Browsing by Subject "Aquaculture"

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  • Macqueen, Daniel J; Primmer, Craig R; Houston, Ross D; Nowak, Barbara F; Bernatchez, Louis; Bergseth, Steinar; Davidson, William S; Gallardo-Escárate, Cristian; Goldammer, Tom; Guiguen, Yann; Iturra, Patricia; Kijas, James W; Koop, Ben F; Lien, Sigbjørn; Maass, Alejandro; Martin, Samuel A; McGinnity, Philip; Montecino, Martin; Naish, Kerry A; Nichols, Krista M; Ólafsson, Kristinn; Omholt, Stig W; Palti, Yniv; Plastow, Graham S; Rexroad, Caird E; Rise, Matthew L; Ritchie, Rachael J; Sandve, Simen R; Schulte, Patricia M; Tello, Alfredo; Vidal, Rodrigo; Vik, Jon O; Wargelius, Anna; Yáñez, José M (BioMed Central, 2017)
    Abstract We describe an emerging initiative - the ‘Functional Annotation of All Salmonid Genomes’ (FAASG), which will leverage the extensive trait diversity that has evolved since a whole genome duplication event in the salmonid ancestor, to develop an integrative understanding of the functional genomic basis of phenotypic variation. The outcomes of FAASG will have diverse applications, ranging from improved understanding of genome evolution, to improving the efficiency and sustainability of aquaculture production, supporting the future of fundamental and applied research in an iconic fish lineage of major societal importance.
  • Antuofermo, Elisabetta; Pais, Antonio; Nuvoli, Sara; Hetzel, Udo; Burrai, Giovanni P.; Rocca, Stefano; Caffara, Monica; Giorgi, Ilaria; Pedron, Claudio; Prearo, Marino (2014)
  • Suzuki, Satoru; Nakanishi, Sayoko; Tamminen, Manu; Yokokawa, Taichi; Sato-Takabe, Yuki; Ohta, Kohei; Chou, Hsin-Yiu; Muziasari, Windi I.; Virta, Marko (2019)
    The use of antibiotics in aquaculture causes selection pressure for antibiotic-resistant bacteria (ARB). Antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) may persist in ARB and the environment for long time even after stopping drug administration. Here we show monthly differences in the occurrences of genes conferring resistance to sulfonamides (i.e. sul1, sul2, sul3), and tetracyclines (tet(M)) in Japanese aquaculture seawater accompanied by records of drug administration. sul2 was found to persist throughout the year, whereas the occurrences of sul1, sul3, and tet(M) changed month-to-month. sul3 and tet(M) were detected in natural bacterial assemblages in May and July, but not in colony-forming bacteria, thus suggesting that the sul3 was harbored by the non-culturable fraction of the bacterial community. Comparison of results from Taiwanese, Japanese, and Finnish aquaculture waters reveals that the profile of sul genes and tet(M) in Taiwan resembles that in Japan, but is distinct from that in Finland. To our knowledge, this work represents the first report to use the same method to compare the dynamics of sul genes and tet(M) in aquaculture seawater in different countries. (C) 2019 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
  • Soininen, Niko; Belinskij, Antti; Similä, Jukka; Kortet, Raine (2019)
    This article analyses the legal adaptive capacity for increasing sustainable fish aquaculture production in EU-Finland. Currently, fish aquaculture is driven by increasing global demand of fish, declining natural fisheries, food security and blue growth policies. At the same time, environmental policies such as the EU Water Framework Directive and the Marine Strategy Framework Directive set tightening legal-ecological requirements for the industry's nutrient emissions. Against this background, the success of blue growth policies related to aquaculture – and the hope of reconciling competing interests at sea – boil down to measures available for dealing with excess nutrients. In line with the mitigation hierarchy, the article establishes four alternative pathways for the fish aquaculture industry to grow without increasing its environmental nutrient footprint significantly, and evaluates the legal adaptive capacity and the legal risks attached to these pathways.
  • Vennerström, P.; Välimäki, E.; Lyytikäinen, T.; Hautaniemi, M.; Vidgren, G.; Koski, P. (2017)
    The eradication of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV Id) from Finnish brackish-water rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss farms located in the restriction zone in the Province of Åland, Baltic Sea, failed several times in the 2000s. The official surveillance programme was often unable to find VHSV-positive populations, leading to the misbelief in the fish farming industry that virus eradication could be achieved. The ability of 3 other surveillance programmes to detect infected fish populations was compared with the official programme. One programme involved syndromic surveillance based on the observation of clinical disease signs by fish farmers, while 2 programmes comprised active surveillance similar to the official programme, but included increased sampling frequencies and 2 additional tests. The syndromic surveillance concentrated on sending in samples for analysis when any sign of a possible infectious disease at water temperatures below 15°C was noticed. This programme clearly outperformed active surveillance. A realtime reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction method proved to be at least as sensitive as virus isolation in cell culture in detecting acute VHSV infections. An ELISA method was used to test fish serum for antibodies against VHSV. The ELISA method may be a useful tool in VHSV eradication for screening populations during the follow-up period, before declaring an area free of infection.
  • Vennerström, Pia; Välimäki, Elina; Lyytikäinen, Tapani; Hautaniemi, Maria; Vidgren, Gabriele; Koski, Perttu; Virtala, Anna-Maija (2017)
    The eradication of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV Id) from Finnish brackish-water rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss farms located in the restriction zone in the Province of angstrom land, Baltic Sea, failed several times in the 2000s. The official surveillance programme was often unable to find VHSV-positive populations, leading to the misbelief in the fish farming industry that virus eradication could be achieved. The ability of 3 other surveillance programmes to detect infected fish populations was compared with the official programme. One programme involved syndromic surveillance based on the observation of clinical disease signs by fish farmers, while 2 programmes comprised active surveillance similar to the official programme, but included increased sampling frequencies and 2 additional tests. The syndromic surveillance concentrated on sending in samples for analysis when any sign of a possible infectious disease at water temperatures below 15 degrees C was noticed. This programme clearly outperformed active surveillance. A real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction method proved to be at least as sensitive as virus isolation in cell culture in detecting acute VHSV infections. An ELISA method was used to test fish serum for antibodies against VHSV. The ELISA method may be a useful tool in VHSV eradication for screening populations during the follow-up period, before declaring an area free of infection.
  • Vennerström, Pia; Välimäki, Elina; Hautaniemi, Maria; Lyytikainen, Tapani; Kapiainen, Suvi; Vidgren, Gabriele; Virtala, Anna-Maija (2018)
    Wild fish were suspected to be the source of reinfection by viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) in Finnish brackish water rainbow trout farms located in a restriction zone regarding viral haemorrhagic septicaemia (VHS) comprising the entire Province of Aland, Baltic Sea, in the 2000s. Altogether, 1636 wild fish of 17 different species living in the vicinity of infected fish farms were screened for VHSV during the years 2005-2008. Additionally, 2 uninfected wild fish species as well as farmed whitefish were introduced into a VHS-positive fish farm to test whether they became infected by VHSV from the clinically diseased rainbow trout. Wild fish did not test positive for VHSV on any occasion. In contrast, whitefish introduced to a VHS-positive farm were infected with VHSV genotype Id and started to replicate the virus for a short time during the trial. Whitefish are farmed together with, or in the vicinity of, farmed rainbow trout in the study area and, according to this study, are a possible source of the recurring infection in the restriction area. A sprivivirus was isolated from all fish species in the infection trial without causing mortality in the test groups.