Browsing by Subject "Acute subdural hematoma"

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  • Raj, Rahul; Mikkonen, Era D.; Kivisaari, Riku; Skrifvars, Markus B.; Korja, Miikka; Siironen, Jari (2016)
    BACKGROUND: Surgery for elderly patients with acute subdural hematomas (ASDH) is controversial, because postoperative mortality rates are reported to be high and long-term outcomes unknown. Thus, we aimed to describe midterm and long-term mortality rates of elderly patients operated for an ASDH. METHODS: We reviewed all consecutive >= 75-year-old patients operated on for an ASDH between 2009 and 2012. We recorded data on preadmission functional status (independent or dependent) and use of antithrombotic medication. Patients were followed up a median of 4.2 years (range, 2.5-6.4 years). RESULTS: Forty-four patients were included. The majority of the patients (70%) were independent and taking antithrombotic medication (77%). Independent patients had a 1-year mortality of 42%, compared to 69% for dependent patients; 56% of patients taking antithrombotics and 30% of those without antithrombotics died within the first postoperative year. All patients with an admission Glasgow coma scale score of 3-8 died within the first postoperative year, if they used antithrombotics or were dependent before the injury. Of all 1-year survivors, 77% were alive at the end of follow-up. CONCLUSION: In this first surgical case series of 75-year-old or older patients with ASDH, the overall mortality rate appears to be relatively low, especially for preoperatively conscious and independent patients without antithrombotic medication. Patients alive at 1-year after surgery had a life expectancy comparable to their age-matched peers. The prognosis seems to be detrimental for preoperatively unconscious patients who were functionally dependent or used antithrombotic medication before the injury.
  • van Essen, Thomas A.; den Boogert, Hugo F.; Cnossen, Maryse C.; CENTER-TBI Investigators Partici; Kaukonen, Maija; Kivisaari, Riku; Piippo-Karjalainen, Anna; Raj, Rahul; Tanskanen, Päivi; Palotie, Aarno; Pirinen, Matti; Ripatti, Samuli (2019)
    BackgroundNeurosurgical management of traumatic brain injury (TBI) is challenging, with only low-quality evidence. We aimed to explore differences in neurosurgical strategies for TBI across Europe.MethodsA survey was sent to 68 centers participating in the Collaborative European Neurotrauma Effectiveness Research in Traumatic Brain Injury (CENTER-TBI) study. The questionnaire contained 21 questions, including the decision when to operate (or not) on traumatic acute subdural hematoma (ASDH) and intracerebral hematoma (ICH), and when to perform a decompressive craniectomy (DC) in raised intracranial pressure (ICP).ResultsThe survey was completed by 68 centers (100%). On average, 10 neurosurgeons work in each trauma center. In all centers, a neurosurgeon was available within 30min. Forty percent of responders reported a thickness or volume threshold for evacuation of an ASDH. Most responders (78%) decide on a primary DC in evacuating an ASDH during the operation, when swelling is present. For ICH, 3% would perform an evacuation directly to prevent secondary deterioration and 66% only in case of clinical deterioration. Most respondents (91%) reported to consider a DC for refractory high ICP. The reported cut-off ICP for DC in refractory high ICP, however, differed: 60% uses 25mmHg, 18% 30mmHg, and 17% 20mmHg. Treatment strategies varied substantially between regions, specifically for the threshold for ASDH surgery and DC for refractory raised ICP. Also within center variation was present: 31% reported variation within the hospital for inserting an ICP monitor and 43% for evacuating mass lesions.ConclusionDespite a homogeneous organization, considerable practice variation exists of neurosurgical strategies for TBI in Europe. These results provide an incentive for comparative effectiveness research to determine elements of effective neurosurgical care.