Browsing by Subject "Barentsin alue"

Sort by: Order: Results:

Now showing items 1-5 of 5
  • Arho, Laura (2000)
    Tämän tutkimuksen aiheena on Barentsin euroarktinen alue (BEAR) ja kansainvälinen yhteistyö alueen ydinturvallisuuden parantamiseksi. Tutkimuksen pääasiallisena tavoitteena on selvittää, mitä alueen ydinturvallisuuden parantamiseksi on tehty sekä tarkastella BEAR:a alueena ja kansainvälisen yhteistyön kenttänä. Tutkimuksen teoreettisena pohjana on käytetty uusliberelistisia teorioita - regionalismia ja funktionalismia - kuvaamaan kansainvälistä alueellista yhteistyötä. Regionalismin avulla on pyritty kuvaamaan BEAR:n luonnetta alueena sekä aluemuodostuksen kehitystä. Funktionalismi on taas tarjonnut lähtökohdan rajat ylittävän yhteistyön dynamiikan tarkasteluun. Tutkimuksen toinen teoreettinen painopiste liittyy laajaan turvallisuuskäsitteeseen. Tämän käsitteen avulla on tarkasteltu BEAR:n ydinturvallisuuteen liittyviä ongelmia, jotka luokitellaan ns. pehmeään turvallisuuteen (soft security) kuuluviksi ongelmaksi. Tutkimuksessa on todettu BEAR:n edustavan "alueellistettua" aluetta eli aluemuodostuksen lähteneen liikkeelle alueen valtioiden aloitteesta. Alueen yhteistyö on hyvin käytännönläheistä liittyen matalan politiikan (low politics) aihealueisiin. Korkeaan politiikkaan (high politics) liittyvät turvallisuusasiat on jätetty yhteistyön ulkopuolelle. Pehmeään turvallisuuteen liittyvät ympäristö- ja ydinturvallisuusongelmat, ovat nousseet yhdeksi keskeiseksi yhteistyön kohteeksi alueella. Ydinturvallisuuteen liittyvät ongelmat ovat alueella suurelta osin sotilaallisen läsnäolon aiheuttamia. Projektiluontoinen yhteistyö sotilastukikohdissa ydinturvallisuuden parantamiseksi onkin lähentänyt pehmeää turvallisuutta ja perinteistä sotilaallista turvallisuutta toisiinsa.
  • Juvonen, Sanna-Kaisa; Kuhmonen, Anna (Suomen ympäristökeskus, 2013)
    Reports of the Finnish Environment Institute 37/2013
    In this report, results of a regional evaluation on protected areas in the Barents Region are presented. The evaluation was made using the Programme of Work on Protected Areas (PoWPA) of the Convention on Biological Diversity as a framework. The Convention on Biological Diversity aims to halt the loss of biodiversity by 2020. The work was done as a part of the Barents Protected Area Network (BPAN) project by national and regional authorities, scientific institutes and nature conservation nongovernmental organisations from Norway, Sweden, Finland and northwest Russia. The aim of the project is to promote the establishment of a representative protected area network in the Barents Euro-Arctic Region to conserve biodiversity of boreal and arctic nature, particularly forests and wetlands. The PoWPA national reporting framework was modified and simplified to make it more suitable to be used as a tool for analysis of the protected area network in the Barents Region. It was used especially to see in which PoWPA goals and targets the Barents Region as a whole had made progress, and in which there was need for further work, and thus make recommendations for future actions in the Region. This enabled also the individual regions to assess in which goals and targets their region had made progress and in which there was need for further development. The reporting framework also provided a common language for interregional discussions and comparisons. A network of existing and planned protected areas is under development in the Barents Region. New protected areas have been established in recent years. However, strong efforts are still needed for strengthening the network of protected areas in order to reach the internationally agreed Aichi Biodiversity Targets.
  • Kuhmonen, Anna; Mikkola, Jyri; Storrank, Bo; Lindholm, Tapio (Finnish Environment Institute, 2017)
    Reports of the Finnish Environment Institute 33/2017
    The project Barents Protected Area Network (BPAN) produced an overview of the characteristics and representativeness of the protected area network in the Barents Region in 2011-2014. A second phase was launched in 2015, and included studies on high conservation value forests (HCVFs) and coastal areas. The main aim of the project on forests was to produce new information on the distribution and protection status of HCVFs in a study area including the Barents Euro-Arctic regions of northwest Russia, Finland and Sweden. Furthermore, the aim of the project was to deliver updates on the protected area coverage in the study area, and to relate the progress of establishing protected areas to the Aichi Biodiversity Targets of the Convention on Biological Diversity, and especially Target 11. In this study, a project-specific concept of high conservation value forests was applied in order to identify, describe and visualize the distribution of forests that are especially important for biodiversity. In Sweden and Finland, HCVFs were identified on the basis of existing data gained in field inventories. Remote sensing data, data from national forest inventories as well as studies of aerial photographs provided additional information. In northwest Russia, due to the vast areas covered by forests, mainly remote sensing was used. Data on land cover, and in particular regarding HCVFs and protected areas, was analyzed and displayed on maps using geographical information systems. A total of close to 325 000 km² were identified as verified or potential HCVFs. In Sweden, HCVFs covered about one fourth of the forested area of the study area, whereas the share was a bit higher in Finland (29%) and considerably higher in Russia (37%). The biggest share of HCVFs was detected in spruce-dominated coniferous forests; about 60% of these forests were classified as HCVFs. By the end of 2015, the protected areas covered almost 200 000 km² or 12,7% of the study area. The protected area coverage as compared to the situation two years earlier has improved, but in this rather short period of time the progress has naturally been rather modest. The biggest change has occurred in Russia. In most of the administrative regions of the Barents Euro-Arctic Region the objective of protecting 17% of terrestrial areas and inland waters by 2020 - according to the Aichi Target 11 - has not yet been reached. A more thorough analysis of the protection level of the main types of forests of the Barents Region was carried out. The forests were divided into coniferous forests (pine-dominated coniferous forests on mineral land, pine-dominated coniferous forests on peatland, spruce-dominated forests), mixed forests and deciduous forests. Comprehensive maps and overviews of these forests were produced, presenting the distribution, total area, the proportional share of these types of forests as well as the level of protection. Statistics were produced for the whole study area, by country and region. In the whole Barents Region (excluding Norway) 11,7% of the forests were protected by the end of 2015. The project results and especially the data on high conservation value forests could be used in the development of the protected area systems of the region. The project has also highlighted the need to enhance the ecological connectivity between protected areas, and the data compiled by the project could provide a starting point for further development of connectivity analyses on different geographical scales. Furthermore, the project results could be used in order to facilitate an increased stakeholder dialogue regarding sustainable management of forest resources in the Barents Region.
  • Aksenov, Dmitry; Kuhmonen, Anna; Mikkola, Jyri; Sobolev, Nikolay (Finnish Environment Institute, 2015)
    Reports of the Finnish Environment Institute 29/2014
    This report presents the results of an analysis of the characteristics and representativeness of the protected area network in the Barents Region based on a large amount of GIS data. The report evaluates the current state of the protected area network in comparison with the global Aichi Biodiversity Targets of the Convention on Biological Diversity that aim to halt the loss of biodiversity by 2020 (2010, Nagoya, Japan). Target 11 states that by 2020 at least 17% of terrestrial and inland water areas are conserved through effectively and equitably managed, ecologically representative and well-connected systems of protected areas. This work was done as a part of the Barents Protected Area Network (BPAN) project by national and regional authorities, scientific institutes and nature conservation non-governmental organizations from Norway, Sweden, Finland and northwest Russia. The aim of the BPAN project is to promote the establishment of a representative protected area network in the Barents Euro-Arctic Region to conserve biodiversity of boreal and Arctic nature, particularly forests and wetlands. This report provides for the first time unified and harmonized information on protected areas across national and regional borders covering 13 administrative regions in the four countries, providing a common language to discuss different kinds of protected areas. The information is presented in comprehensive forms as thematic maps, tables and figures. This information is now available to be utilized in nature conservation planning in each participating country, taking into account the trans-boundary connectivity of protected areas. A network of existing and planned protected areas is under constant development in the Barents Region. In March 2013, protected areas covered 13,2% (231 600 km2) of the Barents Region, and national and regional nature conservation plans included establishing a further 59 400 km2 as protected areas, increasing the future level of protection to cover 16,6% of the terrestrial area. In developing protected area networks, the representativeness of forests and wetlands and the connectivity of the protected areas need special emphasis.
  • Juvonen, Sanna-Kaisa; Kuhmonen, Anna (Finnish Environment Institute, 2015)
    Доклады Института Окружающей Среды Финляндии 37py/2013 - Reports of the Finnish Environment Institute 37ru/2013
    В отчете представлены результаты оценки состояния системы особо охраняемых природных территорий (ООПТ) в странах, областях и автономных республиках, входящих в Баренцев Евро-Арктический регион. В качестве инструмента были использованы четыре элемента Программы работы с ООПТ (PoWPA) в составе Конвенции о Биологическом разнообразии (КБР), цель которой – остановить процесс утраты биологического разнообразия к 2020 году. Работа являлась составной частью проекта «Сеть ООПТ Баренц-региона» (BPAN), в котором принимали участие представители правительств, региональных администраций, научно-исследовательских институтов и негосударственных природоохранных организаций Норвегии, Швеции, Финляндии и Северо-Запада России. Цель проекта – способствовать созданию репрезентативной сети ООПТ Баренц-региона, чтобы сохранить биоразнообразие таежной и арктической природы, в первую очередь лесов и водно-болотных угодий. Схема отчетов по оценке работы по программе PoWPA была упрощена и модифицирована для того, чтобы сделать ее практически выполнимой для оценки состояния систем ООПТ в каждой стране, области или республике, входящей в Баренц-регион. Она позволила выяснить, в каких аспектах работы был достигнут прогресс, и какие аспекты нуждаются в доработке. Это послужило основой для подготовки рекомендаций для дальнейших действий по укреплению системы ООПТ в Баренц-регионе в целом. Был выработан общий язык при обсуждении и сравнении систем ООПТ между отдельными регионами, и в каждом их них смогли оценить достижения и недостатки своих систем ООПТ в сравнении с соседними. Система существующих и планируемых к созданию в Баренц-регионе ООПТ находится в состоянии развития. В течение последних лет были созданы несколько новых ООПТ. Вместе с тем, для достижения задач КБР по сохранению биоразнообразия, сформулированных в Айчи, требуются дальнейшие усилия по укреплению системы ООПТ. In this report, results of a regional evaluation on protected areas in the Barents Region are presented. The evaluation was made using the Programme of Work on Protected Areas (PoWPA) of the Convention on Biological Diversity as a framework. The Convention on Biological Diversity aims to halt the loss of biodiversity by 2020. The work was done as a part of the Barents Protected Area Network (BPAN) project by national and regional authorities, scientific institutes and nature conservation nongovernmental organisations from Norway, Sweden, Finland and northwest Russia. The aim of the project is to promote the establishment of a representative protected area network in the Barents Euro-Arctic Region to conserve biodiversity of boreal and arctic nature, particularly forests and wetlands. The PoWPA national reporting framework was modified and simplified to make it more suitable to be used as a tool for analysis of the protected area network in the Barents Region. It was used especially to see in which PoWPA goals and targets the Barents Region as a whole had made progress, and in which there was need for further work, and thus make recommendations for future actions in the Region. This enabled also the individual regions to assess in which goals and targets their region had made progress and in which there was need for further development. The reporting framework also provided a common language for interregional discussions and comparisons. A network of existing and planned protected areas is under development in the Barents Region. New protected areas have been established in recent years. However, strong efforts are still needed for strengthening the network of protected areas in order to reach the internationally agreed Aichi Biodiversity Targets.