Browsing by Subject "Arthroplasty"

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  • Ayeni, Olufemi R.; Simunovic, Nicole; Crouch, Sarah; Grassby, Maggie Hamel-Smith; Hoyeck, Patricia; Islam, Zakia; Wood, Gavin; Jorgensen, Uffe; Seppanen, Matti; Junnila, Mika; Virolainen, Petri; Routapohja, Mari; Sihvonen, Raine; Raivio, Marko; Toivonen, Pirjo; Joukainen, Antti; Kaariainen, Tommi; Jalava, Elina; Jarvinen, Teppo; FIRST Investigators (2015)
    Background: Several cross-sectional studies have estimated that the prevalence of femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) ranges from 14-17% among asymptomatic young adults to almost 95% among competitive athletes. With FAI, there is abnormal contact between the proximal femur and the acetabulum, resulting in abnormal mechanics with terminal motion such as hip flexion and rotation. This condition results from bony anomalies of the acetabular rim (Pincer) and or femoral head/neck junction (CAM) and typically causes hip pain and decreased hip function. The development of hip pain potentially serves as an indicator for early cartilage and labral damage that may result in hip osteoarthritis. Although surgical correction of the misshaped bony anatomy and associated intra-articular soft tissue damage of the hip is thought to improve hip pain and alter the natural history of degenerative disease, the supportive evidence is based upon low quality observational studies. The Femoroacetabular Impingement RandomiSed controlled Trial (FIRST) compares outcomes following surgical correction of the impingement morphology (arthroscopic osteochondroplasty) with/without labral repair versus arthroscopic lavage of the hip joint in adults aged 18 to 50 diagnosed with FAI. Methods and design: FIRST is a multi-centre, randomized controlled trial with a sample size of 220 patients. Exclusion criteria include the presence of hip syndromes, previous surgery or trauma to the affected hip, and significant medical comorbidities. The primary outcome is pain and the secondary outcomes include patient function, quality of life, complications, and cost-effectiveness - all within one year of follow-up. Patients are stratified based on centre and impingement sub-type. Patients, outcome assessors, data analysts, and the Steering Committee are blinded to surgical allocation. Using an intention-to-treat approach, outcome analyses will be performed using an analysis of covariance and descriptive statistics. Discussion: Symptomatic FAI is associated with chronic hip pain, functional limitations, and secondary osteoarthritis. Therefore, optimizing treatment has the potential to improve the lives millions of young, active persons who are diagnosed with this condition. Few orthopaedic surgical trials have similar potential to shift the paradigm of care dramatically towards (or away) from surgical bony and soft tissue interventions.
  • Kosola, Jussi; Kaipia, Antti; Laitinen, Minna K.; Nieminen, Jyrki (2017)
    Purpose One-third of hip fractures occur in men. The causes underlying hip fractures in men differ from those in women and include alcohol abuse. This retrospective register study evaluated the trends and results associated with different surgical treatment methods for nondisplaced and displaced femoral neck fractures in male patients with alcohol dependence syndrome. Methods Men with hip fractures were identified from a local district hospital database. Alcohol dependence syndrome was identified as a diagnosis in medical records. Results For displaced fractures, implant survival after total hip arthroplasty was significantly lower compared to hemiarthroplasty. For nondisplaced fractures, implant survival of cannulated screws was significantly lower compared to sliding hip screws. Overall patient survival for males with alcohol dependence syndrome with hip fracture was 62% at 1 year and 49% at 2 years. Patient survival in this population did not differ between displaced and nondisplaced fractures or among different surgical methods. Conclusion Patients with alcoholism who had documented evidence of alcohol dependence syndrome represented nearly half of patients
  • Saku, S. A.; Linko, R.; Madanat, R. (2020)
    Background and Aims: Emergency Response Teams have been employed by hospitals to evaluate and manage patients whose condition is rapidly deteriorating. In this study, we aimed to assess the outcomes of triggering the Emergency Response Teams at a high-volume arthroplasty center, determine which factors trigger the Emergency Response Teams, and investigate the main reasons for an unplanned intensive care unit admission following Emergency Response Team intervention. Material and Methods: We gathered data by evaluating all Emergency Response Team forms filled out during a 4-year period (2014-2017), and by assessing the medical records. The collected data included age, gender, time of and reason for the Emergency Response Teams call, and interventions performed during the Emergency Response Teams intervention. The results are reported as percentages, mean +/- standard deviation, or median (interquartile range), where appropriate. All patients were monitored for 30 days to identify possible intensive care unit admissions, surgeries, and death. Results: The mean patient age was 72 (46-92) years and 40 patients (62%) were female. The Emergency Response Teams was triggered a total of 65 times (61 patients). The most common Emergency Response Team call criteria were low oxygen saturation, loss or reduction of consciousness, and hypotension. Following the Emergency Response Team call, 36 patients (55%) could be treated in the ward, and 29 patients (45%) were transferred to the intensive care unit. The emergency that triggered the Emergency Response Teams was most commonly caused by drug-related side effects (12%), pneumonia (8%), pulmonary embolism (8%), and sepsis (6%). Seven patients (11%) died during the first 30 days after the Emergency Response Teams call. Conclusion: Although all 65 patients met the Emergency Response Teams call criteria, potentially having severe emergencies, half of the patients could be treated in the arthroplasty ward. Emergency Response Team intervention appears useful in addressing concerns that can potentially lead to unplanned intensive care unit admission, and the Emergency Response Teams trigger threshold seems appropriate as only 3% of the Emergency Response Teams calls required no intervention.
  • Pulkkinen, Maria; Jousela, Irma; Engblom, Janne; Salanterä, Sanna; Junttila, Kristiina (2020)
    Background: The shortened length of hospital stays (LOS) requires efficient and patient-participatory perioperative nursing approaches to enable early and safe discharge from hospitals for patients undergoing total hip arthroplasty (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The primary aim of this study was to explore the effect comparative to standard perioperative care of a new perioperative practice model (NPPM) on the LOS and the time points of the surgical care process in patients undergoing THA and TKA under spinal anesthesia. The secondary aim was to find out if any subgroups with different response could be found. Methods: Patients scheduled for elective, primary THA and TKA were assessed for eligibility. A two-group parallel randomized clinical trial was conducted with an intervention group (n = 230) and control group (n = 220), totaling 450 patients. The patients in the intervention group were each designated with one named anesthesia nurse, who took care of the patient during the entire perioperative process and visited the patient postoperatively. The patients in the control group received standard perioperative care from different nurses during their perioperative processes and without postoperative visits. The surgical care process time points for each study patient were gathered from the operating room management software and hospital information system until hospital discharge. Results: We did not find any statistically significant differences between the intervention and control groups regarding to LOS. Only slight differences in the time points of the surgical care process could be detected. The subgroup examination revealed that higher age, type of arthroplasty and ASA score 3-4 all separately caused prolonged LOS. Conclusion: We did not find the new perioperative practice model to shorten either length of hospital stays or the surgical care process in patients undergoing THA and TKA. Further studies at the subgroup level (gender, old age, and ASA score 3 and 4) are needed to recognize the patients who might benefit most from the NPPM.
  • Pulkkinen, Maria; Jousela, Irma; Engblom, Janne; Salanterä, Sanna; Junttila, Kristiina (BioMed Central, 2020)
    Abstract Background The shortened length of hospital stays (LOS) requires efficient and patient-participatory perioperative nursing approaches to enable early and safe discharge from hospitals for patients undergoing total hip arthroplasty (THA) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The primary aim of this study was to explore the effect comparative to standard perioperative care of a new perioperative practice model (NPPM) on the LOS and the time points of the surgical care process in patients undergoing THA and TKA under spinal anesthesia. The secondary aim was to find out if any subgroups with different response could be found. Methods Patients scheduled for elective, primary THA and TKA were assessed for eligibility. A two-group parallel randomized clinical trial was conducted with an intervention group (n = 230) and control group (n = 220), totaling 450 patients. The patients in the intervention group were each designated with one named anesthesia nurse, who took care of the patient during the entire perioperative process and visited the patient postoperatively. The patients in the control group received standard perioperative care from different nurses during their perioperative processes and without postoperative visits. The surgical care process time points for each study patient were gathered from the operating room management software and hospital information system until hospital discharge. Results We did not find any statistically significant differences between the intervention and control groups regarding to LOS. Only slight differences in the time points of the surgical care process could be detected. The subgroup examination revealed that higher age, type of arthroplasty and ASA score 3–4 all separately caused prolonged LOS. Conclusion We did not find the new perioperative practice model to shorten either length of hospital stays or the surgical care process in patients undergoing THA and TKA. Further studies at the subgroup level (gender, old age, and ASA score 3 and 4) are needed to recognize the patients who might benefit most from the NPPM. Trial registration This study was registered in NIH Clinical.Trials.gov under registration number NCT02906033 , retrospectively registered September 19, 2016.
  • Danielson, Heidi; Lassila, Riitta; Ylinen, Pekka; Yrjönen, Timo (2017)
    AIM To collect data from joint replacement in inhibitor patients, evaluate haemostatic and patient outcomes, and analyse the costs. METHODS We report our 21-year, single-centre cumulative experience of 15 joint arthroplasties in six inhibitor patients. RESULTS Two low responder inhibitor patients were in the early days treated with FVIII, whereas bypassing agents were used in the rest of the high responder patients. The primary haemostatic outcome was good in 8/15, fair in 4/15 and poor in 3/15 operations. The overall patient outcome, including joint health and patient satisfaction, was good in 10/15, fair 4/15 and poor in 1/15. No deep infections were observed. Cost analysis was most beneficial in low responders and in two immune-tolerized, high responder patients. In all cases, factor replacement comprised the main treatment costs. CONCLUSION Our experience supports the initial use of bypassing agents as well as preoperative immune-tolerance induction when possible. Despite the challenges of haemostasis and severe joint disease, total joint arthroplasty can reach a good outcome, even in inhibitor patients. The risk for deep infection might be smaller than previously reported. Individual planning, intense multidisciplinary teamwork and execution of operations should be centralised in a professional unit.