Browsing by Subject "BRAIN-STIMULATION"

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  • Kortteenniemi, Aaron; Ortega-Alonso, Alfredo; Javadi, Amir-Homayoun; Tolmunen, Tommi; Ali-Sisto, Toni; Kotilainen, Tuukka; Wikgren, Jan; Karhunen, Leila; Velagapudi, Vidya; Lehto, Soili M. (2020)
    Background Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), a putative treatment for depression, has been proposed to affect peripheral metabolism. Metabolic products from brain tissue may also cross the blood-brain barrier, reflecting the conditions in the brain. However, there are no previous data regarding the effect of tDCS on circulating metabolites. Objective To determine whether five daily sessions of tDCS modulate peripheral metabolites in healthy adult men. Methods This double-blind, randomized controlled trial involved 79 healthy males (aged 20-40 years) divided into two groups, one receiving tDCS (2 mA) and the other sham stimulated. The anode was placed over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and the cathode over the corresponding contralateral area. Venous blood samples were obtained before and after the first stimulation session, and after the fifth stimulation session. Serum levels of 102 metabolites were determined by mass spectrometry. The results were analysed with generalised estimating equations corrected for the family-wise error rate. In addition, we performed power calculations estimating sample sizes necessary for future research. Results TDCS-related variation in serum metabolite levels was extremely small and statistically non-significant. Power calculations indicated that for the observed variation to be deemed significant, samples sizes of up to 11,000 subjects per group would be required, depending on the metabolite of interest. Conclusion Our study found that five sessions of tDCS induced no major effects on peripheral metabolites among healthy men. These observations support the view of tDCS as a safe treatment that does not induce significant changes in the measured peripheral metabolites in healthy male subjects.
  • Heikkinen, Paula H.; Pulvermüller, Friedemann; Mäkelä, Jyrki P.; Ilmoniemi, Risto J.; Lioumis, Pantelis; Kujala, Teija; Manninen, Riitta-Leena; Ahvenainen, Antti; Klippi, Anu (2019)
    Neuromodulation technologies, such as transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), are promising tools for neurorehabilitation, aphasia therapy included, but not yet in common clinical use. Combined with behavioral techniques, in particular treatment-efficient Intensive Language-Action Therapy (ILAT, previously CIAT or CILT), TMS could substantially amplify the beneficial effect of such behavioral therapy alone (Thiel et al., 2013; Martin et al., 2014; Mendoza et al., 2016; Kapoor, 2017). In this randomized study of 17 subjects with post-stroke aphasia in the chronic stage, we studied the combined effect of ILAT and 1-Hz placebo-controlled navigated repetitive TMS (rTMS) to the right-hemispheric inferior frontal cortex-that is, to the anterior part of the non-dominant hemisphere's homolog Broca's area (pars triangularis). Patients were randomized to groups A and B. Patients in group A received a 2-week period of rTMS during naming training where they named pictures displayed on the screen once every 10 s, followed by 2 weeks of rTMS and naming combined with ILAT. Patients in group B received the same behavioral therapy but TMS was replaced by sham stimulation. The primary outcome measures for changes in language performance were the Western Aphasia Battery's aphasia quotient AQ; the secondary outcome measures were the Boston naming test (BNT) and the Action naming test (Action BNT, ANT). All subjects completed the study. At baseline, no statistically significant group differences were discovered for age, post-stroke time or diagnosis. ILAT was associated with significant improvement across groups, as documented by both primary and secondary outcome measures. No significant effect of rTMS could be documented. Our results agree with previous results proving ILAT's ability to improve language in patients with chronic aphasia. In contrast with earlier claims, however, a beneficial effect of rTMS in chronic post-stroke aphasia rehabilitation was not detected in this study.
  • Näsi, Tiina; Mäki, Hanna; Kotilahti, Kalle; Nissila, Ilkka; Haapalahti, Petri; Ilmoniemi, Risto J. (2011)
  • Koponen, Lari M.; Nieminen, Jaakko O.; Ilmoniemi, Risto J. (2018)
    Background: Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a non-invasive brain stimulation method: a magnetic field pulse from a TMS coil can excite neurons in a desired location of the cortex. Conventional TMS coils cause focal stimulation underneath the coil centre; to change the location of the stimulated spot, the coil must be moved over the new target. This physical movement is inherently slow, which limits, for example, feedback-controlled stimulation. Objective: To overcome the limitations of physical TMS-coil movement by introducing electronic targeting. Methods: We propose electronic stimulation targeting using a set of large overlapping coils and introduce a matrix-factorisation-based method to design such sets of coils. We built one such device and demonstrated the electronic stimulation targeting in vivo. Results: The demonstrated two-coil transducer allows translating the stimulated spot along a 30-mmlong line segment in the cortex; with five coils, a target can be selected from within a region of the cortex and stimulated in any direction. Thus, far fewer coils are required by our approach than by previously suggested ones, none of which have resulted in practical devices. Conclusion: Already with two coils, we can adjust the location of the induced electric field maximum along one dimension, which is sufficient to study, for example, the primary motor cortex. (C) 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc.
  • Krieg, Sandro M.; Lioumis, Pantelis; Mäkelä, Jyrki P.; Wilenius, Juha; Karhu, Jari; Hannula, Henri; Savolainen, Petri; Weiss, Carolin Lucas; Seidel, Kathleen; Laakso, Aki; Islam, Mominul; Vaalto, Selja; Lehtinen, Henri; Vitikainen, Anne-Mari; Tarapore, Phiroz E.; Picht, Thomas (2017)
    Navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (nTMS) is increasingly used for preoperative mapping of motor function, and clinical evidence for its benefit for brain tumor patients is accumulating. In respect to language mapping with repetitive nTMS, literature reports have yielded variable results, and it is currently not routinely performed for presurgical language localization. The aim of this project is to define a common protocol for nTMS motor and language mapping to standardize its neurosurgical application and increase its clinical value. The nTMS workshop group, consisting of highly experienced nTMS users with experience of more than 1500 preoperative nTMS examinations, met in Helsinki in January 2016 for thorough discussions of current evidence and personal experiences with the goal to recommend a standardized protocol for neurosurgical applications. nTMS motor mapping is a reliable and clinically validated tool to identify functional areas belonging to both normal and lesioned primary motor cortex. In contrast, this is less clear for language-eloquent cortical areas identified by nTMS. The user group agreed on a core protocol, which enables comparison of results between centers and has an excellent safety profile. Recommendations for nTMS motor and language mapping protocols and their optimal clinical integration are presented here. At present, the expert panel recommends nTMS motor mapping in routine neurosurgical practice, as it has a sufficient level of evidence supporting its reliability. The panel recommends that nTMS language mapping be used in the framework of clinical studies to continue refinement of its protocol and increase reliability.
  • Hernandez-Pavon, Julio C.; Sarvas, Jukka; Ilmoniemi, Risto J. (American Institute of Physics, 2014)
    AIP Conference Proceedings
    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) combined with electroencephalography (EEG) is a powerful technique for non-invasively studying cortical excitability and connectivity. The combination of TMS and EEG has widely been used to perform basic research and recently has gained importance in different clinical applications. In this paper, we will describe the physical and biological principles of TMS-EEG and different applications in basic research and clinical applications. We will present methods based on independent component analysis (ICA) for studying the TMS-evoked EEG responses. These methods have the capability to remove and suppress large artifacts, making it feasible, for instance, to study language areas with TMS-EEG. We will discuss the different applications and limitations of TMS and TMS-EEG in clinical applications. Potential applications of TMS are presented, for instance in neurosurgical planning, depression and other neurological disorders. Advantages and disadvantages of TMS-EEG and its variants such as repetitive TMS (rTMS) are discussed in comparison to other brain stimulation and neuroimaging techniques. Finally, challenges that researchers face when using this technique will be summarized.