Browsing by Subject "Asia"

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  • Särkinen, Tiina; Poczai, Péter; Barboza, Gloria; van der Weerden, Gerard M.; Baden, Maria; Knapp, Sandra (2018)
    The Morelloid Glade, also known as the black nightshades or "Maurella" (Morella), is one of the 10 major Glades within Solanum L. The pantropical Glade consists of 75 currently recognised non-spiny herbaceous and suffrutescent species with simple or branched hairs with or without glandular tips, with a centre of distribution in the tropical Andes. A secondary centre of diversity is found in Africa, where a set of mainly polyploid taxa occur. A yet smaller set of species is found in Australasia and Europe, including Solanum nigrum L., the type of the genus Solanum. Due to the large number of published synonyms, combined with complex morphological variation, our understanding of species limits and diversity in the Morelloid Glade has remained poor despite detailed morphological studies carried out in conjunction with breeding experiments. Here we provide the first taxonomic overview since the 19th century of the entire group in the Old World, including Africa, Asia, Australia, Europe and islands of the Pacific. Complete synonymy, morphological descriptions, distribution maps and common names and uses are provided for all 19 species occurring outside the Americas (i.e. Africa, Asia, Australia, Europe and islands of the Pacific). We treat 12 species native to the Old World, as well as 7 taxa that are putatively introduced and/or invasive in the region. The current knowledge of the origin of the polyploid species is summarised. A key to all of the species occurring in the Old World is provided, together with line drawings and colour figures to aid identification both in herbaria and in the field. Preliminary conservation assessments arc provided for all species.
  • Natunen, Anu (2002)
    The Asian crisis in 1997-98 was different to prior crises experienced in Europe (1992-93) and Mexico (1994-95). In the Asian crisis shock sensitivity seemed to be liked to financial weaknesses and other structural fragilities rather than weak macroeconomic fundamentals. Banks extended credits, enterprises were indebted with greater leverage and money was invested in the real estate even though investments’ output was not always productive. Credit availability increased as banks competed for customers, cutting back ex ante screening of projects and customer monitoring. Several researches have identified moral hazard caused by government bailout guarantees as the origin of the financial vulnerability in Asia at the time of crisis, explaining the irresponsible behavior of the corporate sector, banking sector, and investors. Due to the crisis’s microeconomic nature the traditional first- and second-generation currency crises models were not able to explain the Asian currency crisis and as a result third-generation models have emerged. This thesis aims to find answers to the following questions: (1) what was relevant in the Asian currency crisis, (2) when governments use exchange rates policies to bailout troubled companies, how can these bailout policies be explained theoretically, and (3) what other factors can affect the functionality of these exchange rate policies as bailout, when are they not a solution. In other words this paper presents an empirical and a theoretical approach to the Asian currency crisis and analyzes to what extent theoretical explanations are supported by empirical evidence. As a theoretical explanation to the Asian currency crisis this thesis presents a third-generation currency crises model by Bris and Koskinen (2002), based on an argument that bailing out financially distressed export companies through currency devaluation is optimal ex post for an economy. As a competing point of view to the model of Bris and Koskinen on the affect of devaluation on corporate sector, the paper presents a review of the theoretical work of Aghion et al. (2000) on currency crises, who argue that currency devaluation leads to further corporate balance-sheet deteriorating. Empirical evidence on the Asian currency crisis supports the implications of the model of Bris and Koskinen.
  • Irfan, Furqan B.; Bhutta, Zain Ali; Castren, Maaret; Straney, Lahn; Djarv, Therese; Tariq, Tooba; Thomas, Stephen Hodges; Alinier, Guillaume; Al Shaikh, Loua; Owen, Robert Campbell; Al Suwaidi, Jassim; Shuaib, Ashfaq; Singh, Rajvir; Cameron, Peter Alistair (2016)
    Background: Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) studies from the Middle East and Asian region are limited. This study describes the epidemiology, emergency health services, and outcomes of OHCA in Qatar. Methods: This was a prospective nationwide population-based observational study on OHCA patients in Qatar according to Utstein style guidelines, from June 2012 to May 2013. Data was collected from various sources; the national emergency medical service, 4 emergency departments, and 8 public hospitals. Results: The annual crude incidence of presumed cardiac OHCA attended by EMS was 23.5 per 100,000. The age sex standardized incidence was 87.8 per 100,000 population. Of the 447 OHCA patients included in the final analysis, most were male (n = 360, 80.5%) with median age of 51 years (IQR = 39-66). Frequently observed nationalities were Qatari (n = 89, 19.9%), Indian (n = 74, 16.6%) and Nepalese (n = 52, 11.6%). Bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was carried out in 92 (20.6%) OHCA patients. Survival rate was 8.1% (n = 36) and multivariable logistic regression indicated that initial shockable rhythm (OR 13.4, 95% CI 5.4-33.3, p = 0.001) was associated with higher odds of survival while male gender (OR 0.27, 95% CI 0.1-0.8, p = 0.01) and advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) (OR 0.15, 95% CI 0.04-0.5, p = 0.02) were associated with lower odds of survival. Conclusions: Standardized incidence and survival rates were comparable to Western countries. Although expatriates comprise more than 80% of the population, Qataris contributed 20% of the total cardiac arrests observed. There are significant opportunities to improve outcomes, including community-based CPR and defibrillation training. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
  • Pilla, Rachel M.; Mette, Elizabeth M.; Williamson, Craig E.; Adamovich, Boris V.; Adrian, Rita; Anneville, Orlane; Balseiro, Esteban; Ban, Syuhei; Chandra, Sudeep; Colom-Montero, William; Devlin, Shawn P.; Dix, Margaret A.; Dokulil, Martin T.; Feldsine, Natalie A.; Feuchtmayr, Heidrun; Fogarty, Natalie K.; Gaiser, Evelyn E.; Girdner, Scott F.; González, María J.; Hambright, K. David; Hamilton, David P.; Havens, Karl; Hessen, Dag O.; Hetzenauer, Harald; Higgins, Scott N.; Huttula, Timo H.; Huuskonen, Hannu; Isles, Peter D. F.; Joehnk, Klaus D.; Keller, Wendel Bill; Klug, Jen; Knoll, Lesley B.; Korhonen, Johanna; Korovchinsky, Nikolai M.; Köster, Oliver; Kraemer, Benjamin M.; Leavitt, Peter R.; Leoni, Barbara; Lepori, Fabio; Lepskaya, Ekaterina V.; Lottig, Noah R.; Luger, Martin S.; Maberly, Stephen C.; MacIntyre, Sally; McBride, Chris; McIntyre, Peter; Melles, Stephanie J.; Modenutti, Beatriz; Müller-Navarra, Dörthe C.; Pacholski, Laura; Paterson, Andrew M.; Pierson, Don C.; Pislegina, Helen V.; Plisnier, Pierre-Denis; Richardson, David C.; Rimmer, Alon; Rogora, Michela; Rogozin, Denis Y.; Rusak, James A.; Rusanovskaya, Olga O.; Sadro, Steve; Salmaso, Nico; Saros, Jasmine E.; Sarvala, Jouko; Saulnier-Talbot, Émilie; Schindler, Daniel E.; Shimaraeva, Svetlana V.; Silow, Eugene A.; Sitoki, Lewis M.; Sommaruga, Ruben; Straile, Dietmar; Strock, Kristin E.; Swain, Hilary; Tallant, Jason M.; Thiery, Wim; Timofeyev, Maxim A.; Tolomeev, Alexander P.; Tominaga, Koji; Vanni, Michael J.; Verburg, Piet; Vinebrooke, Rolf D.; Wanzenböck, Josef; Weathers, Kathleen; Weyhenmeyer, Gesa A.; Zadereev, Egor S.; Zhukova, Tatyana V. (Nature, 2021)
    Scientific Data 8 (2021), 200
    Climate change and other anthropogenic stressors have led to long-term changes in the thermal structure, including surface temperatures, deepwater temperatures, and vertical thermal gradients, in many lakes around the world. Though many studies highlight warming of surface water temperatures in lakes worldwide, less is known about long-term trends in full vertical thermal structure and deepwater temperatures, which have been changing less consistently in both direction and magnitude. Here, we present a globally-expansive data set of summertime in-situ vertical temperature profiles from 153 lakes, with one time series beginning as early as 1894. We also compiled lake geographic, morphometric, and water quality variables that can influence vertical thermal structure through a variety of potential mechanisms in these lakes. These long-term time series of vertical temperature profiles and corresponding lake characteristics serve as valuable data to help understand changes and drivers of lake thermal structure in a time of rapid global and ecological change.
  • Global Burden of Disease Self-Harm Collaboration; Orpana, H.M.; Doku, D.T.; Meretoja, T.J.; Shiri, R.; Vasankari, T. (2019)
    Objectives To use the estimates from the Global Burden of Disease Study 2016 to describe patterns of suicide mortality globally, regionally, and for 195 countries and territories by age, sex, and Socio-demographic index, and to describe temporal trends between 1990 and 2016. Design Systematic analysis. Main outcome measures Crude and age standardised rates from suicide mortality and years of life lost were compared across regions and countries, and by age, sex, and Socio-demographic index (a composite measure of fertility, income, and education). Results The total number of deaths from suicide increased by 6.7% (95% uncertainty interval 0.4% to 15.6%) globally over the 27 year study period to 817 000 (762 000 to 884 000) deaths in 2016. However, the age standardised mortality rate for suicide decreased by 32.7% (27.2% to 36.6%) worldwide between 1990 and 2016, similar to the decline in the global age standardised mortality rate of 30.6%. Suicide was the leading cause of age standardised years of life lost in the Global Burden of Disease region of high income Asia Pacific and was among the top 10 leading causes in eastern Europe, central Europe, western Europe, central Asia, Australasia, southern Latin America, and high income North America. Rates for men were higher than for women across regions, countries, and age groups, except for the 15 to 19 age group. There was variation in the female to male ratio, with higher ratios at lower levels of Socio-demographic index. Women experienced greater decreases in mortality rates (49.0%, 95% uncertainty interval 42.6% to 54.6%) than men (23.8%, 15.6% to 32.7%). Conclusions Age standardised mortality rates for suicide have greatly reduced since 1990, but suicide remains an important contributor to mortality worldwide. Suicide mortality was variable across locations, between sexes, and between age groups. Suicide prevention strategies can be targeted towards vulnerable populations if they are informed by variations in mortality rates. © Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited.
  • Lähteenmäki-Uutela, A.; Marimuthu, S.B.; Meijer, N. (Wageningen Academic Publishers, 2021)
    Journal of Insects as Food and Feed 2021 7:5, 849-856
    Insects, as a food and or feed source, represent an emerging protein source relevant to farmers, feed companies, food companies and food marketers globally. The growth of this industry is somewhat restricted due to outdated food and feed regulations covering insect use. The regulations also do not allow the use of all potential insects as food and feed. Governments aim to ensure food and feed safety, and each country has its own substantive and procedural rules for this purpose. However, the regulatory demands and differences between countries complicate the international marketing strategies for insect products. Food and feed regulation are separate; feed regulation may allow insect usage even when they are not allowed as food. Some countries have specific rules for novel foods, while others do not. This paper compares insect food and feed regulation of the primary production and marketing areas: the European Union, the United States, Canada, and Australia. In addition, the situation in selected countries in Central and South America, Asia and Africa is also discussed.