Browsing by Subject "Archaeomusicology"

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  • Rainio, Riitta (Ekho verlag, 2013)
    Publications of the ICTM Study Group on Music Archaeology
    In this paper, I analyze and interpret the T-shaped antler artefact that was excavated from the 14th−15th century layers of the city of Turku, Finland. On the basis of the basic form, size, use-wear and raw material, the artefact is a drum hammer of Saami origin. Although the ornaments are uncharacteristic of traditional Saami drum hammers, similar type of motifs can be found in another medieval drum hammer from Norway. In the medieval city of Turku, the drum hammer seems to have been in a use that was different from the original shamanistic one. On the basis of the archaeological context, the drum hammer was hidden in the floor construction of a dwelling house, most probably as a gift to the house spirit or some other kind of transcendent being. As similar deposits of sound-related artefacts and instruments can be found in the later Finnish folklore, it is possible to carry on the reasoning further. The hidden drum hammer can be interpreted as a special sound deposit, by which the drumming sound was transported to the other transcendent reality, where it protected the household in an inaudible way.
  • Kolltveit, Gjermund; Rainio, Riitta (Ekho verlag, 2020)
    Publications of the ICTM Study Group on Music Archaeology
    This book arose from an international symposium in Honour of Cajsa S. Lund that took place in 2016 at Linnaeus University’s Department of Music and Art, in Växjö, Sweden. The symposium was organized by Nordic music archaeologists Gjermund Kolltveit (Oslo) and Riitta Rainio (Helsinki), with Cornelius Holtorf and Karin Hallgren as local contributors at Linnaeus University. It was funded by the Swedish Research Council, the Nordic Culture Fund and Musik i Syd. The book is edited by Gjermund Kolltveit and Riitta Rainio, and published in Berlin by Ekho Verlag. The contributors are Cornelius Holtorf, Iain Morley, Catherine Homo-Lechner, Emiliano Li Castro, Rupert Till, Frances Gill, Annemies Tamboer, Graeme Lawson, Stefan Hagel, Timo Leisiö, Anders Söderberg, Dorota Popławska, Andrzej Janowski, Stanisław Mazurek, Simon Wyatt, Raquel Jiménez Pasalodos, Riitta Rainio, John Purser, Joachim Schween and Cajsa S. Lund.
  • Rainio, Riitta (2014)
    Archaeological excavations in Finland have uncovered a large amount of bells, pellet bells and other objects created for producing sound. These findings offer us a new, fascinating sonic window into the so far unknown soundscape of the Iron Age and complement the writing of history of more recent eras.
  • Shpinitskaya, Julia; Rainio, Riitta (Routledge, 2021)
    Routledge Research in Cultural and Media Studies
    The archaeoacoustic team of the University of Helsinki has been studying how sacred sites in Northern Europe, used by shamanic cultures since prehistoric times, are home to remarkable acoustic properties. This chapter focuses on natural-site acoustics as a magic tool in ritual practices. Based on our acoustic measurements as well as experimental sound tests carried out during in situ studies of prehistoric and historic sacred sites in Finland, we discuss possible sound media (voice, instruments, noise), performing techniques and methods of sound production used at the sites. While the acoustic study of the sacred sites is at the core of our research, we also discuss the visual aspects and visual phenomena observed at the sites during our fieldwork. Our attempt to restore the sound culture of shamanism associated with the hosting sites and their sound potential profoundly rests on ethnographic research of the Finno-Ugric peoples, predominantly the Sámi and the Finns. The end result of this ethnographic and practical research study is our interpretation of the shamanic ritual practices as seen through the prism of the miraculous acoustic illusions and visual appearances created by the sacred sites.
  • Kolltveit, Gjermund; Rainio, Riitta; Archaeology (Ekho verlag, 2020)
    Publications of the ICTM Study Group on Music Archaeology
    This book arose from an international symposium in Honour of Cajsa S. Lund that took place in 2016 at Linnaeus University’s Department of Music and Art, in Växjö, Sweden. The symposium was organized by Nordic music archaeologists Gjermund Kolltveit (Oslo) and Riitta Rainio (Helsinki), with Cornelius Holtorf and Karin Hallgren as local contributors at Linnaeus University. It was funded by the Swedish Research Council, the Nordic Culture Fund and Musik i Syd. The book is edited by Gjermund Kolltveit and Riitta Rainio, and published in Berlin by Ekho Verlag. The contributors are Cornelius Holtorf, Iain Morley, Catherine Homo-Lechner, Emiliano Li Castro, Rupert Till, Frances Gill, Annemies Tamboer, Graeme Lawson, Stefan Hagel, Timo Leisiö, Anders Söderberg, Dorota Popławska, Andrzej Janowski, Stanisław Mazurek, Simon Wyatt, Raquel Jiménez Pasalodos, Riitta Rainio, John Purser, Joachim Schween and Cajsa S. Lund.
  • Mannermaa, Kristiina; Rainio, Riitta (Oxbow Books, 2013)
    Tubular bone artefacts of different size and form are commonly found in the Middle Neolithic inhumation burials in Gotland and Öland, Sweden. These burials were made by the people of the so-called Scandinavian Pitted Ware Culture. Small tubular artefacts have commonly been interpreted as beads used in decoration as they, in many cases, appear in clusters at the head region and along the body. In 1998 at Ajvide, archaeologists discovered a grave (62), which contained a large number of grave goods, among them tubular bone artefacts of an extraordinary character. Based on their outlook, these single or two-pieced artefacts with or without pierced holes were interpreted as flutes. Their suitability for sound production, however, has never been studied systematically. In this article, we will discuss the presence and function of the different tubular bone artefacts found in grave 62. We will describe the finds, sort them tentatively and report possible ethnographical parallels. The article is intended as an introduction to the research project, which seeks to analyze the organological structures of the artefacts and reassess their interpretation as musical instruments. The find contexts of the artefacts, as well as, the grave entity with all other artefacts, will be studied from the perspective of music archaeology.