 44% of the controls. The relatives had higher median ASCA IgA (9.13 vs. 4.50 U/mL, p <0.001), ASCA IgG (8.91 vs. 5.75 U/mL, p <0.001) and anti-I2 (absorbance 0.74 vs. 0.32, p <0.001) levels than controls. There was a weak, positive correlation between tTGab and ASCA (r = 0.31, p <0.001). Seropositivity was not significantly associated with HLA. To conclude, seropositivity to microbial markers was more common and ASCA and anti-I2 levels higher in relatives of CD patients than controls. These findings were not associated with HLA, suggesting the role of other genetic and environmental factors.
  • Gershony, Liza C.; Belanger, Janelle M.; Hytonen, Marjo K.; Lohi, Hannes; Famula, Thomas R.; Oberbauer, Anita M. (2020)
    Background Primary hypoadrenocorticism (or Addison's disease, AD) is an autoimmune disease that results in destruction of the adrenal cortex and consequent adrenal insufficiency. The disease has been described in purebred and mixed breed dogs, although some breeds, including the Bearded Collie, are at increased risk for AD. Candidate gene approaches have yielded few associations that appear to be breed-specific. A single other genome-wide association study reported no significant regions of association for AD in Standard Poodles. The present study aimed to identify genomic regions of association for canine AD in Bearded Collies. Results Our study consists of the first genome-wide association analysis to identify a genome-wide significant region of association with canine AD (CFA18). Peaks of suggestive association were also noted on chromosomes 11, 16 and 29. Logistic regression analysis supported an additive effect of risk genotypes at these smaller effect loci on the probability of disease associated with carrying a risk genotype on CFA18. Potential candidate genes involved in adrenal steroidogenesis, regulation of immune responses and/or inflammation were identified within the associated regions of chromosomes 11 and 16. The gene-poor regions of chromosomes 18 and 29 may, however, harbor regulatory sequences that can modulate gene expression and contribute to disease susceptibility. Conclusion Our findings support the polygenic and complex nature of canine AD and identified a strongly associated locus on CFA18 that, when combined with three other smaller effect loci, was predictive of disease. The results offer progress in the identification of susceptibility loci for canine AD in the Bearded Collie. Further studies are needed to confirm association with the suggested candidate genes and identify actual causative mutations involved with AD susceptibility in this breed.
  • GC-HBOC Study Collaborators; GEMO Study Collaborators; EMBRACE Collaborators; HEBON Investigators; BCFR Investigators; ABCTB Investigators; Ferreira, Manuel A.; Gamazon, Eric R.; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Kiiski, Johanna I.; Nevanlinna, Heli (2019)
    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified more than 170 breast cancer susceptibility loci. Here we hypothesize that some risk-associated variants might act in non-breast tissues, specifically adipose tissue and immune cells from blood and spleen. Using expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) reported in these tissues, we identify 26 previously unreported, likely target genes of overall breast cancer risk variants, and 17 for estrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer, several with a known immune function. We determine the directional effect of gene expression on disease risk measured based on single and multiple eQTL. In addition, using a gene-based test of association that considers eQTL from multiple tissues, we identify seven (and four) regions with variants associated with overall (and ER-negative) breast cancer risk, which were not reported in previous GWAS. Further investigation of the function of the implicated genes in breast and immune cells may provide insights into the etiology of breast cancer.
  • Vatanen, Tommi; Plichta, Damian R.; Somani, Juhi; Muench, Philipp C.; Arthur, Timothy D.; Hall, Andrew Brantley; Rudolf, Sabine; Oakeley, Edward J.; Ke, Xiaobo; Young, Rachel A.; Haiser, Henry J.; Kolde, Raivo; Yassour, Moran; Luopajärvi, Kristiina; Siljander, Heli; Virtanen, Suvi M.; Ilonen, Jorma; Uibo, Raivo; Tillmann, Vallo; Mokurov, Sergei; Dorshakova, Natalya; Porter, Jeffrey A.; McHardy, Alice C.; Lahdesmaki, Harri; Vlamakis, Hera; Huttenhower, Curtis; Knip, Mikael; Xavier, Ramnik J. (2019)
    The human gut microbiome matures towards the adult composition during the first years of life and is implicated in early immune development. Here, we investigate the effects of microbial genomic diversity on gut microbiome development using integrated early childhood data sets collected in the DIABIMMUNE study in Finland, Estonia and Russian Karelia. We show that gut microbial diversity is associated with household location and linear growth of children. Single nucleotide polymorphism- and metagenomic assembly-based strain tracking revealed large and highly dynamic microbial pangenomes, especially in the genus Bacteroides, in which we identified evidence of variability deriving from Bacteroides-targeting bacteriophages. Our analyses revealed functional consequences of strain diversity; only 10% of Finnish infants harboured Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis, a subspecies specialized in human milk metabolism, whereas Russian infants commonly maintained a probiotic Bifidobacterium bifidum strain in infancy. Groups of bacteria contributing to diverse, characterized metabolic pathways converged to highly subject-specific configurations over the first two years of life. This longitudinal study extends the current view of early gut microbial community assembly based on strain-level genomic variation.
  • Mina, Michael J.; Kula, Tomasz; Leng, Yumei; Li, Mamie; de Vries, Rory D.; Knip, Mikael; Siljander, Heli; Rewers, Marian; Choy, David F.; Wilson, Mark S.; Larman, H. Benjamin; Nelson, Ashley N.; Griffin, Diane E.; de Swart, Rik L.; Elledge, Stephen J. (2019)
    Measles virus is directly responsible for more than 100,000 deaths yearly. Epidemiological studies have associated measles with increased morbidity and mortality for years after infection, but the reasons why are poorly understood. Measles virus infects immune cells, causing acute immune suppression. To identify and quantify long-term effects of measles on the immune system, we used VirScan, an assay that tracks antibodies to thousands of pathogen epitopes in blood. We studied 77 unvaccinated children before and 2 months after natural measles virus infection. Measles caused elimination of 11 to 73% of the antibody repertoire across individuals. Recovery of antibodies was detected after natural reexposure to pathogens. Notably, these immune system effects were not observed in infants vaccinated against MMR (measles, mumps, and rubella), but were confirmed in measles-infected macaques. The reduction in humoral immune memory after measles infection generates potential vulnerability to future infections, underscoring the need for widespread vaccination.
  • Sen, Partho; Dickens, Alex M.; Lopez-Bascon, Maria Asuncion; Lindeman, Tuomas; Kemppainen, Esko; Lamichhane, Santosh; Rönkkö, Tuukka; Ilonen, Jorma; Toppari, Jorma; Veijola, Riitta; Hyöty, Heikki; Hyötyläinen, Tuulia; Knip, Mikael; Oresic, Matej (2020)
    Aims/hypothesis Previous metabolomics studies suggest that type 1 diabetes is preceded by specific metabolic disturbances. The aim of this study was to investigate whether distinct metabolic patterns occur in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of children who later develop pancreatic beta cell autoimmunity or overt type 1 diabetes. Methods In a longitudinal cohort setting, PBMC metabolomic analysis was applied in children who (1) progressed to type 1 diabetes (PT1D, n = 34), (2) seroconverted to >= 1 islet autoantibody without progressing to type 1 diabetes (P1Ab, n = 27) or (3) remained autoantibody negative during follow-up (CTRL, n = 10). Results During the first year of life, levels of most lipids and polar metabolites were lower in the PT1D and P1Ab groups compared with the CTRL group. Pathway over-representation analysis suggested alanine, aspartate, glutamate, glycerophospholipid and sphingolipid metabolism were over-represented in PT1D. Genome-scale metabolic models of PBMCs during type 1 diabetes progression were developed by using publicly available transcriptomics data and constrained with metabolomics data from our study. Metabolic modelling confirmed altered ceramide pathways, known to play an important role in immune regulation, as specifically associated with type 1 diabetes progression. Conclusions/interpretation Our data suggest that systemic dysregulation of lipid metabolism, as observed in plasma, may impact the metabolism and function of immune cells during progression to overt type 1 diabetes. Data availability The GEMs for PBMCs have been submitted to BioModels (), under accession number MODEL1905270001. The metabolomics datasets and the clinical metadata generated in this study were submitted to MetaboLights (), under accession number MTBLS1015.
  • Sharapova, Svetlana O.; Haapaniemi, Emma; Sakovich, Inga S.; Rojas, Jessica; Gamez-Diaz, Laura; Mareika, Yuliya E.; Guryanova, Irina E.; Migas, Alexandr A.; Mikhaleuskaya, Taisiya M.; Grimbacher, Bodo; Aleinikova, Olga V. (2018)
  • Hertel, Christina; Fishman, Dmytro; Lorenc, Anna; Ranki, Annamari; Krohn, Kai; Peterson, Pärt; Kisand, Kai; Hayday, Adrian (2019)
    In 2016, we reported four substantial observations of APECED/APS1 patients, who are deficient in AIRE, a major regulator of central T cell tolerance (Meyer et al., 2016). Two of those observations have been challenged. Specifically, 'private' autoantibody reactivities shared by only a few patients but collectively targeting >1000 autoantigens have been attributed to false positives (Landegren, 2019). While acknowledging this risk, our study-design included follow-up validation, permitting us to adopt statistical approaches to also limit false negatives. Importantly, many such private specificities have now been validated by multiple, independent means including the autoantibodies ' molecular cloning and expression. Second, a significant correlation of antibody-mediated IFN a neutralization with an absence of disease in patients highly disposed to Type I diabetes has been challenged because of a claimed failure to replicate our findings (Landegren, 2019). However, flaws in design and implementation invalidate this challenge. Thus, our results present robust, insightful, independently validated depictions of APECED/APS1, that have spawned productive follow-up studies.
  • Mäkinen, Marjaana; Löyttyniemi, Eliisa; Koskinen, Maarit; Vähä-Mäkilä, Mari; Siljander, Heli; Nurmio, Mirja; Mykkänen, Juha; Virtanen, Suvi M.; Simell, Olli; Hyöty, Heikki; Ilonen, Jorma; Knip, Mikael; Veijola, Riitta; Toppari, Jorma (2019)
    Vitamin D has several effects on the immune system that might be of relevance for the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes (T1D).To evaluate whether umbilical cord serum concentrations of 25-hydroxy-vitamin D (25[OH]D) differ in children developing either islet autoimmunity (IA) or overt T1D during childhood and adolescence.Umbilical cord serum samples from 764 children born from 1994 to 2004 with HLA-DQB1 conferred risk for T1D participating in the Type 1 Diabetes Prediction and Prevention Study were analyzed for 25(OH)D using an enzyme immunoassay.DIPP clinics in Turku, Oulu, and Tampere University Hospitals, Finland.Two hundred fifty children who developed T1D diabetes at a median age of 6.7 years (interquartile range [IQR] 4.0 to 10.1 years) and 132 additional case children who developed IA, i.e., positivity for multiple islet autoantibodies. Cases were matched for date of birth, gender, and area of birth with 382 control children who remained autoantibody negative. The median duration of follow up was 9.8 years (IQR 5.7 to 13.1 years).The median 25(OH)D concentrations.The median 25(OH)D concentration in cord serum was low [31.1 nmol/L (IQR 24.0 to 41.8); 88% <50 nmol/L], but not statistically different between children who developed T1D or IA and their control groups (P = 0.70). The levels were associated mainly with geographical location, year and month of birth, age of the mother, and maternal intake of vitamin D during pregnancy.The 25(OH)D concentrations at birth are not associated with the development of T1D during childhood.