Browsing by Subject "BREAST-CANCER"

Sort by: Order: Results:

Now showing items 1-20 of 114
  • Harma, Ville; Virtanen, Johannes; Mäkelä, Rami; Happonen, Antti; Mpindi, John-Patrick; Knuuttila, Matias; Kohonen, Pekka; Lötjönen, Jyrki; Kallioniemi, Olli; Nees, Matthias (2010)
  • Kashani-Sabet, Mohammed; Sagebiel, Richard W.; Joensuu, Heikki; Miller, James R. (2013)
  • Moyano-Galceran, Lidia; Pietila, Elina A.; Turunen, S. Pauliina; Corvigno, Sara; Hjerpe, Elisabet; Bulanova, Daria; Joneborg, Ulrika; Alkasalias, Twana; Miki, Yuichiro; Yashiro, Masakazu; Chernenko, Anastasiya; Jukonen, Joonas; Singh, Madhurendra; Dahlstrand, Hanna; Carlson, Joseph W.; Lehti, Kaisa (2020)
    Metastatic cancers commonly activate adaptive chemotherapy resistance, attributed to both microenvironment-dependent phenotypic plasticity and genetic characteristics of cancer cells. However, the contribution of chemotherapy itself to the non-genetic resistance mechanisms was long neglected. Using high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSC) patient material and cell lines, we describe here an unexpectedly robust cisplatin and carboplatin chemotherapy-induced ERK1/2-RSK1/2-EphA2-GPRC5A signaling switch associated with cancer cell intrinsic and acquired chemoresistance. Mechanistically, pharmacological inhibition or knockdown of RSK1/2 prevented oncogenic EphA2-S897 phosphorylation and EphA2-GPRC5A co-regulation, thereby facilitating a signaling shift to the canonical tumor-suppressive tyrosine phosphorylation and consequent downregulation of EphA2. In combination with platinum, RSK inhibitors effectively sensitized even the most platinum-resistant EphA2(high), GPRC5A(high) cells to the therapy-induced apoptosis. In HGSC patient tumors, this orphan receptor GPRC5A was expressed exclusively in cancer cells and associated with chemotherapy resistance and poor survival. Our results reveal a kinase signaling pathway uniquely activated by platinum to elicit adaptive resistance. They further identify GPRC5A as a marker for abysmal HGSC outcome and putative vulnerability of the chemo-resistant cells to RSK1/2-EphA2-pS897 pathway inhibition.
  • Kangas, Reeta; Tormakangas, Timo; Fey, Vidal; Pursiheimo, Juha; Miinalainen, Ilkka; Alen, Markku; Kaprio, Jaakko; Sipila, Sarianna; Saamanen, Anna-Marja; Kovanen, Vuokko; Laakkonen, Eija K. (2017)
    Exosomes participate in intercellular messaging by transporting bioactive lipid-, protein-and RNA-molecules and -complexes. The contents of the exosomes reflect the physiological status of an individual making exosomes promising targets for biomarker analyses. In the present study we extracted exosome microRNAs (exomiRs) from serum samples of premenopausal women (n = 8) and monozygotic postmenopausal twins (n = 10 female pairs), discordant for the use of estrogenic hormone replacement therapy (HRT), in order to see whether the age or/and the use of HRT associates with exomiR content. A total of 241 exomiRs were detected by next generation sequencing, 10 showing age, 14 HRT and 10 age + HRT-related differences. When comparing the groups, differentially expressed miRs were predicted to affect cell proliferation processes showing inactivation with younger age and HRT usage. MiR-106-5p, -148a-3p, -27-3p, -126-5p, -28-3p and -30a-5p were significantly associated with serum 17 beta-estradiol. MiRs formed two hierarchical clusters being indicative of positive or negative health outcomes involving associations with body composition, serum 17 beta-estradiol, fat-, glucose-and inflammatory markers. Circulating exomiR clusters, obtained by NGS, could be used as indicators of metabolic and inflammatory status affected by hormonal changes at menopause. Furthermore, the individual effects of HRT-usage could be evaluated based on the serum exomiR signature.
  • PanScan PanC4 consortia; Walsh, Naomi; Zhang, Han; Männistö, Satu; Weiderpass, Elisabete (2019)
    Background Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) identify associations of individual single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with cancer risk but usually only explain a fraction of the inherited variability. Pathway analysis of genetic variants is a powerful tool to identify networks of susceptibility genes. Methods We conducted a large agnostic pathway-based meta-analysis of GWAS data using the summary-based adaptive rank truncated product method to identify gene sets and pathways associated with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) in 9040 cases and 12 496 controls. We performed expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) analysis and functional annotation of the top SNPs in genes contributing to the top associated pathways and gene sets. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results We identified 14 pathways and gene sets associated with PDAC at a false discovery rate of less than 0.05. After Bonferroni correction (P Conclusion Our agnostic pathway and gene set analysis integrated with functional annotation and eQTL analysis provides insight into genes and pathways that may be biologically relevant for risk of PDAC, including those not previously identified.
  • Hautala, Laura C.; Pang, Poh-Choo; Antonopoulos, Aristotelis; Pasanen, Annukka; Lee, Cheuk-Lun; Chiu, Philip C. N.; Yeung, William S. B.; Loukovaara, Mikko; Bützow, Ralf; Haslam, Stuart M.; Dell, Anne; Koistinen, Hannu (2020)
    Glycodelin is a major glycoprotein expressed in reproductive tissues, like secretory and decidualized endometrium. It has several reproduction related functions that are dependent on specific glycosylation, but it has also been found to drive differentiation of endometrial carcinoma cells toward a less malignant phenotype. Here we aimed to elucidate whether the glycosylation and function of glycodelin is altered in endometrial carcinoma as compared with a normal endometrium. We carried out glycan structure analysis of glycodelin expressed in HEC-1B human endometrial carcinoma cells (HEC-1B Gd) by mass spectrometry glycomics strategies. Glycans of HEC-1B Gd were found to comprise a typical mixture of high-mannose, hybrid, and complex-type N-glycans, often containing undecorated LacNAc (Gal beta 1-4GlcNAc) antennae. However, several differences, as compared with previously reported glycan structures of normal human decidualized endometrium-derived glycodelin isoform, glycodelin-A (GdA), were also found. These included a lower level of sialylation and more abundant poly-LacNAc antennae, some of which are fucosylated. This allowed us to select lectins that showed different binding to these classes of glycodelin. Despite the differences in glycosylation between HEC-1B Gd and GdA, both showed similar inhibitory activity on trophoblast cell invasion and peripheral blood mononuclear cell proliferation. For the detection of cancer associated glycodelin, we established a novel in situ proximity-ligation based histochemical staining method using a specific glycodelin antibody and UEAI lectin. We found that the UEAI reactive glycodelin was abundant in endometrial carcinoma, but virtually absent in normal endometrial tissue even when glycodelin was strongly expressed. In conclusion, we established a histochemical staining method for the detection of endometrial carcinoma-associated glycodelin and showed that this specific glycodelin is exclusively expressed in cancer, not in normal endometrium. Similar methods can be used for studies of other glycoproteins. Glycodelin is a major endometrial glycoprotein. The authors analyzed glycan structures of endometrial carcinoma associated glycodelin and established a novel glycodelin-glycoform specific histochemical staining method. With this, they showed that glycodelin is differentially glycosylated in endometrial carcinoma tissue, as compared to normal endometrium, representing a neoantigen with potential clinical applications.
  • Liu, Xingzhi; Zhang, Hongbo; Cheng, Ruoyu; Gu, Yanzheng; Yin, Yin; Sun, Zhiyong; Pan, Guoqing; Deng, Zhongbin; Yang, Huilin; Deng, Lianfu; Cui, Wenguo; Almeida Santos, Helder; Shi, Qin (2018)
    Antibody-based cancer immune therapy has attracted lots of research interest in recent years; however, it is greatly limited by the easy distribution and burst release of antibodies. In addition, after the clearance of the tissue, healthy tissue regeneration is another challenge for cancer treatment. Herein, we have developed a specific immunological tissue engineering scaffold using the agonistic mouse anti-human CD40 antibody (CD40mAb) incorporated into poly(l-lactide) (PLLA) electrospun fibers through the dopamine (PDA) motif (PLLA-PDA-CD40mAb). CD40mAb is successfully incorporated onto the surface of the electrospun fibrous scaffold, which is proved by immunofluorescence staining, and the PLLA-PDA-CD40mAb scaffold has an anti-tumor effect by locally releasing CD40mAb. Therefore, this immunological electrospun scaffold has very good potential to be developed as a powerful tool for localized tumor treatment, and this is the first to be reported in this area.
  • Gousopoulos, Epameinondas; Proulx, Steven T.; Bachmann, Samia B.; Dieterich, Lothar C.; Scholl, Jeannette; Karaman, Sinem; Bianchi, Roberta; Detmar, Michael (2017)
    Secondary lymphedema is a common complication after cancer treatment, but the pathomechanisms underlying the disease remain unclear. Using a mouse tail lymphedema model, we found an increase in local and systemic levels of the lymphangiogenic factor vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-C and identified CD68(+) macrophages as a cellular source. Surprisingly, overexpression of VEGF-C in a transgenic mouse model led to aggravation of lymphedema with increased immune cell infiltration and vascular leakage compared with wild-type littermates. Conversely, blockage of VEGF-C by overexpression of soluble VEGF receptor-3 reduced edema development, diminishing inflammation and blood vascular leakage. Similar findings were obtained in a hind limb lymph node excision lymphedema model. Flow cytometry analyses and immunofluorescence stainings in lymphedematic tissue showed that VEGF receptor-3 expression was restricted to lymphatic endothelial cells. Our data suggest that endogenous VEGF-C causes blood vascular leakage and fluid influx into the tissue, thus actively contributing to edema formation. These data may provide the basis for future clinical therapeutic approaches.
  • Theelen, Thomas L.; Lappalainen, Jari P.; Sluimer, Judith C.; Gurzeler, Erika; Cleutjens, Jack P.; Gijbels, Marion J.; Biessen, Erik A. L.; Daemen, Mat J. A. P.; Alitalo, Kari; Yla-Herttuala, Seppo (2015)
    Objective: Angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2) blocking agents are currently undergoing clinical trials for use in cancer treatment. Ang-2 has also been associated with rupture-prone atherosclerotic plaques in humans, suggesting a role for Ang-2 in plaque stability. Despite the availability of Ang-2 blocking agents, their clinical use is still lacking. Our aim was to establish if Ang-2 has a role in atheroma development and in the transition of subclinical to clinically relevant atherosclerosis. We investigated the effect of antibody-mediated Ang-2 blockage on atherogenesis after in a mouse model of atherosclerosis. Methods: Hypercholesterolemic (low-density lipoprotein receptor(-/-) apolipoprotein B-100/100) mice were subjected to high-cholesterol diet for eight weeks, one group with and one group without Ang-2 blocking antibody treatment during weeks 4-8. To enhance plaque development, a peri-adventitial collar was placed around the carotid arteries at the start of antibody treatment. Aortic root, carotid arteries and brachiocephalic arteries were analyzed to evaluate the effect of Ang-2 blockage on atherosclerotic plaque size and stable plaque characteristics. Results: Anti-Ang-2 treatment reduced the size of fatty streaks in the brachiocephalic artery (-72%, p <0.05). In addition, antibody-mediated Ang-2 blockage reduced plasma triglycerides (-27%, p <0.05). In contrast, Ang-2 blockage did not have any effect on the size or composition (collagen content, macrophage percentage, adventitial microvessel density) of pre-existing plaques in the aortic root or collar-induced plaques in the carotid artery. Conclusions: Ang-2 blockage was beneficial as it decreased fatty streak formation and plasma triglyceride levels, but had no adverse effect on pre-existing atherosclerosis in hypercholesterolemic mice. (C) 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.
  • Guo, Hui; Liu, Dongmei; Gao, Bin; Zhang, Xiaohui; You, Minli; Ren, Hui; Zhang, Hongbo; Almeida Santos, Helder; Xu, Feng (2016)
    Evodiamine (EVO) and rutaecarpine (RUT) are promising anti-tumor drug candidates. The evaluation of the anti-proliferative activity and cellular uptake of EVO and RUT in 3D multicellular spheroids of cancer cells would better recapitulate the native situation and thus better reflect an in vivo response to the treatment. Herein, we employed the 3D culture of MCF-7 and SMMC-7721 cells based on hanging drop method and evaluated the anti-proliferative activity and cellular uptake of EVO and RUT in 3D multicellular spheroids, and compared the results with those obtained from 2D monolayers. The drugs’ IC50 values were significantly increased from the range of 6.4–44.1 μM in 2D monolayers to 21.8–138.0 μM in 3D multicellular spheroids, which may be due to enhanced mass barrier and reduced drug penetration in 3D models. The fluorescence of EVO and RUT was measured via fluorescence spectroscopy and the cellular uptake of both drugs was characterized in 2D tumor models. The results showed that the cellular uptake concentrations of RUT increased with increasing drug concentrations. However, the EVO concentrations uptaken by the cells showed only a small change with increasing drug concentrations, which may be due to the different solubility of EVO and Rut in solvents. Overall, this study provided a new vision of the anti-tumor activity of EVO and RUT via 3D multicellular spheroids and cellular uptake through the fluorescence of compounds.
  • Utz, Begüm; Turpin, Rita; Lampe, Johanna; Pouwels, Jeroen; Klefström, Juha (2020)
    Breast cancer is the most common form of cancer in women. Despite significant therapeutic advances in recent years, breast cancer also still causes the greatest number of cancer-related deaths in women, the vast majority of which (>90%) are caused by metastases. However, very few mouse mammary cancer models exist that faithfully recapitulate the multistep metastatic process in human patients. Here we assessed the suitability of a syngrafting protocol for a Myc-driven mammary tumor model (WAP-Myc) to study autochthonous metastasis. A moderate but robust spontaneous lung metastasis rate of around 25% was attained. In addition, increased T cell infiltration was observed in metastatic tumors compared to donor and syngrafted primary tumors. Thus, the WAP-Myc syngrafting protocol is a suitable tool to study the mechanisms of metastasis in MYC-driven breast cancer.
  • Patel, V.L.; Busch, E.L.; Friebel, T.M.; Cronin, A.; Leslie, G.; McGuffog, L.; Adlard, J.; Agata, S.; Agnarsson, B.A.; Ahmed, M.; Aittomäki, K.; Alducci, E.; Andrulis, I.L.; Arason, A.; Arnold, N.; Artioli, G.; Arver, B.; Auber, B.; Azzollini, J.; Balmaña, J.; Barkardottir, R.B.; Barnes, D.R.; Barroso, A.; Barrowdale, D.; Belotti, M.; Benitez, J.; Bertelsen, B.; Blok, M.J.; Bodrogi, I.; Bonadona, V.; Bonanni, B.; Bondavalli, D.; Boonen, S.E.; Borde, J.; Borg, A.; Bradbury, A.R.; Brady, A.; Brewer, C.; Brunet, J.; Buecher, B.; Buys, S.S.; Cabezas-Camarero, S.; Caldes, T.; Caliebe, A.; Caligo, M.A.; Calvello, M.; Campbell, I.G.; Carnevali, I.; Carrasco, E.; Chan, T.L.; Chu, A.T.W.; Chung, W.K.; Claes, K.B.M.; Cook, J.; Cortesi, L.; Couch, F.J.; Daly, M.B.; Damante, G.; Darder, E.; Davidson, R.; De La Hoya, M.; Della Puppa, L.; Dennis, J.; Díez, O.; Ding, Y.C.; Ditsch, N.; Domchek, S.M.; Donaldson, A.; Dworniczak, B.; Easton, D.F.; Eccles, D.M.; Eeles, R.A.; Ehrencrona, H.; Ejlertsen, B.; Engel, C.; Evans, D.G.; Faivre, L.; Faust, U.; Feliubadalo, L.; Foretova, L.; Fostira, F.; Fountzilas, G.; Frost, D.; García-Barberan, V.; Garre, P.; Gauthier-Villars, M.; Geczi, L.; Gehrig, A.; Gerdes, A.-M.; Gesta, P.; Giannini, G.; Glendon, G.; Godwin, A.K.; Goldgar, D.E.; Greene, M.H.; Gutierrez-Barrera, A.M.; Hahnen, E.; Hamann, U.; Hauke, J.; Herold, N.; Hogervorst, F.B.L.; Honisch, E.; Hopper, J.L.; Hulick, P.J.; Izatt, L.; Jager, A.; James, P.; Janavicius, R.; Jensen, U.B.; Jensen, T.D.; Johannsson, O.Th.; John, E.M.; Joseph, V.; Kang, E.; Kast, K.; Kiiski, J.I.; Kim, S.-W.; Kim, Z.; Ko, K.-P.; Konstantopoulou, I.; Kramer, G.; Krogh, L.; Kruse, T.A.; Kwong, A.; Larsen, M.; Lasset, C.; Lautrup, C.; Lazaro, C.; Lee, J.; Lee, J.W.; Lee, M.H.; Lemke, J.; Lesueur, F.; Liljegren, A.; Lindblom, A.; Llovet, P.; Lopez-Fernandez, A.; Lopez-Perolio, I.; Lorca, V.; Loud, J.T.; Ma, E.S.K.; Mai, P.L.; Manoukian, S.; Mari, V.; Martin, L.; Matricardi, L.; Mebirouk, N.; Medici, V.; Meijers-Heijboer, H.E.J.; Meindl, A.; Mensenkamp, A.R.; Miller, C.; Gomes, D.M.; Montagna, M.; Mooij, T.M.; Moserle, L.; Mouret-Fourme, E.; Mulligan, A.M.; Nathanson, K.L.; Navratilova, M.; Nevanlinna, H.; Niederacher, D.; Cilius Nielsen, F.C.; Nikitina-Zake, L.; Offit, K.; Olah, E.; Olopade, O.I.; Ong, K.-R.; Osorio, A.; Ott, C.-E.; Palli, D.; Park, S.K.; Parsons, M.T.; Pedersen, I.S.; Peissel, B.; Peixoto, A.; Perez-Segura, P.; Peterlongo, P.; Petersen, A.H.; Porteous, M.E.; Pujana, M.A.; Radice, P.; Ramser, J.; Rantala, J.; Rashid, M.U.; Rhiem, K.; Rizzolo, P.; Robson, M.E.; Rookus, M.A.; Rossing, C.M.; Ruddy, K.J.; Santos, C.; Saule, C.; Scarpitta, R.; Schmutzler, R.K.; Schuster, H.; Senter, L.; Seynaeve, C.M.; Shah, P.D.; Sharma, P.; Shin, V.Y.; Silvestri, V.; Simard, J.; Singer, C.F.; Skytte, A.-B.; Snape, K.; Solano, A.R.; Soucy, P.; Southey, M.C.; Spurdle, A.B.; Steele, L.; Steinemann, D.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, D.; Stradella, A.; Sunde, L.; Sutter, C.; Tan, Y.Y.; Teixeira, M.R.; Teo, S.H.; Thomassen, M.; Tibiletti, M.G.; Tischkowitz, M.; Tognazzo, S.; Toland, A.E.; Tommasi, S.; Torres, D.; Toss, A.; Trainer, A.H.; Tung, N.; Van Asperen, C.J.; Van Der Baan, F.H.; Van Der Kolk, L.E.; Van Der Luijt, R.B.; Van Hest, L.P.; Varesco, L.; Varon-Mateeva, R.; Viel, A.; Vierstrate, J.; Villa, R.; Von Wachenfeldt, A.; Wagner, P.; Wang-Gohrke, S.; Wappenschmidt, B.; Weitzel, J.N.; Wieme, G.; Yadav, S.; Yannoukakos, D.; Yoon, S.-Y.; Zanzottera, C.; Zorn, K.K.; D’Amico, A.V.; Freedman, M.L.; Pomerantz, M.M.; Chenevix-Trench, G.; Antoniou, A.C.; Neuhausen, S.L.; Ottini, L.; Nielsen, H.R.; Rebbeck, T.R. (2020)
    Pathogenic sequence variants (PSV) in BRCA1 or BRCA2 (BRCA1/2) are associated with increased risk and severity of prostate cancer. Weevaluated whether PSVs inBRCA1/2 were associated with risk of overall prostate cancer or high grade (Gleason 8+) prostate cancer using an international sample of 65 BRCA1 and 171 BRCA2 male PSV carriers with prostate cancer, and 3,388 BRCA1 and 2,880 BRCA2 male PSV carriers without prostate cancer. PSVs in the 30 region of BRCA2 (c.7914+) were significantly associated with elevated risk of prostate cancer compared with reference bin c.1001c.7913 [HR = 1.78; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.25-2.52; P = 0.001], as well as elevated risk of Gleason 8+ prostate cancer (HR = 3.11; 95% CI, 1.63-5.95; P = 0.001). c.756-c.1000 was also associated with elevated prostate cancer risk (HR = 2.83; 95% CI, 1.71-4.68; P = 0.00004) and elevated risk of Gleason 8+prostate cancer (HR = 4.95; 95% CI, 2.12-11.54; P = 0.0002). No genotype-phenotype associations were detected for PSVs in BRCA1. These results demonstrate that specific BRCA2 PSVs may be associated with elevated risk of developing aggressive prostate cancer. Significance: Aggressive prostate cancer risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers may vary according to the specific BRCA2 mutation inherited by the at-risk individual.
  • Mauramo, Matti; Onali, Tuulia; Wahbi, Wafa; Vasara, Jenni; Lampinen, Anniina; Mauramo, Elina; Kivimäki, Anne; Martens, Stefan; Häggman, Hely; Sutinen, Meeri; Salo, Tuula (2021)
    Previous studies indicate that bilberry with high amounts of phenolic compounds can inhibit carcinogenic processes of colorectal cancer in vitro and in vivo. However, no studies have focused on the effects of bilberry on oral cancer. In this study, we aimed to examine the effects of bilberry powder on oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cells using both in vitro and in vivo assays. The effects of 0, 1, 10, and 25 mg/mL of whole bilberry powder on the viability, proliferation, migration, and invasion of OSCC (HSC-3) cells were examined and compared with 0.01 mg/mL of cetuximab. Two oral keratinocyte cell lines served as controls. Tumor area was analyzed in zebrafish microinjected with HSC-3 cells and treated with 2.5, 10, or 25 mu g/mL of bilberry powder. Metastases in the head or tail areas were counted. Bilberry powder inhibited the viability, proliferation, migration, and invasion of HSC-3 cells (p < 0.05), which was more pronounced with higher concentrations. Cetuximab had no effect on HSC-3 cell migration or invasion. Compared to controls, the tumor area in zebrafish treated with bilberry powder (10 and 25 mu g/mL) was reduced significantly (p = 0.038 and p = 0.021, respectively), but the number of fish with metastases did not differ between groups. Based on our in vitro and in vivo experiments, we conclude that whole bilberry powder has anti-tumor effects on OSCC cells.
  • Li, Xiaolei; Wu, Zhiqiang; An, Xiaojing; Mei, Qian; Bai, Miaomiao; Hanski, Leena; Li, Xiang; Ahola, Tero; Han, Weidong (2017)
    Acquired therapeutic resistance by tumors is a substantial impediment to reducing the morbidity and mortality that are attributable to human malignancies. The mechanisms responsible for the dramatic shift between chemosensitivity and chemoresistance in colorectal carcinoma have not been defined. Here, we report that LRP16 selectively interacts and activates double-stranded RNA-dependent kinase (PKR), and also acts as scaffolds to assist the formation of a ternary complex of PKR and IKK beta, prolonging the polymers of ADP-ribose (PAR)-dependent nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappa B) transactivation caused by DNA-damaging agents and confers acquired chemoresistance. We also identified a small molecule, MRS2578, which strikingly abrogated the binding of LRP16 to PKR and IKK beta, converting LRP16 into a death molecule and forestalling colon tumorigenesis. Inclusion of MRS2578 with etoposide, versus each drug alone, exhibited synergistic antitumor cytotoxicity in xenografts. Our combinatorial approach introduces a strategy to enhance the efficacy of genotoxicity therapies for the treatment of tumors.
  • Ahonen, Marko T.; Diaconu, Iulia; Pesonen, Sari; Kanerva, Anna; Baumann, Marc; Parviainen, Suvi T.; Spiller, Brad; Cerullo, Vincenzo; Hemminki, Akseli (2010)
  • Kaapu, Kalle J.; Rantaniemi, Lauri; Talala, Kirsi; Taari, Kimmo; Tammela, Teuvo L. J.; Auvinen, Anssi; Murtola, Teemu J. (2018)
    In-vitro studies have suggested that the antiarrhythmic drug digoxin might restrain the growth of cancer cells by inhibiting Na+/K+-ATPase. We evaluated the association between cancer mortality and digoxin, sotalol and general antiarrhythmic drug use in a retrospective cohort study. The study population consists of 78,615 men originally identified for the Finnish Randomized Study of Screening for Prostate Cancer. Information on antiarrhythmic drug purchases was collected from the national prescription database. We used the Cox regression method to analyze separately overall cancer mortality and mortality from the most common types of cancer. During the median follow-up of 17.0 years after the baseline 28,936 (36.8%) men died, of these 8,889 due to cancer. 9,023 men (11.5%) had used antiarrhythmic drugs. Overall cancer mortality was elevated among antiarrhythmic drug users compared to non-users (HR 1.43, 95% CI 1.34-1.53). Similar results were observed separately for digoxin and for sotalol. However, the risk associations disappeared in long-term use and were modified by background co-morbidities. All in all, cancer mortality was elevated among antiarrhythmic drug users. This association is probably non-causal as it was related to short-term use and disappeared in long-term use. Our results do not support the anticancer effects of digoxin or any other antiarrhythmic drug.
  • Moller, Pal; Seppala, Toni T.; Bernstein, Inge; Holinski-Feder, Elke; Sala, Paulo; Evans, D. Gareth; Lindblom, Annika; Macrae, Finlay; Blanco, Ignacio; Sijmons, Rolf H.; Jeffries, Jacqueline; Vasen, Hans F. A.; Burn, John; Nakken, Sigve; Hovig, Eivind; Rodland, Einar Andreas; Tharmaratnam, Kukatharmini; Cappel, Wouter H. de Vos Tot Nederveen; Hill, James; Wijnen, Juul T.; Jenkins, Mark A.; Green, Kate; Lalloo, Fiona; Sunde, Lone; Mints, Miriam; Bertario, Lucio; Pineda, Marta; Navarro, Matilde; Morak, Monika; Renkonen-Sinisalo, Laura; Valentin, Mev Dominguez; Frayling, Ian M.; Plazzer, John-Paul; Pylvanainen, Kirsi; Genuardi, Maurizio; Mecklin, Jukka-Pekka; Moeslein, Gabriela; Sampson, Julian R.; Capella, Gabriel (2018)
    Background Most patients with path_MMR gene variants (Lynch syndrome (LS)) now survive both their first and subsequent cancers, resulting in a growing number of older patients with LS for whom limited information exists with respect to cancer risk and survival. Objective and design This observational, international, multicentre study aimed to determine prospectively observed incidences of cancers and survival in path_MMR carriers up to 75 years of age. Results 3119 patients were followed for a total of 24 475 years. Cumulative incidences at 75 years (risks) for colorectal cancer were 46%, 43% and 15% in path_MLH1, path_MSH2 and path_MSH6 carriers; for endometrial cancer 43%, 57% and 46%; for ovarian cancer 10%, 17% and 13%; for upper gastrointestinal (gastric, duodenal, bile duct or pancreatic) cancers 21%, 10% and 7%; for urinary tract cancers 8%, 25% and 11%; for prostate cancer 17%, 32% and 18%; and for brain tumours 1%, 5% and 1%, respectively. Ovarian cancer occurred mainly premenopausally. By contrast, upper gastrointestinal, urinary tract and prostate cancers occurred predominantly at older ages. Overall 5-year survival for prostate cancer was 100%, urinary bladder 93%, ureter 85%, duodenum 67%, stomach 61%, bile duct 29%, brain 22% and pancreas 0%. Path_PMS2 carriers had lower risk for cancer. Conclusion C arriers of different path_MMR variants exhibit distinct patterns of cancer risk and survival as they age. Risk estimates for counselling and planning of surveillance and treatment should be tailored to each patient's age, gender and path_MMR variant. We have updated our open-access website www. lscarisk. org to facilitate this.
  • Yang, Xin; Leslie, Goska; Doroszuk, Alicja; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Nevanlinna, Heli; Tischkowitz, Marc (2020)
    PURPOSE To estimate age-specific relative and absolute cancer risks of breast cancer and to estimate risks of ovarian, pancreatic, male breast, prostate, and colorectal cancers associated with germline PALB2 pathogenic variants (PVs) because these risks have not been extensively characterized. METHODS We analyzed data from 524 families with PALB2 PVs from 21 countries. Complex segregation analysis was used to estimate relative risks (RRs; relative to country-specific population incidences) and absolute risks of cancers. The models allowed for residual familial aggregation of breast and ovarian cancer and were adjusted for the family-specific ascertainment schemes. RESULTS We found associations between PALB2 PVs and risk of female breast cancer (RR, 7.18; 95% CI, 5.82 to 8.85; P = 6.5 x 10(-76)), ovarian cancer (RR, 2.91; 95% CI, 1.40 to 6.04; P = 4.1 x 10(-3)), pancreatic cancer (RR, 2.37; 95% CI, 1.24 to 4.50; P = 8.7 x 10(-3)), and male breast cancer (RR, 7.34; 95% CI, 1.28 to 42.18; P = 2.6 x 10(-2)). There was no evidence for increased risks of prostate or colorectal cancer. The breast cancer RRs declined with age (P for trend = 2.0 x 10(-3)). After adjusting for family ascertainment, breast cancer risk estimates on the basis of multiple case families were similar to the estimates from families ascertained through population-based studies (P for difference = .41). On the basis of the combined data, the estimated risks to age 80 years were 53% (95% CI, 44% to 63%) for female breast cancer, 5% (95% CI, 2% to 10%) for ovarian cancer, 2%-3% (95% CI females, 1% to 4%; 95% CI males, 2% to 5%) for pancreatic cancer, and 1% (95% CI, 0.2% to 5%) for male breast cancer. CONCLUSION These results confirm PALB2 as a major breast cancer susceptibility gene and establish substantial associations between germline PALB2 PVs and ovarian, pancreatic, and male breast cancers. These findings will facilitate incorporation of PALB2 into risk prediction models and optimize the clinical cancer risk management of PALB2 PV carriers. (C) 2019 by American Society of Clinical Oncology
  • Barok, Mark; Puhka, Maija; Vereb, Gyorgy; Szollosi, Janos; Isola, Jorma; Joensuu, Heikki (2018)
    Background: Trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1) is an antibody-drug conjugate that carries a cytotoxic drug (DM1) to HER2-positive cancer. The target of T-DM1 (HER2) is present also on cancer-derived exosomes. We hypothesized that exosome-bound T-DM1 may contribute to the activity of T-DM1. Methods: Exosomes were isolated from the cell culture medium of HER2-positive SKBR-3 and EFM-192A breast cancer cells, HER2-positive SNU-216 gastric cancer cells, and HER2-negative MCF-7 breast cancer cells by serial centrifugations including two ultracentrifugations, and treated with T-DM1. T-DM1 not bound to exosomes was removed using HER2-coated magnetic beads. Exosome samples were analyzed by electron microscopy, flow cytometry and Western blotting. Binding of T-DM1-containing exosomes to cancer cells and T-DM1 internalization were investigated with confocal microscopy. Effects of T-DM1-containg exosomes on cancer cells were investigated with the AlamarBlue cell proliferation assay and the Caspase-Glo 3/7 caspase activation assay. Results: T-DM1 binds to exosomes derived from HER2-positive cancer cells, but not to exosomes derived from HER2-negative MCF-7 cells. HER2-positive SKBR-3 cells accumulated T-DM1 after being treated with T-DM1-containg exosomes, and treatment of SKBR-3 and EFM-192A cells with T-DM1-containing exosomes resulted in growth inhibition and activation of caspases 3 and/or 7. Conclusion: T-DM1 binds to exosomes derived from HER2-positive cancer cells, and T-DM1 may be carried to other cancer cells via exosomes leading to reduced viability of the recipient cells. The results suggest a new mechanism of action for T-DM1, mediated by exosomes derived from HER2-positive cancer.