Browsing by Subject "Access"

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  • Bosqui, Tania; O'Reilly, Dermot; Vaananen, Ari; Patel, Kishan; Donnelly, Michael; Wright, David; Close, Ciara; Kouvonen, Anne (2019)
    PurposeThere is a recent and growing migrant population in Northern Ireland. However, rigorous research is absent regarding access to mental health care by different migrant groups. In order to address this knowledge gap, this study aimed to identify the relative use of psychotropic medication between the largest first generation migrant groups in Northern Ireland and the majority population.MethodsCensus (2011) data was linked to psychotropic prescriptions for the entire enumerated population of Northern Ireland using data linkage methodology through the Administrative Data Research Centre Northern Ireland (ADRC-NI).ResultsLower prescription dispensation for all psychotropic medication types, particularly antidepressants (OR=0.35, CI 95% 0.33-0.36) and anxiolytics (OR=0.42, CI 95% 0.40-0.44), was observed for all migrant groups with the exception of migrants from Germany.ConclusionsIt is likely that the results reflect poorer access to services and indicate a need to improve access and the match between resources, services and the health and social care needs of migrants. Further research is required to identify barriers to accessing primary care and mental health services.
  • Bosqui, Tania; O’Reilly, Dermot; Väänänen, Ari; Patel, Kishan; Donnelly, Michael; Wright, David; Close, Ciara; Kouvonen, Anne (BioMed Central, 2019)
    Abstract Purpose There is a recent and growing migrant population in Northern Ireland. However, rigorous research is absent regarding access to mental health care by different migrant groups. In order to address this knowledge gap, this study aimed to identify the relative use of psychotropic medication between the largest first generation migrant groups in Northern Ireland and the majority population. Methods Census (2011) data was linked to psychotropic prescriptions for the entire enumerated population of Northern Ireland using data linkage methodology through the Administrative Data Research Centre Northern Ireland (ADRC-NI). Results Lower prescription dispensation for all psychotropic medication types, particularly antidepressants (OR = 0.35, CI 95% 0.33–0.36) and anxiolytics (OR = 0.42, CI 95% 0.40–0.44), was observed for all migrant groups with the exception of migrants from Germany. Conclusions It is likely that the results reflect poorer access to services and indicate a need to improve access and the match between resources, services and the health and social care needs of migrants. Further research is required to identify barriers to accessing primary care and mental health services.
  • Markkula, Niina; Cabieses, Baltica; Lehti, Venla; Uphoff, Eleonora; Astorga, Sofia; Stutzin, Francisca (BioMed Central, 2018)
    Abstract Background Migrant children have specific health needs, and may face difficulties in accessing health care, but not enough is known about their health service use. This study aims to describe patterns of use of health services of international migrant children and differences to respective native populations. Methods Electronic databases PubMed and Web of Science, references of identified publications, and websites of relevant international agencies were searched. We included observational studies published between 2006 and 2016 that reported use of formal health services by migrant children (0–18 years), including first and second generation migrants. Data on study characteristics, study theme, main outcome and study quality were extracted. Results One hundred seven full texts were included in the review. Of the studies that reported comparable outcomes, half (50%) indicated less use of healthcare by migrants compared with non-migrants; 25% reported no difference, 18% reported greater use, and 7% did not report this outcome. There was variation by theme, so that the proportion of conclusions “less use” was most common in the categories “general access to care”, “primary care” and “oral health”, whereas in the use of emergency rooms or hospitalisations, the most common conclusion was “greater use”. Conclusions Migrant children appear to use different types of healthcare services less than native populations, with the exception of emergency and hospital services. Systematic review registration PROSPERO systematic review registration number: CRD42016039876 .