Browsing by Subject "Arabidopsis thaliana"

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  • Tran, Cuong (Helsingin yliopisto, 2018)
    Salicylic acid (SA) is a well-known phytohormone involved in pathogen defense, development and controlling the cellular redox balance. In response to stresses, Arabidopsis thaliana synthesizes SA in the chloroplasts mainly via the isochorismate (IC) pathway: IC synthase (ICS) uses chorismate to produce IC, which is in turn converted to SA. ICS1 is the rate limiting enzyme in SA biosynthesis. The ICS1 protein localizes in the chloroplasts and contains a chloroplast transit peptide sequence, which is the first 45 amino acids in the N-terminus. Under different light conditions, plants employ different stress defense strategies. In a previous study, wild type (WT) Arabidopsis thaliana ecotype Columbia-0 grown under different light conditions [short day (SD; 8h light/16h dark), long day (LD; 16h light/8h dark) and 12h light/12h dark] was exposed to ozone for 1 hour (350 ppb). In a phosphoproteomic approach to study signaling mechanisms, ICS1 has been found as an in vivo phosphoprotein in ozone-treated plants grown under SD condition by mass spectrometry (MS). To analyze the phosphorylation of ICS1 in vitro, WT and phospho-negative ICS1 proteins were produced recombinantly as GST-fusion proteins in E. coli and used as the substrates for targeted kinase assays. Phospho-negative ICS1 protein was generated by mutating the phospho-sites to alanines by site-directed mutagenesis. ICS1 could be phosphorylated either in the cytosol or in the chloroplasts. Therefore, different cytosolic kinases, which are involved in various stress signaling events, and a chloroplast protein kinase that functions as a dominant regulator of chloroplast processes, were selected as the kinases to be tested. In this study, GST-ICS1 could be successfully phosphorylated in vitro. To a similar extent, GST-phospho-negative ICS1 was phosphorylated, indicating that ICS1 was phosphorylated in vitro at sites that were different from the ones found by MS from plant material. In order to study the identified phospho-sites in vivo, transgenic Arabidopsis carrying WT, phospho-positive, and phospho-negative ICS1 proteins were generated. Transgenic plants were confirmed by genotyping. Western blotting was carried out to evaluate ECFP-WT ICS1 protein expression. However, none of the transgenic plants could be confirmed to carry ECFP-WT ICS1. Additionally, an antibody against AtICS1 produced by the company Agrisera was tested for its specificity against the endogenous ICS1 protein. While the antibody could detect recombinant GST-ICS1 protein, ICS1 could not be detected from a total protein extract.
  • Eusuf, Saad Bin (Helsingin yliopisto, 2020)
    Stress response in plants is influenced by several external and internal factors and is executed in a modular way. Environmental stimuli or stress is sensed by cellular receptors and the signal is transduced inside cell via the phospho-activation of highly conserved intracellular signaling cascades like mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades. The signal then activates biosynthesis pathways of major stress response hormones like Salicylic acid (SA). In Arabidopsis about 90% SA is synthesized via isochorismate pathway and Isochorismate synthase 1 (ICS1) is a rate limiting enzyme in this pathway. In this study, goal was to select transgenic ICS1 (homozygous) candidate lines from parent ICS1-CFP by selective regeneration. Then, by molecular and physiological characterization of transgenic ICS1-CFP plants, the function of ICS1 phosphorylation, more specifically, impact of different photoperiods (Long day; LD and Short day; SD) and stress conditions on ICS1 activity would have resolved. However, there were no homozygous candidate line from any parent ICS1-CFP plants after several screening. Nevertheless, ozone treated stress sensitivity test was performed with heterozygous ICS1-CFP candidate plants (T2 generation). Ozone treated stress depends on stomata factor because ozone enters into plants through stomata. Therefore, stomata index analysis was performed with sid2 and WT (Col-0) phenotypes and grown in LD and SD conditions. Since, stomata number was different between LD and SD plants of both sid2 and WT phenotypes, a different method named Xanthine-Xanthine oxidase (X/XO) treatment was applied that induce oxidative stress regardless of stomata. Although, WT and sid2 had shown sensitivity to the treatment, the overall cell death percentage was very low. Lastly, our aim was to observe the impact of different photoperiods on the activation of two particular MAPKs i.e MPK3 and MPK6 under stress conditions. The phosphorylated (P-MPK3 and P-MPK6) are found abundantly in ozone treated plants as an early response. In this experiment, plants were grown in both LD and SD, stressed with both ozone and X/XO treatments, the activation of P-MPK3 and P-MPK6 was observed by protein level analysis (western blotting) in detailed time course. Although, the activation was visualized in both LD and SD plants, qualitatively the pattern was similar between day type samples and activation signal was very weak in both stress methods. In addition, anti-ICS1 antibody provided by Agrsera TM was tested for its efficiency to detect endogenous ICS1 protein in plants in two experimental set-up. Although the antibody could detect overexpressed ICS1-CFP protein in samples, it was not that efficient to detect endogenous ICS1 in any of the experiments.
  • Wirthmueller, Lennart; Asai, Shuta; Rallapalli, Ghanasyam; Sklenar, Jan; Fabro, Georgina; Kim, Dae Sung; Lintermann, Ruth; Jaspers, Pinja; Wrzaczek, Michael; Kangasjärvi, Jaakko; MacLean, Daniel; Menke, Frank L. H.; Banfield, Mark J.; Jones, Jonathan D. G. (2018)
    The oomycete pathogen Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis (Hpa) causes downy mildew disease on Arabidopsis. To colonize its host, Hpa translocates effector proteins that suppress plant immunity into infected host cells. Here, we investigate the relevance of the interaction between one of these effectors, HaRxL106, and Arabidopsis RADICAL-INDUCED CELL DEATH1 (RCD1). We use pathogen infection assays as well as molecular and biochemical analyses to test the hypothesis that HaRxL106 manipulates RCD1 to attenuate transcriptional activation of defense genes. We report that HaRxL106 suppresses transcriptional activation of salicylic acid (SA)-induced defense genes and alters plant growth responses to light. HaRxL106-mediated suppression of immunity is abolished in RCD1 loss-of-function mutants. We report that RCD1-type proteins are phosphorylated, and we identified Mut9-like kinases (MLKs), which function as phosphoregulatory nodes at the level of photoreceptors, as RCD1-interacting proteins. An mlk1,3,4 triple mutant exhibits stronger SA-induced defense marker gene expression compared with wild-type plants, suggesting that MLKs also affect transcriptional regulation of SA signaling. Based on the combined evidence, we hypothesize that nuclear RCD1/MLK complexes act as signaling nodes that integrate information from environmental cues and pathogen sensors, and that the Arabidopsis downy mildew pathogen targets RCD1 to prevent activation of plant immunity.
  • Kemppinen, Jasmin (Helsingin yliopisto, 2020)
    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are one of the prominent groups of signal compounds that are produced in stress conditions such as excess light. Nuclear protein RADICAL-INDUCED CELL DEAT (RCD1) is sensitive to ROS and controls the expression of organelle components, e.g. mitochondrial alternative oxidases (AOX), thus balancing the redox-status of a plant cell. Plants have fast responses to fluctuating light conditions that happen even before gene expression: i.e. readjusting the capability to receive light energy between the two photosystems by state transitions and increasing the capacity to remove excess energy by non-photochemical quenching (NPQ). Various small auxiliary proteins function in these fast acclimation events. However, many of them are identified on gene level only. The goal of this master’s thesis is to describe the role of a hypothetical protein, PPD8 in Arabidopsis thaliana. We evaluate how PPD8 is associated with RCD1 and a chloroplast thiol-regulator enzyme NTRC. We created double (rcd1 ppd8) and triple mutant plant lines (rcd1 ppd8 ntrc) by crossing single knockout lines ppd8, rcd1 and ntrc. Photosynthetic performance, NPQ and sensitivity to ROS were observed in each line by using two different chlorophyll fluorescence measurement methods: pulse-amplitude-modulation (PAM) and novel OJIP imaging fluorometry. The leaves were exposed to methyl viologen (MV), which accelerates the chloroplastic ROS production in light, and also to hypoxic conditions in order to study how the effect of MV is altered in low concentrations of oxygen. Additionally, we examined the amount of photosynthetic proteins and stoichiometry of photosystems in ppd8, rcd1 and rcd1 ppd8 by immunological methods. Finally, PPD8 gene with attached hemagglutinin encoding tags was generated by cloning and reintroduced back to the ppd8 knockout lines. Plants lacking RCD1 are very tolerant against MV and ROS, but when rcd1 was crossed with ppd8 the resistance was suppressed. Both rcd1 ppd8 and ppd8 exhibited elevated chlorophyll fluorescence and NPQ values. The removal of PPD8 gene had an impact on the abundance and the stoichiometry of photosynthetic proteins reducing the plants’ performance. When RCD1, PPD8 and NTRC were simultaneously absent the plants had major defects: their NPQ and fluorescence values were drastically increased. Furthermore, several results hinted towards possible issues in the function of ATP synthase in ppd8 background plants. It is also known that NTRC regulates ATP synthase: taken together, the results suggest that PPD8 is necessary for a fully operative ATP synthase and photosynthetic machinery. By reintroducing PPD8 to knockout line ppd8, the phenotype could be reverted back to wild type -like, thus confirming the significance of the PPD8 gene product in plant.
  • Wang, Fang; Robson, T Matthew; Casal, Jorge J; Aphalo, Pedro J. (2020)
    The UV-A/blue photoreceptors phototropins and cryptochromes are both known to contribute to stomatal opening (∆gs) in blue light. However, their relative contributions to maintenance of gs in blue light through the whole photoperiod remains unknown. To elucidate this question, Arabidopsis phot1 phot2 and cry1 cry2 mutants (MTs) and their respective wild types (WTs) were irradiated with 200 μmol m-2 s-1 of blue-, green- or red-light (BL, GL or RL) throughout a 11-hour photoperiod. Stomatal conductance (gs) was higher under BL, than under RL or GL. Under RL, gs was not affected by either of the photoreceptor mutations, but under GL gs was slightly lower in cry1 cry2 than its WT. Under BL, the presence of phototropins was essential for rapid stomatal opening at the beginning of the photoperiod, while maximal stomatal opening beyond 3 h of irradiation required both phototropins and cryptochromes. Time courses of whole-plant net carbon assimilation rate (Anet) and the effective quantum yield of photosystem II photochemistry (ΦPSII) were consistent with an Anet-independent contribution of BL on gs both in phot1 phot2 and cry1 cry2 mutants. The changing roles of phototropins and cryptochromes through the day may allow more flexible coordination between gs and Anet.
  • Nuorti, Ninni (Helsingfors universitet, 2017)
    DRama Queen (DRQ) is an unknown conserved gene that might be involved with sensing cytokinin signalling in the roots of Arabidopsis thaliana. It was originally found in a mutant screen when a mutated version of it – mDRQ – was found to improve the cytokinin sensitivity of plants in a desensitized genetic background. This thesis was done to define the protoxylem phenotype of mDRQ single mutant in Columbia (Col-0) background and to test the functionality of the gene by analyzing the complementation lines. The protoxylem phenotypes were scored from fuchsin stained samples by DIC microscopy. Protoxylem differentiation in the root of A. thaliana is an outcome of a mutually inhibitory signalling mechanism of auxins and cytokinins. Analysis of protoxylem status is a good tool for studying the cytokinin signalling because the differentiation is affected both by increased and reduced signalling levels. High signalling causes loss of protoxylem phenotypes whereas whereas low cytokinin signalling leads to ectopic protoxylem formation. The data of this thesis was analysed by SPSS version 22 software using cumulative logit modelling for the analysis. It was considered to be the most suitable alternative for analysis since the protoxylem phenotype data is ordinal by its nature. A protoxylem phenotype distribution was defined for mDRQ line and it was statistically different from Col-0. Most of the complementation lines were functional at a statistically significant level though the phenotype distributions of the complementation lines were not identical with original background. The difference could possibly be explained by the fact that the mDRQ gene is partially functional and may influence the phenotype distributions.
  • Shapiguzov, Alexey; Nikkanen, Lauri; Fitzpatrick, Duncan; Vainonen, Julia P.; Gossens, Richard; Alseekh, Saleh; Aarabi, Fayezeh; Tiwari, Arjun; Blokhina, Olga; Panzarova, Klara; Benedikty, Zuzana; Tyystjärvi, Esa; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Trtilek, Martin; Aro, Eva-Mari; Rintamäki, Eevi; Kangasjarvi, Jaakko (2020)
    The Arabidopsis mutant rcd1 is tolerant to methyl viologen (MV). MV enhances the Mehler reaction, i.e. electron transfer from Photosystem I (PSI) to O-2, generating reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the chloroplast. To study the MV tolerance of rcd1, we first addressed chloroplast thiol redox enzymes potentially implicated in ROS scavenging. NADPH-thioredoxin oxidoreductase type C (NTRC) was more reduced in rcd1. NTRC contributed to the photosynthetic and metabolic phenotypes of rcd1, but did not determine its MV tolerance. We next tested rcd1 for alterations in the Mehler reaction. In rcd1, but not in the wild type, the PSI-to-MV electron transfer was abolished by hypoxic atmosphere. A characteristic feature of rcd1 is constitutive expression of mitochondrial dysfunction stimulon (MDS) genes that affect mitochondrial respiration. Similarly to rcd1, in other MDS-overexpressing plants hypoxia also inhibited the PSI-to-MV electron transfer. One possible explanation is that the MDS gene products may affect the Mehler reaction by altering the availability of O-2. In green tissues, this putative effect is masked by photosynthetic O-2 evolution. However, O-2 evolution was rapidly suppressed in MV-treated plants. Transcriptomic meta-analysis indicated that MDS gene expression is linked to hypoxic response not only under MV, but also in standard growth conditions. This article is part of the theme issue 'Retrograde signalling from endosymbiotic organelles'.
  • Kaeppel, Sandra; Eggeling, Ralf; Ruempler, Florian; Groth, Marco; Melzer, Rainer; Theissen, Guenter (2021)
    Key message We studied the DNA-binding profile of the MADS-domain transcription factor SEPALLATA3 and mutant variants by SELEX-seq. DNA-binding characteristics of SEPALLATA3 mutant proteins lead us to propose a novel DNA-binding mode. MIKC-type MADS-domain proteins, which function as essential transcription factors in plant development, bind as dimers to a 10-base-pair AT-rich motif termed CArG-box. However, this consensus motif cannot fully explain how the abundant family members in flowering plants can bind different target genes in specific ways. The aim of this study was to better understand the DNA-binding specificity of MADS-domain transcription factors. Also, we wanted to understand the role of a highly conserved arginine residue for binding specificity of the MADS-domain transcription factor family. Here, we studied the DNA-binding profile of the floral homeotic MADS-domain protein SEPALLATA3 by performing SELEX followed by high-throughput sequencing (SELEX-seq). We found a diverse set of bound sequences and could estimate the in vitro binding affinities of SEPALLATA3 to a huge number of different sequences. We found evidence for the preference of AT-rich motifs as flanking sequences. Whereas different CArG-boxes can act as SEPALLATA3 binding sites, our findings suggest that the preferred flanking motifs are almost always the same and thus mostly independent of the identity of the central CArG-box motif. Analysis of SEPALLATA3 proteins with a single amino acid substitution at position 3 of the DNA-binding MADS-domain further revealed that the conserved arginine residue, which has been shown to be involved in a shape readout mechanism, is especially important for the recognition of nucleotides at positions 3 and 8 of the CArG-box motif. This leads us to propose a novel DNA-binding mode for SEPALLATA3, which is different from that of other MADS-domain proteins known.
  • Johansson, Karin S. L.; El-Soda, Mohamed; Pagel, Ellen; Meyer, Rhonda C.; Toldsepp, Kadri; Nilsson, Anders K.; Brosche, Mikael; Kollist, Hannes; Uddling, Johan; Andersson, Mats X. (2020)
    Background and Aims The stomatal conductance (g(s)) of most plant species decreases in response to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration. This response could have a significant impact on plant water use in a future climate. However, the regulation of the CO2 induced stomatal closure response is not fully understood. Moreover, the potential genetic links between short-term (within minutes to hours) and long-term (within weeks to months) responses of g(s) to increased atmospheric CO2 have not been explored. Methods We used Arabidopsis thaliana recombinant inbred lines originating from accessions Col-0 (strong CO2 response) and C24 (weak CO2 response) to study short- and long-term controls of g(s) Quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping was used to identify loci controlling short- and long-term g(s) responses to elevated CO2 as well as other stomata-related traits. Key Results Short- and long-term stomatal responses to elevated CO2 were significantly correlated. Both short-and long-term responses were associated with a QTL, at the end of chromosome 2. The location of this QTL was confirmed using near-isogonic lines and it was fine-mapped to a 410-kb region. The QTL did not correspond to any known gene involved in stomatal closure and had no effect on the responsiveness to abscisic acid. Additionally, we identified numerous other loci associated with stomatal regulation. Conclusions We identified and confirmed the effect of a strong QTL corresponding to a yet unknown regulator of stomatal closure in response to elevated CO2 concentration. The correlation between short- and long-term stomatal CO2 responses and the genetic link between these traits highlight the importance of understanding guard cell CO2 signalling to predict and manipulate plant water use in a world with increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration. This study demonstrates the power of using natural variation to unravel the genetic regulation of complex traits.
  • Deger, Aysin Guzel; Scherzer, Sönke; Nuhkat, Maris; Kedzierska, Justyna; Kollist, Hannes; Brosche, Mikael; Unyayar, Serpil; Boudsocq, Marie; Hedrich, Rainer; Roelfsema, M. Rob G. (2015)
    During infection plants recognize microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs), and this leads to stomatal closure. This study analyzes the molecular mechanisms underlying this MAMP response and its interrelation with ABA signaling. Stomata in intact Arabidopsis thaliana plants were stimulated with the bacterial MAMP flg22, or the stress hormone ABA, by using the noninvasive nanoinfusion technique. Intracellular double-barreled microelectrodes were applied to measure the activity of plasma membrane ion channels. Flg22 induced rapid stomatal closure and stimulated the SLAC1 and SLAH3 anion channels in guard cells. Loss of both channels resulted in cells that lacked flg22-induced anion channel activity and stomata that did not close in response to flg22 or ABA. Rapid flg22-dependent stomatal closure was impaired in plants that were flagellin receptor (FLS2)-deficient, as well as in the ost1-2 (Open Stomata 1) mutant, which lacks a key ABA-signaling protein kinase. By contrast, stomata of the ABA protein phosphatase mutant abi1-1 (ABscisic acid Insensitive 1) remained flg22-responsive. These data suggest that the initial steps in flg22 and ABA signaling are different, but that the pathways merge at the level of OST1 and lead to activation of SLAC1 and SLAH3 anion channels.
  • Rai, Neha; Neugart, Susanne; Yan, Yan; Wang, Fang; Siipola, Sari M.; Lindfors, Anders V.; Winkler, Jana Barbro; Albert, Andreas; Brosche, Mikael; Lehto, Tarja; Morales, Luis O.; Aphalo, Pedro J. (2019)
    Cryptochromes (CRYs) and UV RESISTANCE LOCUS 8 (UVR8) photoreceptors perceive UV-A/blue (315-500 nm) and UV-B (280-315 nm) radiation in plants, respectively. While the roles of CRYs and UVR8 have been studied in separate controlled-environment experiments, little is known about the interaction between these photoreceptors. Here, Arabidopsis wild-type Ler, CRYs and UVR8 photoreceptor mutants (uvr8-2, cry1cry2 and cry1cry2uvr8-2), and a flavonoid biosynthesis-defective mutant (tt4) were grown in a sun simulator. Plants were exposed to filtered radiation for 17 d or for 6 h, to study the effects of blue, UV-A, and UV-B radiation. Both CRYs and UVR8 independently enabled growth and survival of plants under solar levels of UV, while their joint absence was lethal under UV-B. CRYs mediated gene expression under blue light. UVR8 mediated gene expression under UV-B radiation, and in the absence of CRYs, also under UV-A. This negative regulation of UVR8-mediated gene expression by CRYs was also observed for UV-B. The accumulation of flavonoids was also consistent with this interaction between CRYs and UVR8. In conclusion, we provide evidence for an antagonistic interaction between CRYs and UVR8 and a role of UVR8 in UV-A perception.
  • Cui, Fuqiang; Brosche, Mikael; Shapiguzov, Alexey; He, Xin-Qiang; Vainonen, Julia P.; Leppala, Johanna; Trotta, Andrea; Kangasjarvi, Saijaliisa; Salojarvi, Jarkko; Kangasjarvi, Jaakko; Overmyer, Kirk (2019)
    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are key signalling intermediates in plant metabolism, defence, and stress adaptation. In plants, both the chloroplast and mitochondria are centres of metabolic control and ROS production, which coordinate stress responses in other cell compartments. The herbicide and experimental tool, methyl viologen (MV) induces ROS generation in the chloroplast under illumination, but is also toxic in non-photosynthetic organisms. We used MV to probe plant ROS signalling in compartments other than the chloroplast. Taking a genetic approach in the model plant Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), we used natural variation, QTL mapping, and mutant studies with MV in the light, but also under dark conditions, when the chloroplast electron transport is inactive. These studies revealed a light-independent MV-induced ROS-signalling pathway, suggesting mitochondrial involvement. Mitochondrial Mn SUPEROXIDE DISMUTASE was required for ROS-tolerance and the effect of MV was enhanced by exogenous sugar, providing further evidence for the role of mitochondria. Mutant and hormone feeding assays revealed roles for stress hormones in organellar ROS-responses. The radical-induced cell death1 mutant, which is tolerant to MV-induced ROS and exhibits altered mitochondrial signalling, was used to probe interactions between organelles. Our studies suggest that mitochondria are involved in the response to ROS induced by MV in plants.
  • Zinchenko, Ganna (Helsingfors universitet, 2016)
    The characterization of flower-specific ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) components and identification of their functional molecular networks will help to elucidate the involvement of UPS in regulating flower development and/or flowering time and, therefore, reproductive success of the plant. UPS component COP1 ubiquitin E3 ligase is known to regulate flowering time. The earlier data suggests that COP1 could be involved in regulating cytokinin signaling possibly through Arabidopsis Response Regulator1 (ARR1) ubiquitination. ARR1 is a B-type cytokinin response regulator, and it has recently been shown to be an unstable protein. Furthermore, KMD, F-box protein in SCF E3 ligase complex, has been shown to interact with ARR1 as well. The aim of this study is the characterization of COP1 interaction with novel target proteins ARR1, ARR2, ARR10 and ARR12 that appear to be regulated in different ways. Moreover, KMD proteins were included within the study as a possible competitor of COP1 for interaction with ARR1. In order to perform interactome studies, yeast two-hybrid assay with a preceding molecular cloning of the genes of interest was used. The results can be used to unravel the role of ubiquitin mediated regulation of cytokinin pathway.
  • Järvi, Sari; Isojärvi, Janne; Kangasjärvi, Saijaliisa; Salojärvi, Jarkko; Mamedov, Fikret; Suorsa, Marjaana; Aro, Eva-Mari (2016)
    Chloroplasts play an important role in the cellular sensing of abiotic and biotic stress. Signals originating from photosynthetic light reactions, in the form of redox and pH changes, accumulation of reactive oxygen and electrophile species or stromal metabolites are of key importance in chloroplast retrograde signaling. These signals initiate plant acclimation responses to both abiotic and biotic stresses. To reveal the molecular responses activated by rapid fluctuations in growth light intensity, gene expression analysis was performed with Arabidopsis thaliana wild type and the tlp18.3 mutant plants, the latter showing a stunted growth phenotype under fluctuating light conditions (Biochem. J, 406, 415-425). Expression pattern of genes encoding components of the photosynthetic electron transfer chain did not differ between fluctuating and constant light conditions, neither in wild type nor in tlp18.3 plants, and the composition of the thylakoid membrane protein complexes likewise remained unchanged. Nevertheless, the fluctuating light conditions repressed in wild-type plants a broad spectrum of genes involved in immune responses, which likely resulted from shade-avoidance responses and their intermixing with hormonal signaling. On the contrary, in the tlp18.3 mutant plants there was an imperfect repression of defense-related transcripts upon growth under fluctuating light, possibly by signals originating from minor malfunction of the photosystem II (PSII) repair cycle, which directly or indirectly modulated the transcript abundances of genes related to light perception via phytochromes. Consequently, a strong allocation of resources to defense reactions in the tlp18.3 mutant plants presumably results in the stunted growth phenotype under fluctuating light.
  • Duarte, Gustavo Turqueto; Pandey, Prashant K.; Vaid, Neha; Alseekh, Saleh; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Nikoloski, Zoran; Laitinen, Roosa A. E. (2021)
    Nitrogen (N) is fundamental to plant growth, development and yield. Genes underlying N utilization and assimilation are well-characterized, but mechanisms underpinning plasticity of different phenotypes in response to N remain elusive. Here, using Arabidopsis thaliana accessions, we dissected the genetic architecture of plasticity in early and late rosette diameter, flowering time and yield, in response to three levels of N in the soil. Furthermore, we found that the plasticity in levels of primary metabolites were related with the plasticities of the studied traits. Genome-wide association analysis identified three significant associations for phenotypic plasticity, one for early rosette diameter and two for flowering time. We confirmed that the gene At1g19880, hereafter named as PLASTICITY OF ROSETTE TO NITROGEN 1 (PROTON1), encoding for a regulator of chromatin condensation 1 (RCC1) family protein, conferred plasticity of rosette diameter in response to N. Treatment of PROTON1 T-DNA line with salt implied that the reduced plasticity of early rosette diameter was not a general growth response to stress. We further showed that plasticities of growth and flowering-related traits differed between environmental cues, indicating decoupled genetic programs regulating these traits. Our findings provide a prospective to identify genes that stabilize performance under fluctuating environments.
  • Rahikainen, Moona; Trotta, Andrea; Alegre, Sara; Pascual, Jesus; Vuorinen, Katariina; Overmyer, Kirk; Moffatt, Barbara; Ravanel, Stephane; Glawischnig, Erich; Kangasjarvi, Saijaliisa (2017)
    Glucosinolates (GSL) of cruciferous plants comprise a major group of structurally diverse secondary compounds which act as deterrents against aphids and microbial pathogens and have large commercial and ecological impacts. While the transcriptional regulation governing the biosynthesis and modification of GSL is now relatively well understood, post-translational regulatory components that specifically determine the structural variation of indole glucosinolates have not been reported. We show that the cytoplasmic protein phosphatase 2A regulatory subunit B'gamma (PP2A-B'gamma) physically interacts with indole glucosinolate methyltransferases and controls the methoxylation of indole glucosinolates and the formation of 4-meth-oxy-indol-3-yl-methyl glucosinolate in Arabidopsis leaves. By taking advantage of proteomic approaches and metabolic analysis we further demonstrate that PP2A-B'gamma is required to control the abundance of oligomeric protein complexes functionally linked with the activated methyl cycle and the trans-methylation capacity of leaf cells. These findings highlight the key regulatory role of PP2A-B'gamma in methionine metabolism and provide a previously unrecognized perspective for metabolic engineering of glucosinolate metabolism in cruciferous plants.
  • Sipari, Nina; Lihavainen, Jenna; Shapiguzov, Alexey; Kangasjärvi, Jaakko; Keinänen, Markku (2020)
    Rcd1 (radical-induced cell death1) is an Arabidopsis thaliana mutant, which exhibits high tolerance to paraquat [methyl viologen (MV)], herbicide that interrupts photosynthetic electron transport chain causing the formation of superoxide and inhibiting NADPH production in the chloroplast. To understand the biochemical mechanisms of MV resistance and the role of RCD1 in oxidative stress responses, we performed metabolite profiling of wild type (Col-0) and rcd1 plants in light, after MV exposure and after prolonged darkness. The function of RCD1 has been extensively studied at transcriptomic and biochemical level, but comprehensive metabolite profiling of rcd1 mutant has not been conducted until now. The mutant plants exhibited very different metabolic features from the wild type under light conditions implying enhanced glycolytic activity, altered nitrogen and nucleotide metabolism. In light conditions, superoxide production was elevated in rcd1, but no metabolic markers of oxidative stress were detected. Elevated senescence-associated metabolite marker levels in rcd1 at early developmental stage were in line with its early-senescing phenotype and possible mitochondrial dysfunction. After MV exposure, a marked decline in the levels of glycolytic and TCA cycle intermediates in Col-0 suggested severe plastidic oxidative stress and inhibition of photosynthesis and respiration, whereas in rcd1 the results indicated sustained photosynthesis and respiration and induction of energy salvaging pathways. The accumulation of oxidative stress markers in both plant lines indicated that MV-resistance in rcd1 derived from the altered regulation of cellular metabolism and not from the restricted delivery of MV into the cells or chloroplasts. Considering the evidence from metabolomic, transcriptomic and biochemical studies, we propose that RCD1 has a negative effect on reductive metabolism and rerouting of the energy production pathways. Thus, the altered, highly active reductive metabolism, energy salvaging pathways and redox transfer between cellular compartments in rcd1 could be sufficient to avoid the negative effects of MV-induced toxicity.
  • Xiang, Jiale (Helsingin yliopisto, 2014)
    Flavonoids are a group of secondary metabolites, which are not only important for plants’ survival, but also have been found to have medicinal properties for human health. Several enzymes are involved in the flavonoid biosynthesis. It is thought that these enzymes work together and may form enzymatic complexes. But the way of these enzymes interact with each other is still not clear. In arabidopsis, the number of gene family members that encode these enzymes is less than in other model plants, which makes it as a suitable model to investigate the interactions of enzymes involved in the flavonoid biosynthetic pathway. In this study, ten full-length flavonoid pathway genes were successfully amplified from cDNA of the arabidopsis flower. They are PAL1, C4H, CHS, CHI, F3H, F3’H, DFR, FLS1, ANS and GT. These genes were cloned into different prey vectors (pPR3-N and pPR3-SUC) and bait vectors (pDHB1 and pBT3-SUC). After that, the constructs were transformed separately into yeast. The protein-protein interactions were analyzed via yeast two-hybrid system.
  • Davidsson, Pär; Broberg, Martin; Kariola, Tarja; Sipari, Nina; Pirhonen, Minna; Palva, E. T (BioMed Central, 2017)
    Abstract Background Oligogalacturonides (OGs) are important components of damage-associated molecular pattern (DAMP) signaling and influence growth regulation in plants. Recent studies have focused on the impact of long OGs (degree of polymerization (DP) from 10–15), demonstrating the induction of plant defense signaling resulting in enhanced defenses to necrotrophic pathogens. To clarify the role of trimers (trimeric OGs, DP3) in DAMP signaling and their impact on plant growth regulation, we performed a transcriptomic analysis through the RNA sequencing of Arabidopsis thaliana exposed to trimers. Results The transcriptomic data from trimer-treated Arabidopsis seedlings indicate a clear activation of genes involved in defense signaling, phytohormone signaling and a down-regulation of genes involved in processes related to growth regulation and development. This is further accompanied with improved defenses against necrotrophic pathogens triggered by the trimer treatment, indicating that short OGs have a clear impact on plant responses, similar to those described for long OGs. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that trimers are indeed active elicitors of plant defenses. This is clearly indicated by the up-regulation of genes associated with plant defense signaling, accompanied with improved defenses against necrotrophic pathogens. Moreover, trimers simultaneously trigger a clear down-regulation of genes and gene sets associated with growth and development, leading to stunted seedling growth in Arabidopsis.