Browsing by Subject "Bifidobacteria"

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  • Korpela, K.; Zijlmans, M. A C; Kuitunen, M.; Kukkonen, K.; Savilahti, E.; Salonen, A.; de Weerth, C.; de Vos, W. M (BioMed Central, 2017)
    Abstract Background Children with high body mass index (BMI) at preschool age are at risk of developing obesity. Early identification of factors that increase the risk of excessive weight gain could help direct preventive actions. The intestinal microbiota and antibiotic use have been identified as potential modulators of early metabolic programming and weight development. To test if the early microbiota composition is associated with later BMI, and if antibiotic use modifies this association, we analysed the faecal microbiota composition at 3 months and the BMI at 5–6 years in two cohorts of healthy children born vaginally at term in the Netherlands (N = 87) and Finland (N = 75). We obtained lifetime antibiotic use records and measured weight and height of all children. Results The relative abundance of streptococci was positively and the relative abundance of bifidobacteria negatively associated with the BMI outcome. The association was especially strong among children with a history of antibiotic use. Bacteroides relative abundance was associated with BMI only in the children with minimal lifetime antibiotic exposure. Conclusions The intestinal microbiota of infants are predictive of later BMI and may serve as an early indicator of obesity risk. Bifidobacteria and streptococci, which are indicators of microbiota maturation in infants, are likely candidates for metabolic programming of infants, and their influence on BMI appears to depend on later antibiotic use.
  • Korpela, K.; Zijlmans, M. A. C.; Kuitunen, M.; Kukkonen, K.; Savilahti, E.; Salonen, Anne; de Weerth, C.; de Vos, W. M. (2017)
    Background: Children with high body mass index (BMI) at preschool age are at risk of developing obesity. Early identification of factors that increase the risk of excessive weight gain could help direct preventive actions. The intestinal microbiota and antibiotic use have been identified as potential modulators of early metabolic programming and weight development. To test if the early microbiota composition is associated with later BMI, and if antibiotic use modifies this association, we analysed the faecal microbiota composition at 3 months and the BMI at 5-6 years in two cohorts of healthy children born vaginally at term in the Netherlands (N = 87) and Finland (N = 75). We obtained lifetime antibiotic use records and measured weight and height of all children. Results: The relative abundance of streptococci was positively and the relative abundance of bifidobacteria negatively associated with the BMI outcome. The association was especially strong among children with a history of antibiotic use. Bacteroides relative abundance was associated with BMI only in the children with minimal lifetime antibiotic exposure. Conclusions: The intestinal microbiota of infants are predictive of later BMI and may serve as an early indicator of obesity risk. Bifidobacteria and streptococci, which are indicators of microbiota maturation in infants, are likely candidates for metabolic programming of infants, and their influence on BMI appears to depend on later a\ntibiotic use.
  • Ronkainen, Aki (Helsingin yliopisto, 2019)
    Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is a medical treatment procedure in which feces of a healthy donor are transplanted into a recipient in order to re-establish a healthy gut microbiota. Currently, FMT is used routinely to treat recurrent Clostridioides difficile infections, but it is being studied as a potential treatment for other diseases also resulting from a disbalance in the gut microbiota. FMT provides an excellent platform for studies addressing the determinants of a healthy gut microbiota, as it makes it possible to survey specific microbes involved in the process of re-establishment. In this sense, one particularly interesting group of gut microbes is the bifidobacteria. Although usually associated with commercial probiotics, bifidobacteria are actually one of first major colonizers of the human gut after birth, and they play a key role in the establishment and maintenance of a healthy gut microbiota. The aim of this study was to assess the long-term colonization of donor-derived bifidobacteria in recipients of FMT by using a combination of a culture-dependent method and molecular typing of strains. The culture-dependent method was used for the isolation of bifidobacterial strains from fecal samples of donors and recipients, whereas the molecular typing methods (rep-PCR and whole genome sequencing) were employed to differentiate the isolated strains. This study was based on the premise that in order to be of donor-origin, a bifidobacterial strain must occur in the recipient only after FMT and show close genetic relatedness to a strain isolated from the respective donor. Furthermore, in order to exhibit long-term colonization, a donor-derived strain must be present at later time points of the study’s follow-up period. The results showed that all the recipients had acquired some donor-like bifidobacteria after FMT. In addition, certain donor-derived strains of Bifidobacterium longum had persisted in some recipients throughout the follow-up period, indicating their successful colonization. This finding is of special interest, as extraneous bifidobacteria, such as probiotics, are typically lost without their continuous influx. Additionally, long-term colonization of bifidobacteria has not previously been documented in adults by a culture-dependent method. As efficient colonizers, the strains isolated in this study represent potential candidates for therapeutic agents.
  • Korpela, Katri; Salonen, Anne; Vepsäläinen, Outi; Suomalainen, Marjo; Kolmeder, Carolin; Varjosalo, Markku; Miettinen, Sini; Kukkonen, Kaarina; Savilahti, Erkki; Kuitunen, Mikael; de Vos, Willem M (BioMed Central, 2018)
    Abstract Background Infants born by caesarean section or receiving antibiotics are at increased risk of developing metabolic, inflammatory and immunological diseases, potentially due to disruption of normal gut microbiota at a critical developmental time window. We investigated whether probiotic supplementation could ameliorate the effects of antibiotic use or caesarean birth on infant microbiota in a double blind, placebo-controlled randomized clinical trial. Mothers were given a multispecies probiotic, consisting of Bifidobacterium breve Bb99 (Bp99 2 × 108 cfu) Propionibacterium freundenreichii subsp. shermanii JS (2 × 109cfu), Lactobacillus rhamnosus Lc705 (5 × 109 cfu) and Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (5 × 109 cfu) (N = 168 breastfed and 31 formula-fed), or placebo supplement (N = 201 breastfed and 22 formula-fed) during pregnancy, and the infants were given the same supplement. Faecal samples of the infants were collected at 3 months and analyzed using taxonomic, metagenomic and metaproteomic approaches. Results The probiotic supplement had a strong overall impact on the microbiota composition, but the effect depended on the infant’s diet. Only breastfed infants showed the expected increase in bifidobacteria and reduction in Proteobacteria and Clostridia. In the placebo group, both birth mode and antibiotic use were significantly associated with altered microbiota composition and function, particularly reduced Bifidobacterium abundance. In the probiotic group, the effects of antibiotics and birth mode were either completely eliminated or reduced. Conclusions The results indicate that it is possible to correct undesired changes in microbiota composition and function caused by antibiotic treatments or caesarean birth by supplementing infants with a probiotic mixture together with at least partial breastfeeding. Trial registration clinicaltrials.gov NCT00298337 . Registered March 2, 2006.
  • Korpela, Katri; Salonen, Anne; Vepsäläinen, Outi; Suomalainen, Marjo; Kolmeder, Carolin; Varjosalo, Markku; Miettinen, Sini; Kukkonen, Kaarina; Savilahti, Erkki; Kuitunen, Mikael; de Vos, Willem M. (2018)
    BackgroundInfants born by caesarean section or receiving antibiotics are at increased risk of developing metabolic, inflammatory and immunological diseases, potentially due to disruption of normal gut microbiota at a critical developmental time window. We investigated whether probiotic supplementation could ameliorate the effects of antibiotic use or caesarean birth on infant microbiota in a double blind, placebo-controlled randomized clinical trial. Mothers were given a multispecies probiotic, consisting of Bifidobacterium breve Bb99 (Bp99 2x10(8) cfu) Propionibacterium freundenreichii subsp. shermanii JS (2x10(9)cfu), Lactobacillus rhamnosus Lc705 (5x10(9) cfu) and Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (5x10(9) cfu) (N=168 breastfed and 31 formula-fed), or placebo supplement (N=201 breastfed and 22 formula-fed) during pregnancy, and the infants were given the same supplement. Faecal samples of the infants were collected at 3months and analyzed using taxonomic, metagenomic and metaproteomic approaches.ResultsThe probiotic supplement had a strong overall impact on the microbiota composition, but the effect depended on the infant's diet. Only breastfed infants showed the expected increase in bifidobacteria and reduction in Proteobacteria and Clostridia. In the placebo group, both birth mode and antibiotic use were significantly associated with altered microbiota composition and function, particularly reduced Bifidobacterium abundance. In the probiotic group, the effects of antibiotics and birth mode were either completely eliminated or reduced.ConclusionsThe results indicate that it is possible to correct undesired changes in microbiota composition and function caused by antibiotic treatments or caesarean birth by supplementing infants with a probiotic mixture together with at least partial breastfeeding.Trial registrationclinicaltrials.gov NCT00298337. Registered March 2, 2006.
  • Laatikainen, Reijo; Jalanka, Jonna; Loponen, Jussi; Hongisto, Sanna-Maria; Hillilä, Markku; Koskenpato, Jari; Korpela, Riitta; Salonen, Anne (BioMed Central, 2019)
    Abstract Background A low intake of Fermentable, Oligo-, Di-, Mono-saccharides and Polyols (FODMAPs) is effective in the symptom control of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) patients but may exert negative effects on the intestinal microbiota. The microbial effects of increasing regular or non-FODMAP fibre sources are largely unknown. Furthermore, it is not known if the baseline microbiota composition is associated with individual symptom control during the consumption of different rye products in IBS patients. Our objective was to evaluate whether increased consumption of low-FODMAP rye bread or regular rye bread for 4 weeks would alter the intestinal microbiota composition of IBS patients following their habitual diet, and whether these changes associate to symptoms and/or the baseline microbiota. Methods The study was conducted as a randomized double blind controlled cross-over study (n = 50). Microbiota was analysed by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and associated with gastrointestinal symptoms. Both microbial changes and their associations to symptoms were secondary outcomes. Results The consumption of the test breads did not alter microbiota diversity. Compared to baseline, consumption of the low FODMAP rye bread decreased the abundance of Bacteroides, Flavonifractor, Holdemania, Parasutterella and Klebsiella and showed a trend towards increased bifidobacteria, whereas the regular rye bread decreased the abundance of Flavonifractor. When comparing between the two test breads, Klebsiella was decreased after low-FODMAP rye bread intake. Patients whose symptoms decreased during the low-FODMAP rye bread displayed more Blautia and less Barnesiella at baseline. Conclusions Consumption of low-FODMAP rye bread had modest, potentially beneficial effects on patients’ microbiota while increasing their intake of fibre substantially. The baseline microbiota composition was associated with the variable degrees of symptom relief experienced by the patients. Consumption of a low-FODMAP rye bread might be one way to increase dietary fibre intake and improve the mild dysbiosis often observed among patients with IBS. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02161120 . Retrospectively registered 11 June 2014.